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(AZCentral)   Guess what has been the most common cause of death at the Grand Canyon. Nope, that's second   (azcentral.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Grand Canyon, National Park Service, Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, body of a 67-year-old California man, Yosemite National Park, West Rim of the Grand Canyon  
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9565 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2019 at 8:35 AM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-04-11 03:07:26 AM  
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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2019-04-11 04:39:40 AM  
I would have guessed heat and gravity first and second or second and first.
 
2019-04-11 05:39:36 AM  
It's not the fall, it's the rapid deceleration that's the problem.
 
2019-04-11 08:31:04 AM  
Is it stomach parasites... is it?  [checks article]  Awww...
 
2019-04-11 08:37:44 AM  

ZAZ: I would have guessed heat and gravity first and second or second and first.


My first guess would be gravity, second guess would be car accidents. Tons and tons of traffic, eventually someone is gonna get run over.
 
db2
2019-04-11 08:39:22 AM  
Over-flights have been the most common cause of death

I had rock-induced deceleration to win, so I think that counts.
 
2019-04-11 08:39:54 AM  
Cactus sodomy?
 
2019-04-11 08:40:53 AM  
Statistics are skewed by one very heavy casualty event:  The air crash that killed 128 people back in the 1950's.  That accounts for almost *HALF* of the 275 aerial crash casualties.

If you look at the most recent statistics, falls are the most common death mode.
 
2019-04-11 08:41:50 AM  
From the picture it looks as if the railing on that walkway over the Canyon is only waist high. Is that possible? The only way I'd go out on that thing is crawling on my hands and knees.
 
2019-04-11 08:43:01 AM  
People walk down in the morning, some have a tough time walking back uphill in the afternoon sun.
 
2019-04-11 08:44:04 AM  

db2: Over-flights have been the most common cause of death

I had rock-induced deceleration to win, so I think that counts.


first time I've heard airplane crashes called overflights.
 
2019-04-11 08:45:43 AM  

telejester: db2: Over-flights have been the most common cause of death

I had rock-induced deceleration to win, so I think that counts.

first time I've heard airplane crashes called overflights.


More like underflights
 
2019-04-11 08:45:46 AM  
About 12 people die each year within Grand Canyon National Park, according to park spokeswoman Vanessa Ceja.

Twelve?  Damn, I didn't know it was that many.
 
2019-04-11 08:49:27 AM  

dittybopper: Statistics are skewed by one very heavy casualty event:  The air crash that killed 128 people back in the 1950's.  That accounts for almost *HALF* of the 275 aerial crash casualties.

If you look at the most recent statistics, falls are the most common death mode.


Yes. In 1956. So falls have been the most common cause in the last 113 years.
 
2019-04-11 08:49:34 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


/literacy is important, people.
 
2019-04-11 08:50:03 AM  

browneye: About 12 people die each year within Grand Canyon National Park, according to park spokeswoman Vanessa Ceja.

Twelve?  Damn, I didn't know it was that many.


It's rather large, the number of deaths per area is very small. Even compared in population (rated in guest) it's death rate is lower than most cities.
 
2019-04-11 08:51:12 AM  

MinnesotaJack: People walk down in the morning, some have a tough time walking back uphill in the afternoon sun.


Wife and I lived in the desert for a few years. A LOT of people underestimate the temperature swings. It might be 65 in the morning, 100 around noon, and hiking up is a lot harder than down. We liked Ute Canynon and Monument Canyon at CO National Monument, but we started parking at the lower trailheads since going up 500-600 feet at the end of your hike in 90+ degrees sucks. At least we learned how to ration the water we were carrying, and had an emergency gallon in the car.
 
2019-04-11 08:53:43 AM  
The ground.
 
2019-04-11 08:53:55 AM  
In 2009, 16-year-old Saif Savaya attempted to cross off one of the items on his bucket list by swimming across the Colorado River

WTF. Who has a bucket list at that age?
 
2019-04-11 08:56:28 AM  

turbocucumber: The ground.


The landing.
 
