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(Al Jazeera)   Please note: CNN's "docufiction" about child slaves in Ghana showed children who weren't actually slaves, because they really enjoy working from dawn to dusk for people who aren't their parents, and USA and so forth and so on. Sincerely, Ghana   (aljazeera.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Slavery, child slaves of Lake Volta, existence of pervasive child, Ghana, child slavery, such unfortunate outcomes, allegations of child, fishing communities  
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1084 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Mar 2019 at 10:46 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-03-19 11:53:03 AM  
I'd be more concerned with their robot problem...

2016 Ghana Movie
Youtube iXYmFqEkCGQ
 
2019-03-19 02:35:55 PM  
Can the child leave, or stop working for their master (an "apprentice" works for a "master," right?)

It's awesome that a person can "pre-pay" wages for a child helper/apprentice/worker/(definitely not slave) to the family (not to the child). This sounds totally legit. Apologies from the West--we're too culturally jaded to accept that purchasing a human being, and requiring that person to work, involuntarily, isn't actually "slavery."
 
2019-03-19 07:54:11 PM  
They're not slaves, they're interns!
 
2019-03-19 07:57:18 PM  
Dr Kwame Agyeman also co-authored this article.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-19 10:55:51 PM  
The allegations of child trafficking and child slavery, which are mostly made by Western-based or funded journalists and NGOs with the help of local affiliates, reflect a limited understanding of the lived realities on islands and communities along the lake.

So they're not slaves, it's just because of where they live that they're forced to work?
 
2019-03-19 10:59:31 PM  
I thought you were exaggerating, subby. The article is basically a list of rationalizations for why the things on which CNN reported weren't bad.

But, then again, it's Ghana. There's a reason that Ghana has the highest brain drain in western Africa. People who own properties in both Ghana and Hell choose to live in Hell and rent out the Ghana property to a nice Rwandan family.
 
2019-03-19 11:05:23 PM  
Well I am glad that Ghana cleared that up. Just a cultural misunderstanding is all. Totally normal for parents to sell their children to work for random fishermen against their will or ability to understand what is happening to them. Phew.
 
2019-03-19 11:05:46 PM  
It sounds a lot like something they have in Haiti called a restavek. It's when a poor family hands over a child to a relative, god parent or other person to raise. It comes from French "rester" (so stay) avec (with). These people are usually poor and the child is supposed to get a shot at a better life with their foster family. But they basically become unpaid domestic laborers. It's not slavery in the sense that these kids aren't sold or bought... at least they aren't supposed to be. They can technically return home and will leave when they're older anyways. But there is a lot of potential for many different kinds of abuse. There are some organizations working to make sure these kid's rights are respected and to rescue the ones that are abused. But ending the practice itself is trickier. It would be like ending the entire US foster care system because abuses exist. Without an alternative, it's just not feasible.
 
2019-03-19 11:06:59 PM  
It sounds like they're about where the US was  not that long ago.

My grandmothers were older than this girl.

"One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She is 51 inches high, and has been in the mill for one year. Sometimes she works at night; runs 4 sides and earns 48 cents a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, "I don't remember, then confidentially, I'm not old enough to work, but do just the same." Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C, December 1908"
img.fark.netView Full Size


From Lewis Hines' work for the National Child Labor Committee
 
2019-03-19 11:09:45 PM  
According to a conservative politician and a professional apologist?
 
2019-03-19 11:17:40 PM  
Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.
 
2019-03-19 11:19:24 PM  

fusillade762: They're not slaves, they're internstudent athletes!

 
2019-03-19 11:19:37 PM  
I was going to post some witty reference to one of the cartoon shows where they were satiring child labor laws, something about "Children as young as five could work as they please!" but I can't remember which show it was. I want to say Futurama or Family Guy.
 
2019-03-19 11:23:59 PM  
The United States--Proud to eliminate slavery even if it was late

Wall Street---looking for loopholes to get around the slavery problem since NAFTA.

Just like G.W. Bush outsourcing torture as a loophole so goes "Free Trade".
 
2019-03-19 11:25:42 PM  

jaytkay: It sounds like they're about where the US was  not that long ago.

My grandmothers were older than this girl.

"One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She is 51 inches high, and has been in the mill for one year. Sometimes she works at night; runs 4 sides and earns 48 cents a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, "I don't remember, then confidentially, I'm not old enough to work, but do just the same." Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C, December 1908"
[img.fark.net image 850x585]

From Lewis Hines' work for the National Child Labor Committee


img.fark.netView Full Size


Can you imagine having to choose between eating and having shoes to wear to work?
 
