Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Newsweek)   At the first atomic bomb test, scientists made bets on whether it would cause Earth to catch fire   (newsweek.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Nuclear weapon, Nuclear fallout, Trinity Test, Nuclear weapons, years of nuclear negotiations, heavy rain, Lists of nuclear disasters and radioactive incidents, test site  
•       •       •

3360 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Mar 2019 at 11:10 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



120 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2019-03-14 10:42:58 AM  
I wonder if Oppenheimer went to light up when the threw the switch...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 10:54:49 AM  
Fermi's bet was a friendly joke between colleagues who had done the math and concluded it wouldn't happen because it couldn't happen, (although maybe Compton didn't). From an intervew with Hans Bethe:

...Oppenheimer [soon to be appointed head of Los Alamos Laboratory] got quite excited and said, "That's a terrible possibility," and he went to his superior, who was Arthur Compton, the director of the Chicago Laboratory, and told him that. Well, I sat down and looked at the problem, about whether two nitrogen nuclei could penetrate each other and make that nuclear reaction, and I found that it was just incredibly unlikely. And I said so, and I think Teller was very quickly convinced and so was Oppenheimer when he'd returned from seeing Compton.
...
[Emil] Konopinski, who was an expert on weak interactors, and Konopinski together with [inaudible] showed that it was incredibly impossible to set the hydrogen, to set the atmosphere on fire. They wrote one or two very good papers on it, and that put the question really at rest. They showed in great detail why it is impossible. But, of course, it spooked [Compton]. Well, let me first say one other thing: Fermi, of course, didn't believe that this was possible, but just to relieve the tension at the Los Alamos [Trinity] test [on July 16, 1945], he said, "Now, let's make a bet whether the atmosphere will be set on fire by this test." [laughter] And I think maybe a few people took that bet. But, for instance, in Compton's mind it was not set to rest. He didn't see my calculations. He even less saw Konopinski's much better calculations, so it was still spooking in his mind when he gave an interview at some point, and so it got into the open literature, and people are still excited about it."


As for what would be required to pull off such a stunt, it's not gonna happen on Earth. Nitrogen-nitrogen cross section's just too small despite the atmosphere being made mostly of the stuff. And there isn't enough deuterium in our oceans to make that work either. But somewhere in the universe there might exist a species unfortunate enough to have evolved on an ocean world whose planetary system formed out of a nebula that contained around 20 times the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio that characterizes our solar system. If they were to build a 200 teraton bomb (the device would be about ten times as big as the Three Gorges Dam - we're talking about some really stubborn as well as really suicidal aliens here), and were to set it off underwater, they would theoretically be capable of cleansing their world in thermonuclear fire.
 
2019-03-14 11:11:35 AM  
Nuclear devices are becoming far too complex to explode. Nuclears are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better.

Split second decisions are....needed, and the complexity creates danger. All of this for great cost yet very little gain. I don't know about you, but I don't want Albert Einstein to be my nuclear. I want great physical professions that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a bomb.
 
2019-03-14 11:11:59 AM  
cdn.newsapi.com.auView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 11:13:50 AM  
Sadly, it didn't.

I Don't Want To Set The World On Fire-The Ink Spots
Youtube 6l6vqPUM_FE
 
2019-03-14 11:14:33 AM  
You know, as I edited Trump's tweet above, a disturbing thought occurred to me:  could Mike_LowELL actually be Trump and his presidency is all a huge prank?
 
2019-03-14 11:14:49 AM  
That seems like an especially stupid bet.  The sort you can never possibly collect on.  "Oh goody!  I was right.  We are all gonna die!"
 
KIA
2019-03-14 11:14:50 AM  
It wasn't the "Earth" it was "all of the available oxygen around the Earth" that might have caught fire.  Sheesh.
 
2019-03-14 11:15:11 AM  

Diogenes: Nuclear devices are becoming far too complex to explode. Nuclears are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better.

Split second decisions are....needed, and the complexity creates danger. All of this for great cost yet very little gain. I don't know about you, but I don't want Albert Einstein to be my nuclear. I want great physical professions that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a bomb.


And that was definitely written by a human who understands English.
 
2019-03-14 11:15:34 AM  
Who won?
 
2019-03-14 11:16:32 AM  
static.tvtropes.orgView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 11:17:10 AM  
I.I. Rabi showed up late, took the last slot available in the yield pool, and won.  Unlikely things happen.
 