2019-04-11 08:58:28 AM  
I used to work with a guy in Las Vegas who did overflights.  He said the worst ones were with Japanese company tours, because the women never weighted more than "50 kg".  Since he had to take a full load based on declared weight (typically 12 people), the planes were often dangerously overloaded.  My house was near the airport and I remember those planes straining to grab altitude.
 
2019-04-11 09:00:21 AM  
"A California prospector with a severe fear of snakes was hiking down Snake Gulch Trail in 1933 when he encountered a rattlesnake."

Right, 'cause if you have a lethal fear of snakes you go hiking on a trail with "snake" on its name in an area known to have snakes to guarantee an encounter with... wait for it... Snakes. Obviously.
 
2019-04-11 09:00:34 AM  
Helpful Indians are always welcome
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2019-04-11 09:00:37 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: In 2009, 16-year-old Saif Savaya attempted to cross off one of the items on his bucket list by swimming across the Colorado River

WTF. Who has a bucket list at that age?


The children of antivaxxers?
 
2019-04-11 09:01:43 AM  
Unsurprisingly, Ghiglieri said the heat and cold are responsible for a significant number of deaths. The dramatic triple-digit temperatures can punish unprepared hikers with heat stroke or cardiac failure.

Margaret Bradley, a lauded marathoner, died of dehydration in 2004 after she attempted to run a 27-mile route in nearly 120-degree summer temperatures with a partner. Officials said the pair were underprepared and didn't bring enough water.


That's the problem... The weather. The first time I hiked the Canyon, I thought they were high when they told me to wear shorts. It was farking snowing! But that's because the South Rim is at 7,000 ft elevation(The North Rim is 8,000 ft). But when we got to the bottom, it was 100 degrees at least. Phantom Ranch is 2,400 ft. You dress for the weather at the top, and you're gonna be in for a surprise within the hour. And then there's the Red Wall. Hottest and steepest part of the hike, and it feels like it takes forever.

When I worked there, I went down and pulled out a family that was way overdue. They had checked with people before they went down that correctly made sure they had plenty of water, but neglected to tell them to take any food. The Canyon isn't an actual stroll in the park, and the weather gets overlooked at times.
 
2019-04-11 09:02:04 AM  
Shark bites.
 
2019-04-11 09:02:49 AM  

MindStalker: browneye: About 12 people die each year within Grand Canyon National Park, according to park spokeswoman Vanessa Ceja.

Twelve?  Damn, I didn't know it was that many.

It's rather large, the number of deaths per area is very small. Even compared in population (rated in guest) it's death rate is lower than most cities.


You can't take the number of visitors for the year and call that the population, you need to take the average daily visitors, by that metric 12 accidental deaths per year is very high.
 
2019-04-11 09:03:14 AM  

browneye: About 12 people die each year within Grand Canyon National Park, according to park spokeswoman Vanessa Ceja.

Twelve?  Damn, I didn't know it was that many.


I thought the only National Park with a book of deaths was Big Bend:
https://www.amazon.com/Death-Big-Bend​-​Laurence-Parent/dp/0974504874
 
2019-04-11 09:06:14 AM  

dittybopper: Statistics are skewed by one very heavy casualty event:  The air crash that killed 128 people back in the 1950's.  That accounts for almost *HALF* of the 275 aerial crash casualties.

If you look at the most recent statistics, falls are the most common death mode.


These were just two commercial aircraft en-route to their destinations. This collision just happened to be over the Grand Canyon. If it happened over Niagara Fall would you blame Niagara Fall for the accident. It's stupid to include this in the statistics.
 
2019-04-11 09:07:02 AM  

Mikey1969: Unsurprisingly, Ghiglieri said the heat and cold are responsible for a significant number of deaths. The dramatic triple-digit temperatures can punish unprepared hikers with heat stroke or cardiac failure.

Margaret Bradley, a lauded marathoner, died of dehydration in 2004 after she attempted to run a 27-mile route in nearly 120-degree summer temperatures with a partner. Officials said the pair were underprepared and didn't bring enough water.

That's the problem... The weather. The first time I hiked the Canyon, I thought they were high when they told me to wear shorts. It was farking snowing! But that's because the South Rim is at 7,000 ft elevation(The North Rim is 8,000 ft). But when we got to the bottom, it was 100 degrees at least. Phantom Ranch is 2,400 ft. You dress for the weather at the top, and you're gonna be in for a surprise within the hour. And then there's the Red Wall. Hottest and steepest part of the hike, and it feels like it takes forever.