2019-03-19 11:27:04 PM  
Haters Ghana hate.
 
2019-03-19 11:31:36 PM  

Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.


tvoya mat' byla khomyakom, a tvoy otets pakh buzinoy
 
2019-03-19 11:33:13 PM  
FTFA: For sure, this form of fosterage and tutelage can be fraught with complications, particularly surrounding the mode of remuneration for child apprentices.

That's a mighty fancy way of saying that the children who are working are not being paid.
 
2019-03-19 11:33:26 PM  
Look.

It must be monetized in a way to benefit already-privileged foreigners.
 
2019-03-19 11:34:56 PM  

Weatherkiss: I was going to post some witty reference to one of the cartoon shows where they were satiring child labor laws, something about "Children as young as five could work as they please!" but I can't remember which show it was. I want to say Futurama or Family Guy.


Yippee, hooray!

img.fark.netView Full Size


/ Relax
 
2019-03-19 11:35:28 PM  

Voiceofreason01: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

tvoya mat' byla khomyakom, a tvoy otets pakh buzinoy


Or, just post off-topic spam, I guess
 
2019-03-19 11:36:33 PM  

BigNumber12: Weatherkiss: I was going to post some witty reference to one of the cartoon shows where they were satiring child labor laws, something about "Children as young as five could work as they please!" but I can't remember which show it was. I want to say Futurama or Family Guy.

Yippee, hooray!

[img.fark.net image 425x335]

/ Relax


Oh fark, it was Zoolander. Thank you so much for hitting that pressure relief valve in my brain.
 
kab
2019-03-19 11:41:28 PM  
I'm Ghana have to call bullshiat on that article.
 
2019-03-19 11:41:44 PM  

Weatherkiss: I was going to post some witty reference to one of the cartoon shows where they were satiring child labor laws, something about "Children as young as five could work as they please!" but I can't remember which show it was. I want to say Futurama or Family Guy.


There was an American Dad episode where Stan started running a sweatshop out of his basement to make teddy/patriotic bears to sell on QVC.  I think that might be the one.

FWIW, i think that was before Trumpy Bear became a real life thing.
 
2019-03-19 11:43:35 PM  

Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.


Sneering at progressives and CNN shows exactly how earnest is your concern for African people.
 
2019-03-19 11:48:01 PM  

jaytkay: It sounds like they're about where the US was  not that long ago.

My grandmothers were older than this girl.

"One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She is 51 inches high, and has been in the mill for one year. Sometimes she works at night; runs 4 sides and earns 48 cents a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, "I don't remember, then confidentially, I'm not old enough to work, but do just the same." Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C, December 1908"
[img.fark.net image 850x585]

From Lewis Hines' work for the National Child Labor Committee


My great-grandmother was "sold" to a "husband" when her parents moved from Montana to Missouri.
 
2019-03-19 11:50:56 PM  

jaytkay: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

Sneering at progressives and CNN shows exactly how earnest is your concern for African people.


Truth hurts, eh?
 
2019-03-19 11:53:39 PM  

abhorrent1: The allegations of child trafficking and child slavery, which are mostly made by Western-based or funded journalists and NGOs with the help of local affiliates, reflect a limited understanding of the lived realities on islands and communities along the lake.

So they're not slaves, it's just because of where they live that they're forced to work?


More like, as is the case in many developing countries, the labor they are getting paid for is far preferable to the alternative, which is often crushing, unending poverty as either subsistence farmers or simply street people literally sifting through the garbage dump for food every day.

It is not a great situation, but its vastly preferable to starving in the streets.
 
2019-03-19 11:54:04 PM  

fragMasterFlash: jaytkay: It sounds like they're about where the US was  not that long ago.

My grandmothers were older than this girl.

"One of the spinners in Whitnel Cotton Mill. She is 51 inches high, and has been in the mill for one year. Sometimes she works at night; runs 4 sides and earns 48 cents a day. When asked how old she was, she hesitated, then said, "I don't remember, then confidentially, I'm not old enough to work, but do just the same." Out of 50 employees, ten children about her size. Whitnel, N.C, December 1908"
[img.fark.net image 850x585]

From Lewis Hines' work for the National Child Labor Committee

[img.fark.net image 850x595]

Can you imagine having to choose between eating and having shoes to wear to work?