2019-03-14 11:17:49 AM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: That seems like an especially stupid bet.  The sort you can never possibly collect on.  "Oh goody!  I was right.  We are all gonna die!"


The nice part of accidentally destroying the universe is the amount of paperwork involved.
 
2019-03-14 11:18:01 AM  
this is still a rough watch.

DR J ROBERT OPPENHEIMER NOW I AM BECOME DEATH, THE DESTROYER OF WORLDS
Youtube dus_M4sn0_I
 
2019-03-14 11:18:26 AM  
Couldn't they have just dropped the whole thing into the sea, you know, like at the end of Spiderman 2?  Because that would totally stop a nuclear reaction of any sort
 
2019-03-14 11:18:29 AM  

UberDave: I wonder if Oppenheimer went to light up when the threw the switch...

[img.fark.net image 425x244]


In real life they were never that close to the blast that the shockwave would put out the match.

Though later Oppenheimer did meet the inventor of the warp drive.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 11:18:36 AM  

Twilight Farkle: Fermi's bet was a friendly joke between colleagues who had done the math and concluded it wouldn't happen because it couldn't happen, (although maybe Compton didn't). From an intervew with Hans Bethe:

...Oppenheimer [soon to be appointed head of Los Alamos Laboratory] got quite excited and said, "That's a terrible possibility," and he went to his superior, who was Arthur Compton, the director of the Chicago Laboratory, and told him that. Well, I sat down and looked at the problem, about whether two nitrogen nuclei could penetrate each other and make that nuclear reaction, and I found that it was just incredibly unlikely. And I said so, and I think Teller was very quickly convinced and so was Oppenheimer when he'd returned from seeing Compton.
...
[Emil] Konopinski, who was an expert on weak interactors, and Konopinski together with [inaudible] showed that it was incredibly impossible to set the hydrogen, to set the atmosphere on fire. They wrote one or two very good papers on it, and that put the question really at rest. They showed in great detail why it is impossible. But, of course, it spooked [Compton]. Well, let me first say one other thing: Fermi, of course, didn't believe that this was possible, but just to relieve the tension at the Los Alamos [Trinity] test [on July 16, 1945], he said, "Now, let's make a bet whether the atmosphere will be set on fire by this test." [laughter] And I think maybe a few people took that bet. But, for instance, in Compton's mind it was not set to rest. He didn't see my calculations. He even less saw Konopinski's much better calculations, so it was still spooking in his mind when he gave an interview at some point, and so it got into the open literature, and people are still excited about it."

As for what would be required to pull off such a stunt, it's not gonna happen on Earth. Nitrogen-nitrogen cross section's just too small despite the atmosphere being made mostly of the stuff. And there isn't enough deuterium in our oceans to make that work either. But somewhere in the universe there might exist a species unfortunate enough to have evolved on an ocean world whose planetary system formed out of a nebula that contained around 20 times the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio that characterizes our solar system. If they were to build a 200 teraton bomb (the device would be about ten times as big as the Three Gorges Dam - we're talking about some really stubborn as well as really suicidal aliens here), and were to set it off underwater, they would theoretically be capable of cleansing their world in thermonuclear fire.


A 200 teraton bomb seems likely to cause other issues beyond setting the atmosphere on fire.
 
2019-03-14 11:20:39 AM  

Diogenes: Nuclear devices are becoming far too complex to explode.


I have been doing some VERY advanced work in the botanical field working with plants that are able to produce extremely high amounts of heat, while at the same time able to self-heal through the process of regeneration.  So far, there have been a few, um, runaway exothermic reactions, but I'm learning how to mitigate those instances.  The goal is to develop into human trials to see if the process is weaponizable.  If I play my cards right, I may just be able to up my rating on HorOrNot...

Wish me luck!
 
2019-03-14 11:21:25 AM  
Around midnight, Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist in charge of the experiment, began to fear that the heavy rain might damage some of the electrical circuits on the tower, so he sent a scientist to climb the shot tower and huddle beside the bomb, nestled into a nest of wet cables and ropes and pulleys, where he tried to read Desert Island Decameron, a collection of humorous essays, but found himself counting seconds between lightning flashes and thunder, trying to measure the distance between the tower and the lightning strikes.

