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(Phys Org2)   Wolves lead, dogs follow, and cats still really don't give two farks   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Dog, Scientific method, Human, Male, Gray Wolf, Female, Psychology, Behavior  
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807 clicks; posted to D'awww » on 15 Mar 2019 at 12:05 PM (6 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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6 days ago  
img.fark.netView Full Size

 
6 days ago  
/not Subby
 
6 days ago  
What is "Things we already knew?"
 
6 days ago  
If cats had opposable thumbs, they would use them to snap at us like annoying douchebros in a bar whenever they wanted something.
 
6 days ago  
Both dogs and wolves are pack creatures.  Cats are generally solitary (yes, there are exceptions to this).  So it makes sense that dogs and wolves cooperate well.  They have had to succeed as a species.  Cats do pretty well on their own.
 
6 days ago  
Unless it's really a Flerken.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
6 days ago  

SpaceyCat: Both dogs and wolves are pack creatures.  Cats are generally solitary (yes, there are exceptions to this).  So it makes sense that dogs and wolves cooperate well.  They have had to succeed as a species.  Cats do pretty well on their own.


The Felidae family of various cats are soon to be extinct due to lack of cooperative group behavior. Lions are one of the few species where there is some amount of group behavior. Most others, including the house cat, are solitary animals: tigers, jaguars, mountain lions, cougars...

During some stage of evolution, I suppose solitarism (if that's such a word, and it isn't) was an evolutionary advantageous attribute. Maybe something to do with communicable diseases? Perhaps the ecology had plenty of prey available, so pack hunting wasn't needed, and being solitary prevented spread of such diseases that could wipe out a whole network of extended families. Or rather, the loner animals survived the disease by avoiding it, and passed their loner characteristics to subsequent generations.

Now, we have a lot of evidence that pack hunting is a much more successful means of capturing prey. We see it with dolphins and orcas, hyenas, humans, and a number of other pack hunting specie. (Pack hunting differs from groups that just happen upon a large quantity of prey and jump in opportunistically. Pack hunting requires teamwork, which dolphins and orcas do, but the pelicans or other seabirds above don't necessarily do.)
 
6 days ago  

SpaceyCat: Both dogs and wolves are pack creatures.  Cats are generally solitary (yes, there are exceptions to this).  So it makes sense that dogs and wolves cooperate well.  They have had to succeed as a species.  Cats do pretty well on their own.


Cats are particular in their people. You earn it. Then, they treat you like a young kid with injuries... bringing dead critters and bugs, toys or blankets (yes, I have gotten all of these), and clean you constantly. At least they don't lick my eyebrows off (when I was really ill, one of the cats licked an eyebrow off and denuded one arm.)

/one is asleep on my shoulder now
//another is nudging me for attention
///the other 3 are cavorting in the living room
 
6 days ago  
an arctic wolf is acting friendly in canada
Youtube fuffRO2p7EE
 
6 days ago  

dericwater: SpaceyCat: Both dogs and wolves are pack creatures.  Cats are generally solitary (yes, there are exceptions to this).  So it makes sense that dogs and wolves cooperate well.  They have had to succeed as a species.  Cats do pretty well on their own.

The Felidae family of various cats are soon to be extinct due to lack of cooperative group behavior. Lions are one of the few species where there is some amount of group behavior. Most others, including the house cat, are solitary animals: tigers, jaguars, mountain lions, cougars...

During some stage of evolution, I suppose solitarism (if that's such a word, and it isn't) was an evolutionary advantageous attribute. Maybe something to do with communicable diseases? Perhaps the ecology had plenty of prey available, so pack hunting wasn't needed, and being solitary prevented spread of such diseases that could wipe out a whole network of extended families. Or rather, the loner animals survived the disease by avoiding it, and passed their loner characteristics to subsequent generations.

Now, we have a lot of evidence that pack hunting is a much more successful means of capturing prey. We see it with dolphins and orcas, hyenas, humans, and a number of other pack hunting specie. (Pack hunting differs from groups that just happen upon a large quantity of prey and jump in opportunistically. Pack hunting requires teamwork, which dolphins and orcas do, but the pelicans or other seabirds above don't necessarily do.)


This has been found to be not quite accurate. I first saw it on nature a few months ago, but found this in response to your post.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/11/sc​i​ence/pumas-solitary-social.html
 
6 days ago  

Pointy Tail of Satan: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/fuffRO2p​7EE?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&enablejsapi=1&orig​in=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid​=1]


They seem a split hair from being tame.
 
6 days ago  

Bruscar: Pointy Tail of Satan: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/fuffRO2p​7EE?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&enablejsapi=1&orig​in=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid​=1]

They seem a split hair from being tame.


They tamed wild wolves back in the 60s in a captive university environment.  It requires a human sitting quietly with them in a room they live in for months until they lose their fear, start nibbling on and tugging at clothing and hair and beards. as their first social contact, then start soliciting petting and attention and transferring their trust to other humans.

Ignoring what happened in the final step, there's an anti-wolf "expert" out there who claims that the last step in  wild wolves getting tame and friendly with humans will be savage attacks.  This is the same guy who makes a big noise that wolves Carry the common dog tapeworm, which can cause severe human medical problems in vanishingly rare cases.
 
5 days ago  

SwiftFox: Bruscar: Pointy Tail of Satan: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/fuffRO2p​7EE?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&enablejsapi=1&orig​in=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid​=1]

They seem a split hair from being tame.

They tamed wild wolves back in the 60s in a captive university environment.  It requires a human sitting quietly with them in a room they live in for months until they lose their fear, start nibbling on and tugging at clothing and hair and beards. as their first social contact, then start soliciting petting and attention and transferring their trust to other humans.

Ignoring what happened in the final step, there's an anti-wolf "expert" out there who claims that the last step in  wild wolves getting tame and friendly with humans will be savage attacks.  This is the same guy who makes a big noise that wolves Carry the common dog tapeworm, which can cause severe human medical problems in vanishingly rare cases.


People who hate or fear either wolves or coyotes astound me and I do not trust such people at all.
 
5 days ago  

SpaceyCat: Both dogs and wolves are pack creatures.  Cats are generally solitary (yes, there are exceptions to this).  So it makes sense that dogs and wolves cooperate well.  They have had to succeed as a species.  Cats do pretty well on their own.


One thing I like about cats is their adaptability.
My resident clowder (gang o' cats) consists of four at the moment. Not related, and eleven years difference spread through their ages.
They make an awesome, surprisingly cohesive team.
 
5 days ago  

Pointy Tail of Satan: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/fuffRO2p​7EE?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&enablejsapi=1&orig​in=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&widgetid​=1]


From the video:
"THIS VIDEO IS AWESOME!"

It is, too.
 
5 days ago  

Pointy Tail of Satan: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/fuffRO2p​7EE]


I'm envisioning  something like this happened to Lewis and Clark first meeting the buffalo wolves, for them to label them "extremely tame and kind".
 
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