Easy solution is to eat bread and wear the bags as shoes.
 
2019-03-19 11:55:51 PM  

b0rg9: I'd be more concerned with their robot problem...

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/iXYmFqEk​CGQ?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&enablejsapi=1&orig​in=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid​=1]


My favorite part of that is when the robot kicks the baby because I have a nephew that is precisely tall enough to uppercut me straight in the balls. I've thought about kicking him a lot lately.
 
2019-03-19 11:56:22 PM  

Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.


"Moral imperialism" is a meaningless phrase designed to distract from the (lack of) substance to your argument. "Traditional...practices" is a decidedly loaded phrase intended to influence certain segments of the US population (as is calling out "progressives") and your contempt for CNN is palpable. This is either some fairly inspired trolling, a lazy and obvious attempt at social engineering and is definitely someone thinking they're WAY smarter than they actually are aping the style of propogandists. Either way you haven't actually made any real arguments(even if you want us to think you did) and you deserve to be ridiculed.
 
2019-03-19 11:56:54 PM  
 
2019-03-19 11:57:12 PM  
fragMasterFlash: Can you imagine having to choose between eating and having shoes to wear to work?

Conservatives jerk off to that idea every night before going to bed.
 
2019-03-20 12:01:32 AM  

Voiceofreason01: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

tvoya mat' byla khomyakom, a tvoy otets pakh buzinoy


Translation:

Your mother was a hamster, and your father smells of elderberries.
 
2019-03-20 12:03:18 AM  
Voiceofreason01:

"Moral imperialism" is a meaningless phrase designed to distract from the (lack of) substance to your argument. "Traditional...practices" is a decidedly loaded phrase intended to influence certain segments of the US population (as is calling out "progressives") and your contempt for CNN is palpable. This is either some fairly inspired trolling, a lazy and obvious attempt at social engineering and is definitely someone thinking they're WAY smarter than they actually are aping the style of propogandists. Either way you haven't actually made any real arguments(even if you want us to think you did) and you deserve to be ridiculed.

If it weren't drenched in venom, you could feed one of those Ghanaian children for a month on this word salad.
 
2019-03-20 12:04:57 AM  

kbronsito: It sounds a lot like something they have in Haiti called a restavek. It's when a poor family hands over a child to a relative, god parent or other person to raise. It comes from French "rester" (so stay) avec (with). These people are usually poor and the child is supposed to get a shot at a better life with their foster family. But they basically become unpaid domestic laborers. It's not slavery in the sense that these kids aren't sold or bought... at least they aren't supposed to be. They can technically return home and will leave when they're older anyways. But there is a lot of potential for many different kinds of abuse. There are some organizations working to make sure these kid's rights are respected and to rescue the ones that are abused. But ending the practice itself is trickier. It would be like ending the entire US foster care system because abuses exist. Without an alternative, it's just not feasible.


I mean, sending them birth control would just be crazy talk. Jeebus hates that stuff.
 
2019-03-20 12:11:44 AM  

Dark Side Of The Spoon: kbronsito: It sounds a lot like something they have in Haiti called a restavek. It's when a poor family hands over a child to a relative, god parent or other person to raise. It comes from French "rester" (so stay) avec (with). These people are usually poor and the child is supposed to get a shot at a better life with their foster family. But they basically become unpaid domestic laborers. It's not slavery in the sense that these kids aren't sold or bought... at least they aren't supposed to be. They can technically return home and will leave when they're older anyways. But there is a lot of potential for many different kinds of abuse. There are some organizations working to make sure these kid's rights are respected and to rescue the ones that are abused. But ending the practice itself is trickier. It would be like ending the entire US foster care system because abuses exist. Without an alternative, it's just not feasible.

I mean, sending them birth control would just be crazy talk. Jeebus hates that stuff.


It's not that easy logistically. Most children are placed with families in cities and town but come from the countryside. Delivering birth control to rural areas is challenging. You need ongoing sex education and health promoters to do it effectively.
 
2019-03-20 12:17:45 AM  

Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.


I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.
 
2019-03-20 12:19:40 AM  

Peter Weyland: abhorrent1: The allegations of child trafficking and child slavery, which are mostly made by Western-based or funded journalists and NGOs with the help of local affiliates, reflect a limited understanding of the lived realities on islands and communities along the lake.