When I worked there, I went down and pulled out a family that was way overdue. They had checked with people before they went down that correctly made sure they had plenty of water, but neglected to tell them to take any food. The Canyon isn't an actual stroll in the park, and the weather gets overlooked at times.


Yup, I've mountaneered all over and the Grand Canyon is by far the hardest hiking I've ever done.
 
2019-04-11 09:10:27 AM  

kitsuneymg: drjekel_mrhyde: In 2009, 16-year-old Saif Savaya attempted to cross off one of the items on his bucket list by swimming across the Colorado River

WTF. Who has a bucket list at that age?

The children of antivaxxers?


At the rate we're going, death from measles, mumps or rubella should be topping the list soon enough.
 
2019-04-11 09:18:25 AM  
Murder?
Yeah, right Officer, no really, the cheating biatch my loving wife, she was trying to take a selfie.
 
2019-04-11 09:19:11 AM  

theDesertHamster: It's not the fall, it's the rapid deceleration that's the problem.


There is no such thing as deceleration.  Just acceleration.

/OCD
 
2019-04-11 09:19:40 AM  

Nullav: Shark bites.


With it's teeth, Dear...
 
2019-04-11 09:25:18 AM  

ZAZ: I would have guessed heat and gravity first and second or second and first.


Glad to see heat exhaustion on the list. Having lived in Phoenix, the sheer volume of radiating heat can definitely sneak up on you. Like living in a giant concrete microwave.

Midnight at summer can still easily top 100 degrees.
 
2019-04-11 09:25:41 AM  

drxym: Cactus sodomy?


You pricktease
 
2019-04-11 09:26:56 AM  
going to guess either stupidity and/or curiosity
 
2019-04-11 09:30:37 AM  
Isn't a plane crash a type of fall?  Technically?

I've hiked in and across the Grand Canyon numerous times.  Stunning scenery that never fails to astound me.  Probably my favorite place to go (that or Yosemite).

With that said, it will kill you fast if you are unprepared.  Survival is no joke there, and I have done some remote hikes that gave me pause to the fact that if anything happened, I would not be found for days even though people knew where I was going.

It also will lure you into complacency quickly.  Start that fun family hike from the rim on a summer day when it's 75 degrees out and all downhill and it's easy to go too far.  Then you are faced with a grueling uphill hike in 100 degree sun that turns into a survival march.
 
2019-04-11 09:32:28 AM  
The wolves that ate Tom Brokaw?
 
2019-04-11 09:32:44 AM  

The Garden State: From the picture it looks as if the railing on that walkway over the Canyon is only waist high. Is that possible? The only way I'd never go out on that thing is crawling on my hands and knees.


FTFM
 
2019-04-11 09:36:52 AM  
How long must this madness continue? JUST BUILD THE DANG FLOOR!
 
2019-04-11 09:37:03 AM  
Aliens?
 
2019-04-11 09:41:48 AM  
As a librarian, I must weigh in with a few recommendations and comments. The article cites the book Over The Edge: Death in Grand Canyon (ISBN 0984785809 ) by Michael P. Ghiglieri and Thomas M. Myers and it's an absolute hoot to read. Chapters are divvied up by types of death. Interestingly, death by snake bite is almost unheard of (there is a specific chapter, "Death by Venomous Creatures.") Now, lots of people get bit by snakes and stung by scorpions in the Grand Canyon, but dying from them is extremely rare.

There are a couple of other similar works about Death in [Yellowstone; Yosemite; Glacier] with my second favorite being the Yellowstone one. It's amazing how many people don't realize that if you dive into a pool of geyser water you're likely to be boiled alive. One guy's dog jumped in and he reflexively jumped in to rescue it (which is kind of noble and pretty stupid at the same time). He apparently lingered for a few days in excruciating agony before expiring (sad tag).

Finally, though these are all available at a lot of public libraries and online book sellers (including the Big A), I find it amusing that they are also sold in the bookstores at the various parks. They make great gifts for your hiking buddies!
 