Who farking taught this person how to write? WTF was the scientist doing up there? All the paragraph/sentence says is that he "went up there", not a hint as to what he was supposed to be farking doing. You have what, 5 verbs? Climb, huddle, read, count, and measure? Not a word in there says why Oppenheimer sent the scientist up there. Is he trying to cover some of the components? Was he there to test things? Visually inspect for water damage? Or did he just get sent up there to count the time between lightning flashes and thunder?
 
2019-03-14 11:22:36 AM  
My friend's father was there. He had a plaque on a wall in his office stating he was a member of The Royal Order of Radiated Desert Rats. He went on to design storage facilities for nuclear waste.
 
2019-03-14 11:22:40 AM  

StatelyGreekAutomaton: Twilight Farkle: Fermi's bet was a friendly joke between colleagues who had done the math and concluded it wouldn't happen because it couldn't happen, (although maybe Compton didn't). From an intervew with Hans Bethe:

...Oppenheimer [soon to be appointed head of Los Alamos Laboratory] got quite excited and said, "That's a terrible possibility," and he went to his superior, who was Arthur Compton, the director of the Chicago Laboratory, and told him that. Well, I sat down and looked at the problem, about whether two nitrogen nuclei could penetrate each other and make that nuclear reaction, and I found that it was just incredibly unlikely. And I said so, and I think Teller was very quickly convinced and so was Oppenheimer when he'd returned from seeing Compton.
...
[Emil] Konopinski, who was an expert on weak interactors, and Konopinski together with [inaudible] showed that it was incredibly impossible to set the hydrogen, to set the atmosphere on fire. They wrote one or two very good papers on it, and that put the question really at rest. They showed in great detail why it is impossible. But, of course, it spooked [Compton]. Well, let me first say one other thing: Fermi, of course, didn't believe that this was possible, but just to relieve the tension at the Los Alamos [Trinity] test [on July 16, 1945], he said, "Now, let's make a bet whether the atmosphere will be set on fire by this test." [laughter] And I think maybe a few people took that bet. But, for instance, in Compton's mind it was not set to rest. He didn't see my calculations. He even less saw Konopinski's much better calculations, so it was still spooking in his mind when he gave an interview at some point, and so it got into the open literature, and people are still excited about it."

As for what would be required to pull off such a stunt, it's not gonna happen on Earth. Nitrogen-nitrogen cross section's just too small despite the atmosphere being made mostly of the stuff. And there isn't eno ...


I'm just thinking of all the antique china I have in my grandmother's old curio.
 
2019-03-14 11:23:17 AM  
Nuclear engineering dropout here, I remember hearing a story about how one of the scientists on the Manhattan project predicted that the test would ignite the upper atmosphere and burn the whole world.

All the other scientists and engineers basically said "no, that's stupid" and they went ahead with Trinity.

... the bet was obviously a joke.   There's no collecting on it if you took the position that the world will end.

If you will remember a few years ago, a "scientist" predicted that the LHC would create a micro-singularity that would destroy the entire world.  It's basically that, but in a secret government project.
 
2019-03-14 11:24:23 AM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: That seems like an especially stupid bet.  The sort you can never possibly collect on.  "Oh goody!  I was right.  We are all gonna die!"


I was thinking it'd be a sure thing to bet against.  Either everything's groovy and you get to collect, or Earth becomes a match head and everybody's got bigger concerns.
 
2019-03-14 11:24:25 AM  

Mikey1969: Around midnight, Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist in charge of the experiment, began to fear that the heavy rain might damage some of the electrical circuits on the tower, so he sent a scientist to climb the shot tower and huddle beside the bomb, nestled into a nest of wet cables and ropes and pulleys, where he tried to read Desert Island Decameron, a collection of humorous essays, but found himself counting seconds between lightning flashes and thunder, trying to measure the distance between the tower and the lightning strikes.

Who farking taught this person how to write? WTF was the scientist doing up there? All the paragraph/sentence says is that he "went up there", not a hint as to what he was supposed to be farking doing. You have what, 5 verbs? Climb, huddle, read, count, and measure? Not a word in there says why Oppenheimer sent the scientist up there. Is he trying to cover some of the components? Was he there to test things? Visually inspect for water damage? Or did he just get sent up there to count the time between lightning flashes and thunder?


He was sent up there to read Desert Island Decameron in the rain, next to an atomic bomb.  Duh.
 