So they're not slaves, it's just because of where they live that they're forced to work?

More like, as is the case in many developing countries, the labor they are getting paid for is far preferable to the alternative, which is often crushing, unending poverty as either subsistence farmers or simply street people literally sifting through the garbage dump for food every day.

It is not a great situation, but its vastly preferable to starving in the streets.


Slavery is preferable to starvation in much the same way death from tuberculosis was preferable to death from plague.
 
2019-03-20 12:22:55 AM  

flamingboard: fragMasterFlash: Can you imagine having to choose between eating and having shoes to wear to work?

Conservatives jerk off to that idea every night before going to bed.


So if we Make America Great Again common people will breed like rats while rich folk feast upon the suffering of their young? No thanks.
 
2019-03-20 12:23:56 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.


I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.
 
2019-03-20 12:31:29 AM  

Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.

I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.


Based on what, noob? Your extensive knowledge of Ghanian professors and a deep rooted belief that they would never lie about conditions that might support their government? Do you even know whether the government supports "traditional fishermen " or is this more like a Laktota reservation and this professor thinks its "quaint"?
 
2019-03-20 12:40:31 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.

I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.

Based on what, noob? Your extensive knowledge of Ghanian professors and a deep rooted belief that they would never lie about conditions that might support their government? Do you even know whether the government supports "traditional fishermen " or is this more like a Laktota reservation and this professor thinks its "quaint"?


Ok, I guess it was stupid of me to imagine that Ghanaians who study and write about Ghana might have a more nuanced understanding of Ghanaian cultural practices than white liberals on Fark comment threads.  Clearly those silly Ghanaians should just shut up and do what the white Western liberals tell them.
 
2019-03-20 12:56:12 AM  

Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.

I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.

Based on what, noob? Your extensive knowledge of Ghanian professors and a deep rooted belief that they would never lie about conditions that might support their government? Do you even know whether the government supports "traditional fishermen " or is this more like a Laktota reservation and this professor thinks its "quaint"?

Ok, I guess it was stupid of me to imagine that Ghanaians who study and write about Ghana might have a more nuanced understanding of Ghanaian cultural practices than white liberals on Fark comment threads.  Clearly those silly Ghanaians should just shut up and do what the white Western liberals tell them.


So you admit that these Ghanaian professors you are listening to only exist in your imagination and/or your opinion.

Neat. Bold move.
 
2019-03-20 12:57:06 AM  
I've been to Ghana. I literally stepped over a dead person while walking down the street and saw some of what the children were conscripted into. The article is bs.
 
2019-03-20 12:57:24 AM  

Coach McGirk: Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.

I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.

Based on what, noob? Your extensive knowledge of Ghanian professors and a deep rooted belief that they would never lie about conditions that might support their government? Do you even know whether the government supports "traditional fishermen " or is this more like a Laktota reservation and this professor thinks its "quaint"?

Ok, I guess it was stupid of me to imagine that Ghanaians who study and write about Ghana might have a more nuanced understanding of Ghanaian cultural practices than white liberals on Fark comment threads.  Clearly those silly Ghanaians should just shut up and do what the white Western liberals tell them.

So you admit that these Ghanaian professors you are listening to only exist in your imagination and/or your opinion.

Neat. Bold move.


These Ghanaian professors would be the ones who wrote the article which is linked to this thread, genius.
 
2019-03-20 01:00:25 AM  

Hunchback: Voiceofreason01:

"Moral imperialism" is a meaningless phrase designed to distract from the (lack of) substance to your argument. "Traditional...practices" is a decidedly loaded phrase intended to influence certain segments of the US population (as is calling out "progressives") and your contempt for CNN is palpable. This is either some fairly inspired trolling, a lazy and obvious attempt at social engineering and is definitely someone thinking they're WAY smarter than they actually are aping the style of propogandists. Either way you haven't actually made any real arguments(even if you want us to think you did) and you deserve to be ridiculed.

If it weren't drenched in venom, you could feed one of those Ghanaian children for a month on this word salad.


Snowflake, you are far too delicate for Fark if you thought that was venom.  Run away now before I stop finding you funny and prove that.
 