2019-04-11 09:42:50 AM  
We got about twenty feet down the Canyon Trail that folks take burros down before we noped on out of there.  Thankfully the Grand Canyon Lodge had a place with a wine list so I could easy my adrenaline-overbeating heart back into my chest.

Good times, good times.
 
2019-04-11 09:44:59 AM  

thespindrifter: browneye: About 12 people die each year within Grand Canyon National Park, according to park spokeswoman Vanessa Ceja.

Twelve?  Damn, I didn't know it was that many.

I thought the only National Park with a book of deaths was Big Bend:
https://www.amazon.com/Death-Big-Bend-​Laurence-Parent/dp/0974504874


images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size

https://www.amazon.com/Over-Edge-Deat​h​-Grand-Canyon/dp/097009731X
 
2019-04-11 09:47:14 AM  
Rabid burros?
 
2019-04-11 09:47:51 AM  
The people who like to visit the Grand Canyon are people who are not afraid of heights.

img.fark.netView Full Size


Therein lies the problem.
 
2019-04-11 09:53:25 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: In 2009, 16-year-old Saif Savaya attempted to cross off one of the items on his bucket list by swimming across the Colorado River

WTF. Who has a bucket list at that age?


*shrug*
It's just more of a phrase at this stage, for something you'd like to do at least once but is a little out of the way or difficult to reach.
I don't think it's an actual list of specific things that middle aged people sit down and write out anymore.

For example, I'm 32, but if I was talking about the Great Wall of China with someone, I'd say "that's definitely on the bucket list". Same with Tokyo, Sydney, etc.
London wouldn't be as it's a 30 minute flight from me.
 
2019-04-11 10:01:28 AM  

houstondragon: Glad to see heat exhaustion on the list.


AxL sANe: Then you are faced with a grueling uphill hike in 100 degree sun that turns into a survival march.


People severely underestimate heat and how much water they need to bring with them.

Wife and I nearly got to experience that once.  We had as much water as we could carry, had a topo map, etc.  It was planned as a two-night, 15-16 mile backpacking.  Nothing crazy.   First evening we saw the wild horses, camped at the established site by the giant tree, woke up to the sound of horses running past.  Second day, we went up and around, refilling our water at one of the springs on the map, only to find that the trail through the sage brush dissipated into a winding mess of horse tracks, then nothing.  Our two options were to venture forward and trust out topo-reading abilities to eventually venture five miles ahead and finish the loop, or turn around and go back 11ish miles, with a little extra tacked on to hit up another spring.

We headed back a bit, dropped off our thirty pounds of stuff (each), and grabbed our water filters to head to the spring.  While it had water, there were all sorts of algae and critters.  Well, time to see if the filters were worth the money.  Worst case scenario, we'll be shiatting our brains out while waiting for search-and-rescue (phones still had charges).  Thankfully the filters did their jobs, but we nearly shiat ourselves from the raging thunderstorm that popped up that night.

The return trip was mostly downhill and even for some miles, and we made sure to stop at the good spring for as much water as we could without that algal aftertaste.  We drank our water sparingly, though the morning was cool and we knew exactly how far the rest of the trip was.  We got back to the car around 11am, split about half of the emergency gallon and chugged a can of seltzer each, which was thankfully still cold from being in the car overnight.  Overall, about 23 miles in under 48 hours.  The shower once we got home felt great.

/csb
 
2019-04-11 10:06:49 AM  

AxL sANe: Isn't a plane crash a type of fall?  Technically?

I've hiked in and across the Grand Canyon numerous times.  Stunning scenery that never fails to astound me.  Probably my favorite place to go (that or Yosemite).

With that said, it will kill you fast if you are unprepared.  Survival is no joke there, and I have done some remote hikes that gave me pause to the fact that if anything happened, I would not be found for days even though people knew where I was going.

It also will lure you into complacency quickly.  Start that fun family hike from the rim on a summer day when it's 75 degrees out and all downhill and it's easy to go too far.  Then you are faced with a grueling uphill hike in 100 degree sun that turns into a survival march.


Technically yes but it's best to group them separately. The recommended fix for airplane crashes is going to be different than people slipping off a trail.
 
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