2019-03-14 11:25:35 AM  

angstareturns: this is still a rough watch.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/dus_M4sn​0_I]


Funny though, it could turn out the be the savior or the world.  NASA scientists have suggested that a small regional nuclear war could reverse global warming.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/0​2​/26/nuclear-war-global-warming_n_82849​6.html
 
2019-03-14 11:27:43 AM  

Big Lee: Mikey1969: Around midnight, Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist in charge of the experiment, began to fear that the heavy rain might damage some of the electrical circuits on the tower, so he sent a scientist to climb the shot tower and huddle beside the bomb, nestled into a nest of wet cables and ropes and pulleys, where he tried to read Desert Island Decameron, a collection of humorous essays, but found himself counting seconds between lightning flashes and thunder, trying to measure the distance between the tower and the lightning strikes.

Who farking taught this person how to write? WTF was the scientist doing up there? All the paragraph/sentence says is that he "went up there", not a hint as to what he was supposed to be farking doing. You have what, 5 verbs? Climb, huddle, read, count, and measure? Not a word in there says why Oppenheimer sent the scientist up there. Is he trying to cover some of the components? Was he there to test things? Visually inspect for water damage? Or did he just get sent up there to count the time between lightning flashes and thunder?

He was sent up there to read Desert Island Decameron in the rain, next to an atomic bomb.  Duh.


Oh, I missed that part. :-) Seriously, that whole thing was like a joke setup with no punchline.
 
2019-03-14 11:28:20 AM  
And the LHC was going to form a black hole. Yeah, they were just deciding who was paying for beers later. The only people who thought it would hapoen were the tinfoil hatters.
 
2019-03-14 11:29:31 AM  
Old news is always best when "buried" for a while then dragged out of its tomb and dangled around as if it were new 'news'...
 
2019-03-14 11:30:58 AM  

angstareturns: this is still a rough watch.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/dus_M4sn​0_I]


I've read that line a thousand times, but to see him say it...
 
2019-03-14 11:32:55 AM  
1. The bet was a joke. No one seriously believed the atmosphere would catch fire, particularly Enrico Fermi.
2. The "joke" has been known for decades. If you've read anything about the history of the Manhattan project you're probably already heard of it. In fact nothing in the article is news, so why it appears in Newsweek in 2019 is the only mystery here.
3. It's everso entertaining to read about a historical scientific event through the eyes of a poet.
4. If you really want a good read on how the Manhattan project played out read Brighter Than a Thousand Suns. It was written about 10 years after the war and the author was able to speak with many of those actually involved. I'll go out on a limb and suggest that it will offer more insight than Ms. Hall.
 
2019-03-14 11:33:50 AM  

Mikey1969: Big Lee: Mikey1969: Around midnight, Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist in charge of the experiment, began to fear that the heavy rain might damage some of the electrical circuits on the tower, so he sent a scientist to climb the shot tower and huddle beside the bomb, nestled into a nest of wet cables and ropes and pulleys, where he tried to read Desert Island Decameron, a collection of humorous essays, but found himself counting seconds between lightning flashes and thunder, trying to measure the distance between the tower and the lightning strikes.

Who farking taught this person how to write? WTF was the scientist doing up there? All the paragraph/sentence says is that he "went up there", not a hint as to what he was supposed to be farking doing. You have what, 5 verbs? Climb, huddle, read, count, and measure? Not a word in there says why Oppenheimer sent the scientist up there. Is he trying to cover some of the components? Was he there to test things? Visually inspect for water damage? Or did he just get sent up there to count the time between lightning flashes and thunder?

He was sent up there to read Desert Island Decameron in the rain, next to an atomic bomb.  Duh.

Oh, I missed that part. :-) Seriously, that whole thing was like a joke setup with no punchline.


As far as life experiences go that's got to be a unique one.  I can imagine that years later he'd read that to his grandkids and start with "you won't believe this, but the first time I read these stories..."
 
2019-03-14 11:34:28 AM  

Tyrosine: 1. The bet was a joke. No one seriously believed the atmosphere would catch fire, particularly Enrico Fermi.
2. The "joke" has been known for decades. If you've read anything about the history of the Manhattan project you're probably already heard of it. In fact nothing in the article is news, so why it appears in Newsweek in 2019 is the only mystery here.
3. It's everso entertaining to read about a historical scientific event through the eyes of a poet.
4. If you really want a good read on how the Manhattan project played out read Brighter Than a Thousand Suns. It was written about 10 years after the war and the author was able to speak with many of those actually involved. I'll go out on a limb and suggest that it will offer more insight than Ms. Hall.