2019-03-20 01:01:59 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Hunchback: Voiceofreason01:

"Moral imperialism" is a meaningless phrase designed to distract from the (lack of) substance to your argument. "Traditional...practices" is a decidedly loaded phrase intended to influence certain segments of the US population (as is calling out "progressives") and your contempt for CNN is palpable. This is either some fairly inspired trolling, a lazy and obvious attempt at social engineering and is definitely someone thinking they're WAY smarter than they actually are aping the style of propogandists. Either way you haven't actually made any real arguments(even if you want us to think you did) and you deserve to be ridiculed.

If it weren't drenched in venom, you could feed one of those Ghanaian children for a month on this word salad.

Snowflake, you are far too delicate for Fark if you thought that was venom.  Run away now before I stop finding you funny and prove that.


I'm, like, totally intimidated and quaking in fear.
 
2019-03-20 01:09:11 AM  

Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Gyrfalcon: Hunchback: Bit of moral imperialism going on here.  When it comes to traditional Ghanaian cultural practices, I would have thought progressives would give more weight to an thoughtful and informative analysis by Ghanaian academics than to a CNN documentary directed by a white European lady.

I give zero weight to slavery apologists, dear heart, and I don't care how "culturally traditional" it may be.

Chattel slavery is evil and wrong, and anyone who pretends otherwise is a moral degenerate.

I don't disagree, but the point is that this might not actually be chattel slavery but something more analogous to kids working on the family farm.  Imo Ghanian professors who study Ghanian culture are more likely to have a better understanding of it than CNN producers.

Based on what, noob? Your extensive knowledge of Ghanian professors and a deep rooted belief that they would never lie about conditions that might support their government? Do you even know whether the government supports "traditional fishermen " or is this more like a Laktota reservation and this professor thinks its "quaint"?

Ok, I guess it was stupid of me to imagine that Ghanaians who study and write about Ghana might have a more nuanced understanding of Ghanaian cultural practices than white liberals on Fark comment threads.  Clearly those silly Ghanaians should just shut up and do what the white Western liberals tell them.



The ILO study to which TFA points includes discussion such as

"Trafficking has been identified as a major occurrence in fishing and children are trafficked from fishing communities within the same district, outside the district, other parts of Ghana and from beyond Ghana. About 39 per cent of respondents indicated that children are trafficked from outside Ghana, 18 per cent indicated they were brought from other parts of Ghana, 15 per cent from within the district and 17 per cent from outlying communities. Trafficked children are largely offered by parents/guardians who are unaware of the environment and conditions that children will be working."

"The study was carried with data gathered from over 40 communities whose key livelihoods is fishing along the Volta Lake and noted with deep concern that child labour and trafficking indeed exist. Children play immeasurable roles in supplementing household incomes, but they are also often exposed to great deal of risks - dangers, hazards and injuries. They combine schooling with fishing and some drop out of school to engage in full‐time fishing. As they work, they receive little or no wages and yet safety measures are appalling as employers do not provide any meaningful safety gears. The situation is pretty disturbing that if conscious effort is not made to curb the menace, child labour and trafficking will persist and generational poverty will be entrenched in those communities."

"Dangers/ Hazards Associated with Lake fishing
 Violent wind or storms.
 Canoe hits a tree stump and causes accident or disintegrates the canoe.
 Drowning from diving.
 Children getting trapped by the net when disentangling from tree stumps.
 Wounds from tree stumps.
 Encounter with dangerous fishes like the "odor" and electric fish.
 Slip and fall on the edge of canoe and hurt ribs (sometimes resulting in death).
 Snake bites.
 Stunted growth of children from excessive work.
 Bloody urination/bilharzia.
 Hearing impairment.
 Nose bleeding.
 Children beaten by master with ropes, wires, paddles, etc."

And there's a section on proposals to combat "Prevalence of slavery-like practices (trafficking, debt bondage, child labour etc.)."

So. Children are trafficked to labor for little or no money, in dangerous conditions, and may be "beaten by master." But child slavery?! What child slavery?!

TFA is fair enough in noting that the situation, like every situation, is more nuanced than it may look at first.

However, they seem to be relying heavily on a semantic distinction without much of a difference.

"Child slavery" seems a fairly appropriate shorthand to accurately convey the gist of the wrongful shiat going on here. Or "child-slavery-like practices" if that really seems significantly better.
 
2019-03-20 01:28:38 AM  
s.aolcdn.comView Full Size

It's not like other cultures haven't gotten past this...Like the UK (Chimney Sweeps 1880) (above).

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size

USA ( Pennsylvania Coal Company 1911)
s.aolcdn.comView Full Size

Australia (farm/ranch work)
 
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Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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