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(Live Science)   Was everybody a swinger way back when?   (livescience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Human, Human evolution, newfound extinct human lineage, modern humans, Denisovan Gallery, Archaic Homo sapiens, Neanderthal, Previous research  
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2750 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Apr 2019 at 12:35 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2019-04-13 10:14:50 AM  
geekologie.comView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 10:24:07 AM  
Yes. You missed it.
 
2019-04-13 11:19:58 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 12:36:08 PM  
Yes. We also all went to Woodstock. Loser.
 
2019-04-13 12:40:35 PM  
Yeah, meanwhile when I was really starting to enjoy the company of young ladies, Jagged Little Pill was released.  Suddenly every woman I knew hated all men.  Good times.
 
2019-04-13 12:46:03 PM  
In the old days, all that was kept 'under the table', so to speak... much of it still is.
 
2019-04-13 12:53:10 PM  
When the cave lights are low it doesn't matter how pronounced her brow ridge is
 
2019-04-13 12:54:27 PM  
Hominids were having sex and nothing seemed to stop them until extinctions came along
 
2019-04-13 12:59:12 PM  
Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?
 
2019-04-13 01:12:41 PM  
Subby hasn't noticed that humans try to mate with everything?
 
2019-04-13 01:17:14 PM  
Especially your mom, subby.
 
2019-04-13 01:17:23 PM  

WelldeadLink: Subby hasn't noticed that humans try to mate with everything?





img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 01:41:26 PM  
Remember, your very existence is due to 3 billion years of your ancestors figuring out how to get it on.  Evolution doesn't care about strength, or intelligence- all it cares about is that you got lucky enough
 
2019-04-13 01:52:16 PM  
No. They just liked to talk about it a lot, just like now. Playboy, right? Hugh Hefner.
You can have whatever kind of sex life you want, OK? It's not a contest.

Glockenspiel Hero: Remember, your very existence is due to 3 billion years of your ancestors figuring out how to get it on.  Evolution doesn't care about strength, or intelligence- all it cares about is that you got lucky enough


And provided that your environment is suitable to procreation. I think that's been true right up until now. But we don't need to get into that right now. It must be too soon.
 
2019-04-13 01:56:58 PM  
 
2019-04-13 02:12:25 PM  
"Way back when"?  It was only the early '80s...
The Swingers - Counting The Beat
Youtube kRy4JfR9pBs
 
2019-04-13 02:34:23 PM  
I misread that as ancient Newfounlander at first and started imagining what kind of crazy dialect they would have. Cool article, the human family tree is way more complex than previously appreciated as a direct succession
 
2019-04-13 03:31:50 PM  
Róisín Murphy - Primitive (Live At Jools Holland)
Youtube aMfZ2fKsgMM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePo​vb8​JA-RQ
 
2019-04-13 03:34:09 PM  
Don't care. Had sex.
 
2019-04-13 04:47:06 PM  

MoriartyLives: Yeah, meanwhile when I was really starting to enjoy the company of young ladies, Jagged Little Pill was released.  Suddenly every woman I knew hated all men.


No.  No they didn't.

Good times.

Yes.  Yes, they were.

Then I got married.

/jk, sweetie!
 
2019-04-13 04:53:59 PM  
Of there's a hole something's going in it.
 
2019-04-13 04:54:37 PM  
I liked that article for several reasons:

- It shows how scientists are NOT dogmatic.  "We thought X but evidence made us doubt that, and then we found out something that showed us not only was X wrong, but we were thinking about it wrong."

- It evokes an image of a world where there are as many types of hominids in the equatorial zone as there are cats.  And many of them interbred.

- It tells us we kicked all their asses and took their shiat.  (Genetically)

- And it hints at a sort of anthropocentric pitfall to avoid.  Of course, as the last homo species surviving, we're going to exhibit the qualities that got us here.  The interesting questions here are who, which and when, not why.

And we already know how.
 
2019-04-13 04:58:22 PM  
proxy.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 05:15:16 PM  
newsd.coView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 05:17:04 PM  
Oh, and if you want swingers, look no further than the bonobo.

I've seen them to it both literally and metaphorically at the same time.
 
2019-04-13 05:41:30 PM  

bughunter: I liked that article for several reasons:

- It shows how scientists are NOT dogmatic.  "We thought X but evidence made us doubt that, and then we found out something that showed us not only was X wrong, but we were thinking about it wrong."

- It evokes an image of a world where there are as many types of hominids in the equatorial zone as there are cats.  And many of them interbred.

- It tells us we kicked all their asses and took their shiat.  (Genetically)

- And it hints at a sort of anthropocentric pitfall to avoid.  Of course, as the last homo species surviving, we're going to exhibit the qualities that got us here.  The interesting questions here are who, which and when, not why.