Did that author bother to explain WHY Oppenheimer sent the scientist up the tower in the rain?
 
2019-03-14 11:38:06 AM  
This is not news.  It's an old anecdote.
 
2019-03-14 11:39:41 AM  

Mikey1969: Around midnight, Robert Oppenheimer, the scientist in charge of the experiment, began to fear that the heavy rain might damage some of the electrical circuits on the tower, so he sent a scientist to climb the shot tower and huddle beside the bomb, nestled into a nest of wet cables and ropes and pulleys, where he tried to read Desert Island Decameron, a collection of humorous essays, but found himself counting seconds between lightning flashes and thunder, trying to measure the distance between the tower and the lightning strikes.

Who farking taught this person how to write? WTF was the scientist doing up there? All the paragraph/sentence says is that he "went up there", not a hint as to what he was supposed to be farking doing. You have what, 5 verbs? Climb, huddle, read, count, and measure? Not a word in there says why Oppenheimer sent the scientist up there. Is he trying to cover some of the components? Was he there to test things? Visually inspect for water damage? Or did he just get sent up there to count the time between lightning flashes and thunder?


"Louisa Hall is an American novelist and poet. She is the author of the book Trinity which has been longlisted for the Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize, which is available in hardback now and published in paperback on April 4"

God help us.
 
2019-03-14 11:40:11 AM  

Russ1642: And the LHC was going to form a black hole. Yeah, they were just deciding who was paying for beers later. The only people who thought it would hapoen were the tinfoil hatters.


And the people who survived The Mist.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 11:40:28 AM  
What a stupid article.

The whole thing seems to interpret facts like various scientists showing slightly different predictions based on fissile efficiency to "EVEN SCIENTISTS DIDN'T KNOW IF IT WOULD BLOWED UP OR KILL EARTH OR JUST MAKE EVERYONE INTO POTATOES."

They were pretty farking sure it would work. I think the surprise was seeing it and realizing the ramifications of what that meant.
 
2019-03-14 11:41:23 AM  
i believe that when told by scientists that "the world might catch fire", Roosevelt said "go ahead".
so the guy's who thought up the bomb also thought the world's air could catch fire.
makes you wonder....
 
2019-03-14 11:45:18 AM  

WTP 2: i believe that when told by scientists that "the world might catch fire", Roosevelt said "go ahead".
so the guy's who thought up the bomb also thought the world's air could catch fire.
makes you wonder....


See, literally none of that is true.
 
2019-03-14 11:45:48 AM  

Diogenes: You know, as I edited Trump's tweet above, a disturbing thought occurred to me:  could Mike_LowELL actually be Trump and his presidency is all a huge prank?


If so, he's mistakenly gone with "Kafkaesque" not "Kaufmanesque".
 
2019-03-14 11:46:52 AM  

wildcardjack: The nice part of accidentally destroying the universe is the amount of paperwork involved.


Oh, that is totally going on my list of great quotes.
 
2019-03-14 11:47:43 AM  

palelizard: Diogenes: You know, as I edited Trump's tweet above, a disturbing thought occurred to me:  could Mike_LowELL actually be Trump and his presidency is all a huge prank?

If so, he's mistakenly gone with "Kafkaesque" not "Kaufmanesque".


LOL.  Well played.
 
2019-03-14 11:48:52 AM  

Twilight Farkle: Fermi's bet was a friendly joke between colleagues who had done the math and concluded it wouldn't happen because it couldn't happen, (although maybe Compton didn't).


Came here to say the exact same thing.  Sometimes people have a morbid sense of humor.
 
2019-03-14 11:49:50 AM  

Mikey1969: Tyrosine: 1. The bet was a joke. No one seriously believed the atmosphere would catch fire, particularly Enrico Fermi.
2. The "joke" has been known for decades. If you've read anything about the history of the Manhattan project you're probably already heard of it. In fact nothing in the article is news, so why it appears in Newsweek in 2019 is the only mystery here.
3. It's everso entertaining to read about a historical scientific event through the eyes of a poet.
4. If you really want a good read on how the Manhattan project played out read Brighter Than a Thousand Suns. It was written about 10 years after the war and the author was able to speak with many of those actually involved. I'll go out on a limb and suggest that it will offer more insight than Ms. Hall.

Did that author bother to explain WHY Oppenheimer sent the scientist up the tower in the rain?


He needed brass magnets.
 
