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(SoraNews24)   Godwin's Law of Trigonometry   (soranews24.com) divider line
    More: Stupid, Education, Teacher, High school, Matsue Minami High School, Prefectures of Japan, Shimane Prefecture, School, Equal parts  
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5468 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Mar 2019 at 6:34 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-03-25 06:38:45 AM  
Oh it's so ironic.  No Tojo?  No Hirohito?
 
2019-03-25 06:42:52 AM  
Silver lining: Someone in Japan slightly acknowledges that WWII happened.
 
2019-03-25 06:43:03 AM  
Hmmm... what's the angle here?
 
2019-03-25 06:46:30 AM  
So I should stop trying to find the final solution?
 
2019-03-25 06:47:11 AM  
I took this pic a few years ago, just a few blocks from my house. Yes, it reads "Hitrer".

Seemed relevant somehow.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-25 06:49:59 AM  
Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.
 
2019-03-25 07:05:41 AM  
Hitler probably would've been a better art student with a bit of trig knowledge.
 
2019-03-25 07:07:47 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-25 07:15:05 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: Hmmm... what's the angle here?


Snowflakes getting trigged.
 
2019-03-25 07:17:28 AM  
I've been on Fark for quite a while and I think this is the most nothing non-article of absolute nothingness that I've ever seen.
 
2019-03-25 07:18:31 AM  

gnosis301: Hitler probably would've been a better art student with a bit of trig knowledge.


Let's not go off on a tangent here.
 
2019-03-25 07:19:29 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


Godwin Heating and Plumbing - for all of your Gas, Oven, Furnace, and Shower needs.
 
2019-03-25 07:20:41 AM  
He'll never be able to get a mortgage without a job and no one to co-sine...
 
2019-03-25 07:20:49 AM  

wxboy: Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.


Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.

Now, Descriptive Geometry (which is only tangentially connected to regular geometry) was a hell of a lot of fun in drafting classes.
 
2019-03-25 07:21:06 AM  
I've made the switch.
From now on, everyone I don't like is Jean Paul Sartre.
 
2019-03-25 07:21:57 AM  
Way to go, article author Casey Baseel, write a story about education and misspell principal as "principle".

/the student reported the teacher to the principal
//comparing the student to Hitler was the principle thing the teacher did wrong
///turning Slashanese, I think I'm turning Slashanese, I really think so...
 
2019-03-25 07:23:39 AM  
Aww, poor little snowflake is triggered? I mean the Hitler comment was a bit over the top (usually being used when someone has reached the end of their ability to argue their point any further) but the teacher has a point. If the kid can't see that having more information is better than less, he has no place in front of a classroom.
 
2019-03-25 07:40:06 AM  
I thought I knew about Godwin's Law. Looks like I did. Teach that kid lots of Triggernometry. He's the worst shot in the family.
 
2019-03-25 07:41:48 AM  

Kit Fister: wxboy: Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.

Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.

Now, Descriptive Geometry (which is only tangentially connected to regular geometry) was a hell of a lot of fun in drafting classes.


I liked them all. I love riddles, and to me, that's how i approached them.

Which is also why I could never take Maths as a major or accounting, as I'd be bored out of my skull with 'application'.
 
2019-03-25 08:04:42 AM  
Somehow this strangely fails to outrage me.
 
2019-03-25 08:07:41 AM  
Maybe I just skimmed TFA too fast but wasn't the gist of the entire thing simply "Student insulted by something teacher said"?

I guess what I'm wondering is, what exactly makes this news? People get insulted by the millions every day. Is it the invocation of Hitler that makes the story newsworthy, or that it was a teacher? What if the teacher had said "You're just like Pol Pot!" or "You're just like Simon Cowell"? Would that have been as newsworthy?
 
2019-03-25 08:09:11 AM  

Resident Muslim: Kit Fister: wxboy: Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.

Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.

Now, Descriptive Geometry (which is only tangentially connected to regular geometry) was a hell of a lot of fun in drafting classes.

I liked them all. I love riddles, and to me, that's how i approached them.

Which is also why I could never take Maths as a major or accounting, as I'd be bored out of my skull with 'application'.


I love *useful* math. Like, math that applies to engineering and other principles because I can understand the math if I understand the principle.

When the math becomes more theoretical, and you start to base principles on math equations, my head just starts to hurt, because I lose the grounding in understanding the fundamental thing being described, and without having that, you could've just randomly vomited a bunch of numbers and lines and squiggles onto the board/paper and told me it was the formula for sex with a black hole and I wouldn't know any better.
 