And we already know how.


An underappreciated angle to this is that it's far more likely that the stray genes we carry with us today are more likely from female homo sapiens getting it on with the non-sapiens males and carrying the offspring to term than the other way around.

It's not like male sapiens are that great about tracking down their one-night stand almost a year later, and volunteering to take a baby they can't even nurse.


So that neanderthal and denisovan DNA that pops up in your 23&me is because your great^great granny got it on with Ogg from that one ugly tribe across the river.
 
2019-04-13 05:41:31 PM  

wraith95: Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?


Well, there is "Clan of the Cave Bear" , if you're into that kind of thing .
 
2019-04-13 05:59:39 PM  
I like Darryl Hannah, but "One Million Years BC" is more my kinda Loana.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-04-13 06:09:31 PM  

wraith95: Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?


Well, there's "House of Chains", also by Steven Baxter. The author is an anthropologist by profession, and loves to dash the "noble savage" trope to bits on the rocks.
 
2019-04-13 06:10:45 PM  

Tranquil Hegemony: wraith95: Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?

Well, there's "House of Chains", also by Steven Baxter. The author is an anthropologist by profession, and loves to dash the "noble savage" trope to bits on the rocks.


Ha, fark me, I got my Stephens confused. House of Chains is by Steven Erikson. I love both of these authors, as well as Stephen R. Donaldson and Neal Stephenson. If they've got some form of "Steven" as their name I'll all over it.
 
2019-04-13 06:18:05 PM  

wraith95: Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?


Drink
 
2019-04-13 06:41:33 PM  
18 to 80
Sick lame or crazy
 
2019-04-13 06:52:48 PM  
Heartwarming stories around the fireplace with berylman: "Did I ever tell you kids about that time I had sex with a lemur who went by the name of Mandy?"
 
2019-04-13 07:29:21 PM  
Roger Wilco mods
 
2019-04-13 09:54:24 PM  
How to make humans fark less:

img.fark.netView Full Size


It turns out being able to do other things once the sun goes down kills the birth rate. Meanwhile, power outages increase it.
 
2019-04-14 12:43:26 AM  
Did they go extinct, or did they get folded into the gene pool of a larger population?

And if two groups can interbreed and create viable offspring, are they really separate species, or just different populations of the same species?
 
2019-04-14 06:46:11 AM  

Tranquil Hegemony: Tranquil Hegemony: wraith95: Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?

Well, there's "House of Chains", also by Steven Baxter. The author is an anthropologist by profession, and loves to dash the "noble savage" trope to bits on the rocks.

Ha, fark me, I got my Stephens confused. House of Chains is by Steven Erikson. I love both of these authors, as well as Stephen R. Donaldson and Neal Stephenson. If they've got some form of "Steven" as their name I'll all over it.


I've read the first two books of that series so far and will continue because it's amazing, but that dude comes up with the worst names in literature. Multi-syllabic nightmares with no similarity to anything familiar. I can't remember the name of a single character and had to check who someone was if they were absent for a bit in the book.
 
2019-04-14 09:54:42 AM  

Dark Side Of The Spoon: Did they go extinct, or did they get folded into the gene pool of a larger population?

And if two groups can interbreed and create viable offspring, are they really separate species, or just different populations of the same species?


There are several definitions of the boundaries of species. For humans, we've agreed that some extinct variants were separate species despite some evidence of interbreeding.
 
2019-04-14 10:31:12 AM  

wraith95: Tranquil Hegemony: Tranquil Hegemony: wraith95: Stephen Baxter's 'Evolution' is a great book that has a few vignettes about how these interactions might have played out. Pure fiction of course. Anybody have any other suggestions?

Well, there's "House of Chains", also by Steven Baxter. The author is an anthropologist by profession, and loves to dash the "noble savage" trope to bits on the rocks.

Ha, fark me, I got my Stephens confused. House of Chains is by Steven Erikson. I love both of these authors, as well as Stephen R. Donaldson and Neal Stephenson. If they've got some form of "Steven" as their name I'll all over it.

I've read the first two books of that series so far and will continue because it's amazing, but that dude comes up with the worst names in literature. Multi-syllabic nightmares with no similarity to anything familiar. I can't remember the name of a single character and had to check who someone was if they were absent for a bit in the book.


Agreed, most of the names here comes up with are pretty awful. Amazing series though, stick with it. Book 3 is probably my favorite.
 
2019-04-14 02:33:32 PM  

OlderGuy: In the old days, all that was kept 'under the table', so to speak... much of it still is.


What happened in Caveas stayed in Caveas.
 
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