2019-03-14 11:51:36 AM  

Tyrosine: 4. If you really want a good read on how the Manhattan project played out read Brighter Than a Thousand Suns. It was written about 10 years after the war and the author was able to speak with many of those actually involved. I'll go out on a limb and suggest that it will offer more insight than Ms. Hall.


I like "The Making of the Atomic Bomb" by Richard Rhodes, and its sequel on the development of the Hydrogen bomb "Dark Sun".
 
2019-03-14 11:56:36 AM  

emersonbiggins: StatelyGreekAutomaton: Twilight Farkle: Fermi's bet was a friendly joke between colleagues who had done the math and concluded it wouldn't happen because it couldn't happen, (although maybe Compton didn't). From an intervew with Hans Bethe:

...Oppenheimer [soon to be appointed head of Los Alamos Laboratory] got quite excited and said, "That's a terrible possibility," and he went to his superior, who was Arthur Compton, the director of the Chicago Laboratory, and told him that. Well, I sat down and looked at the problem, about whether two nitrogen nuclei could penetrate each other and make that nuclear reaction, and I found that it was just incredibly unlikely. And I said so, and I think Teller was very quickly convinced and so was Oppenheimer when he'd returned from seeing Compton.
...
[Emil] Konopinski, who was an expert on weak interactors, and Konopinski together with [inaudible] showed that it was incredibly impossible to set the hydrogen, to set the atmosphere on fire. They wrote one or two very good papers on it, and that put the question really at rest. They showed in great detail why it is impossible. But, of course, it spooked [Compton]. Well, let me first say one other thing: Fermi, of course, didn't believe that this was possible, but just to relieve the tension at the Los Alamos [Trinity] test [on July 16, 1945], he said, "Now, let's make a bet whether the atmosphere will be set on fire by this test." [laughter] And I think maybe a few people took that bet. But, for instance, in Compton's mind it was not set to rest. He didn't see my calculations. He even less saw Konopinski's much better calculations, so it was still spooking in his mind when he gave an interview at some point, and so it got into the open literature, and people are still excited about it."

As for what would be required to pull off such a stunt, it's not gonna happen on Earth. Nitrogen-nitrogen cross section's just too small despite the atmosphere being made mostly of the stuff. And there isn't eno ...

I'm just thinking of all the antique china I have in my grandmother's old curio.


I'm worried that my one plastic lawn chair with a wobbly leg might tip over.
 
2019-03-14 11:57:16 AM  

Russ1642: And the LHC was going to form a black hole. Yeah, they were just deciding who was paying for beers later. The only people who thought it would hapoen were the tinfoil hatters.


Here was my take on it: If the LHC did somehow manage to create a black hole here on Earth, none of us would be around to notice, so why worry? I also knew that it wouldn't, so I was doubly blasé about the whole "black hole" aspect of the farking thing, and was more interested in the actual real world outcome of the thing.
 
2019-03-14 12:00:55 PM  

Mikey1969: Russ1642: And the LHC was going to form a black hole. Yeah, they were just deciding who was paying for beers later. The only people who thought it would hapoen were the tinfoil hatters.

Here was my take on it: If the LHC did somehow manage to create a black hole here on Earth, none of us would be around to notice, so why worry? I also knew that it wouldn't, so I was doubly blasé about the whole "black hole" aspect of the farking thing, and was more interested in the actual real world outcome of the thing.


On the other hand maybe it did punch a hole into an alternate reality and suck us all through it.  How else do you explain Trump, Brexit, and the Fords in Ontario?
 
2019-03-14 12:03:13 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
What if you've got no place to go?
 
2019-03-14 12:04:27 PM  
StatelyGreek

I'm worried that my one plastic lawn chair with a wobbly leg might tip over.

Oh, it is SO much worse than that...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-14 12:07:13 PM  

Mikey1969: Russ1642: And the LHC was going to form a black hole. Yeah, they were just deciding who was paying for beers later. The only people who thought it would hapoen were the tinfoil hatters.

Here was my take on it: If the LHC did somehow manage to create a black hole here on Earth, none of us would be around to notice, so why worry? I also knew that it wouldn't, so I was doubly blasé about the whole "black hole" aspect of the farking thing, and was more interested in the actual real world outcome of the thing.


The LHC went online for initial testing in 2008.

That is when the world really started careening out of control.

They may well be connected.

/jk
//OR AM I??????
 
Displayed 50 of 120 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report