2019-03-25 08:26:54 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: I've been on Fark for quite a while and I think this is the most nothing non-article of absolute nothingness that I've ever seen.


That being so, it's beating out some pretty stiff competition.

/ Slow news day on Fark...
 
2019-03-25 08:43:44 AM  
Trigonometry, I have no problem with. It's those damn Jews I can't stand.

/I'm joking. Calm down people.
//I don't like trigonometry either.
 
2019-03-25 08:45:19 AM  

Kit Fister: Resident Muslim: Kit Fister: wxboy: Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.

Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.

Now, Descriptive Geometry (which is only tangentially connected to regular geometry) was a hell of a lot of fun in drafting classes.

I liked them all. I love riddles, and to me, that's how i approached them.

Which is also why I could never take Maths as a major or accounting, as I'd be bored out of my skull with 'application'.

I love *useful* math. Like, math that applies to engineering and other principles because I can understand the math if I understand the principle.

When the math becomes more theoretical, and you start to base principles on math equations, my head just starts to hurt, because I lose the grounding in understanding the fundamental thing being described, and without having that, you could've just randomly vomited a bunch of numbers and lines and squiggles onto the board/paper and told me it was the formula for sex with a black hole and I wouldn't know any better.


I enjoyed math until Calculus. Had to take it three times.

Then I transferred to a different college that required Applied Calculus for my degree. It was a much better class, partly because the professor was great, and partly because now it made sense when you might actually use all this stuff outside of the classroom.
 
2019-03-25 09:19:09 AM  
kittyhas1000legs:

I enjoyed math until Calculus. Had to take it three times.

Then I transferred to a different college that required Applied Calculus for my degree. It was a much better class, partly because the professor was great, and partly because now it made sense when you might actually use all this stuff outside of the classroom.


I took gobs of math in University (Physics and CompSci) and found that math prof teaching competency tends to be a binary function. They are either incredibly good or incredibly awful.
 
2019-03-25 09:27:27 AM  

Kit Fister: [img.fark.net image 850x637]

Godwin Heating and Plumbing - for all of your Gas, Oven, Furnace, and Shower needs.


On a completely different side note, I should form a christian rock band, i wouldn't even have to name my album according to that "radio".

/radio in quotes as bluetooth is technically a radio still.  Im not going for 3 slashies either.
 
2019-03-25 09:38:14 AM  

jso2897: I've made the switch.
From now on, everyone I don't like is Jean Paul Sartre.


Au revoir, gopher
 
2019-03-25 09:43:59 AM  

johnny_vegas: jso2897: I've made the switch.
From now on, everyone I don't like is Jean Paul Sartre.

Au revoir, gopher


That's just what an ugly little walleyed existentialist would say.
 
2019-03-25 09:48:32 AM  
That wasn't acute thing to say, but the student was being deliberately obtuse, right?
 
2019-03-25 09:49:37 AM  

CluelessMoron: kittyhas1000legs:

I enjoyed math until Calculus. Had to take it three times.

Then I transferred to a different college that required Applied Calculus for my degree. It was a much better class, partly because the professor was great, and partly because now it made sense when you might actually use all this stuff outside of the classroom.

I took gobs of math in University (Physics and CompSci) and found that math prof teaching competency tends to be a binary function. They are either incredibly good or incredibly awful.


I think the issue is a two way street in many cases. I say that because most of the professors i've found to be awful were more because their teaching style and method didn't click with how I learned/what i needed as a student. Now, yes, there are definitely objectively awful teachers and objectively good ones, but there is also something to be said about having an instructor that teaches in a way that the student gels with and gets the most out of.
 
2019-03-25 09:57:54 AM  

Mr. Shabooboo: He'll never be able to get a mortgage without a job and no one to co-sine...


Have faith.  Secant you shall find.
 
2019-03-25 10:16:26 AM  

Kit Fister: CluelessMoron: kittyhas1000legs:

I enjoyed math until Calculus. Had to take it three times.

Then I transferred to a different college that required Applied Calculus for my degree. It was a much better class, partly because the professor was great, and partly because now it made sense when you might actually use all this stuff outside of the classroom.

I took gobs of math in University (Physics and CompSci) and found that math prof teaching competency tends to be a binary function. They are either incredibly good or incredibly awful.

I think the issue is a two way street in many cases. I say that because most of the professors i've found to be awful were more because their teaching style and method didn't click with how I learned/what i needed as a student. Now, yes, there are definitely objectively awful teachers and objectively good ones, but there is also something to be said about having an instructor that teaches in a way that the student gels with and gets the most out of.


My best teacher in my life was Dr. Long @ University of Tampa. He taught me how to teach myself.  Mostly out of the classroom, he would walk by and say, "have you ever thought about ..." and it was like an ear worm.  I couldn't let it go till I had the answer.
 
2019-03-25 10:52:12 AM  

MaelstromFL: My best teacher in my life was Dr. Long @ University of Tampa. He taught me how to teach myself. Mostly out of the classroom, he would walk by and say, "have you ever thought about ..." and it was like an ear worm. I couldn't let it go till I had the answer.


The best teachers I've ever had are like that. They present an idea but in a way that makes me want to understand it, rather than just beating me over the head with it.  Those were often the same teachers that believed in learning by doing, so instead of just telling us, they give us the parameters and turn us loose to figure it out for ourselves.
 
2019-03-25 11:05:40 AM  
"You're like Hitler."  The teacher went on to tell his student "You're not cut out to become an educator. I'd feel sorry for the kids who'd be taught by you."

Lulz.   Nothing like a little encouragement from your teachers.

"You're bad and you should feel bad."
 
2019-03-25 11:13:28 AM  

Kit Fister: Resident Muslim: Kit Fister: wxboy: Hating trigonometry is a mortal sine.

Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.

Now, Descriptive Geometry (which is only tangentially connected to regular geometry) was a hell of a lot of fun in drafting classes.

I liked them all. I love riddles, and to me, that's how i approached them.

Which is also why I could never take Maths as a major or accounting, as I'd be bored out of my skull with 'application'.

I love *useful* math. Like, math that applies to engineering and other principles because I can understand the math if I understand the principle.

When the math becomes more theoretical, and you start to base principles on math equations, my head just starts to hurt, because I lose the grounding in understanding the fundamental thing being described, and without having that, you could've just randomly vomited a bunch of numbers and lines and squiggles onto the board/paper and told me it was the formula for sex with a black hole and I wouldn't know any better.


The divide between "useful" and "theoretical" you're describing is simply the line between the math you're comfortable with using and the math you're not.  You can't fully understand even basic physical principles purely through verbal or conceptual analogy because the mathematics are literally the foundation that those imperfect analogies are stemming from.  For example, if you think Ohm's Law makes sense because you can visualize water flowing through a pipe of different sizes, but you can't mathematically relate it to Faraday's Law, or do any math involving trig or calculus, you have no hope of conceptualizing AC current, induction, or impedance, all of which are highly "useful".
 
2019-03-25 11:14:32 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-25 11:30:05 AM  

Kit Fister: When the math becomes more theoretical, and you start to base principles on math equations, my head just starts to hurt, because I lose the grounding in understanding the fundamental thing being described, and without having that, you could've just randomly vomited a bunch of numbers and lines and squiggles onto the board/paper and told me it was the formula for sex with a black hole and I wouldn't know any better.


img.fark.netView Full Size


Hope this helps!
 
2019-03-25 11:35:00 AM  
Abstract thought is frightening to those without the capacity to use it, like Nazis.
 
2019-03-25 11:38:38 AM  

Z-clipped: The divide between "useful" and "theoretical" you're describing is simply the line between the math you're comfortable with using and the math you're not. You can't fully understand even basic physical principles purely through verbal or conceptual analogy because the mathematics are literally the foundation that those imperfect analogies are stemming from. For example, if you think Ohm's Law makes sense because you can visualize water flowing through a pipe of different sizes, but you can't mathematically relate it to Faraday's Law, or do any math involving trig or calculus, you have no hope of conceptualizing AC current, induction, or impedance, all of which are highly "useful".


I'm talking more about the math governing things like load, deflection, electricity, etc. vs the math describing the behavior of black holes or complex quantum systems. :P
 
2019-03-25 11:55:41 AM  
Vector problem.
An electric train Tesla is traveling north at 60mph, the wind is blowing from the east at 20mph. Which way does the smoke blow and how many times does the fire reignite?
 
2019-03-25 12:13:26 PM  

Kit Fister: I love *useful* math. Like, math that applies to engineering and other principles because I can understand the math if I understand the principle.


Learn more principles, then the math follows.  I don't mean that as a jab, but there are very few areas of mathematics that don't apply to some realistic phenomena or set of problems people are working on.  Even up through non-Euclidian topology, combinatorics, linear algebra, etc.

The issue for most is when they don't know what real-world phenomena something applies to, so they're not able to grasp a useful metaphor for what they're manipulating.
 
2019-03-25 12:19:09 PM  

Kit Fister: Trig was always fun. Calculus....*shudders*...that was my weakness.


Pretty much everyone hits a field of math they aren't comfortable with.  Even mathy people.  I'm slightly mathy (according to some people), comfortable with calc, but if I start reading random wiki articles I'll quickly hit stuff that makes me think, seriously, I don't...even?

On a side note, trig is sort of specific, rather than generally useful.  I use calc, matrices, finite fields at work, but not trig.  However, I use trig in my hobby doing game mods.  You need it for writing bots and better enemy AI in 3d shooters.  Like, trig functions are in every other line of code in a 3d shooter.

So kids, if you want to write games, even 2d games, study your trig.
 
2019-03-25 12:23:22 PM  

Moosedick Gladys Greengroin: Vector problem.
An electric train Tesla is traveling north at 60mph, the wind is blowing from the east at 20mph. Which way does the smoke blow and how many times does the fire reignite?


That's a chemistry problem.  And chemistry sucks.  Like law, and non-surgical applied medicine, it's good for people who are only good at memorizing and regurgitating stuff.
 
2019-03-25 12:27:49 PM  

germ78: Abstract thought is frightening to those without the capacity to use it, like Nazis.


Which is why no one scrambled to scoop up German physicists or mathematicians after the war.
 
2019-03-25 12:28:55 PM  
Do you breathe? Then you're just like Barack Obama ...
 
2019-03-25 12:29:45 PM  

Z-clipped: The divide between "useful" and "theoretical" you're describing is simply the line between the math you're comfortable with using and the math you're not.  You can't fully understand even basic physical principles purely through verbal or conceptual analogy because the mathematics are literally the foundation that those imperfect analogies are stemming from.  For example, if you think Ohm's Law makes sense because you can visualize water flowing through a pipe of different sizes, but you can't mathematically relate it to Faraday's Law, or do any math involving trig or calculus, you have no hope of conceptualizing AC current, induction, or impedance, all of which are highly "useful".


This is backwards.

The math won't explain the application to you; you need to match it to empirical observation for that (some extrapolation will follow, but you need to tie it to something).

The elegance of the equation won't tell why you force is related to acceleration, not velocity.
 
2019-03-25 12:50:40 PM  

Kit Fister: CluelessMoron: kittyhas1000legs:

I enjoyed math until Calculus. Had to take it three times.

Then I transferred to a different college that required Applied Calculus for my degree. It was a much better class, partly because the professor was great, and partly because now it made sense when you might actually use all this stuff outside of the classroom.

I took gobs of math in University (Physics and CompSci) and found that math prof teaching competency tends to be a binary function. They are either incredibly good or incredibly awful.

I think the issue is a two way street in many cases. I say that because most of the professors i've found to be awful were more because their teaching style and method didn't click with how I learned/what i needed as a student. Now, yes, there are definitely objectively awful teachers and objectively good ones, but there is also something to be said about having an instructor that teaches in a way that the student gels with and gets the most out of.


To some degree maybe, but we had prof ratings every semester and for math profs the student ratings generally seemed to be at the extremes.

Some of the worst were old tenured profs. I think it was a combination of having forgotten what it's like not to know and simply not giving a damn because they were tenured.
 
2019-03-25 01:43:36 PM  

This text is now purple: The math won't explain the application to you; you need to match it to empirical observation for that (some extrapolation will follow, but you need to tie it to something).


But understanding the application in a useful way requires understanding the mathematical relationships, not just analogous concepts.

This text is now purple:

The elegance of the equation won't tell why you force is related to acceleration, not velocity.

Understanding the mathematical relationship between velocity and acceleration makes it self-evident.  That's the exact point I'm making.   Try explaining what energy is in a useful way without mathematics.  Or, if you happened to have some physics education, try explaining the difference between rest mass and relativistic mass.
 
2019-03-25 02:52:32 PM  
The Cheetoh hated trig, too.
 
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