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(Guardian)   American food giants swallow family farms. Om nom nom   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Factory farming, Industrial agriculture, Animal rights, Livestock, Agribusiness, Agriculture, Intensive farming, Animal welfare  
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692 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Mar 2019 at 5:32 AM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



32 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2019-03-13 05:44:33 AM  
And I'm sure the piles of unsold soy haven't helped them much either.
 
2019-03-13 06:29:48 AM  
Trump's trade wars are costing family famrms ot. Selling out to Monsanto
 
2019-03-13 06:37:14 AM  

AllYourFarkIsUs: Trump's trade wars are costing family famrms ot. Selling out to Monsanto

Bayer
 
2019-03-13 07:06:13 AM  
It won't stop people from claiming that China/The EU/Canada/Democrats are destroying the "Great American Small Family Farm" next time the bill to shovel more money into ADM's shareholder's pockets comes up.
 
2019-03-13 07:10:10 AM  

groppet: And I'm sure the piles of unsold soy haven't helped them much either.


Unless you are a big company.  Congress already bailed them out. The trade war should polish off quite a few family businesses.  That makes room for more automation and government subsidies as well as Dollar General stores.
Even from their cardboard boxes they will still vote straight ticket GOP.
 
2019-03-13 07:13:58 AM  
Is this why Del Monte quit shipping canned peas a couple months ago?
 
2019-03-13 08:38:09 AM  
And they're probably getting farm subsidies on top of it, too.
 
2019-03-13 09:19:35 AM  
Primitive accumulation of capital. Simple as that.
 
2019-03-13 09:38:16 AM  
Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.
 
2019-03-13 09:46:29 AM  

MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.


I think you have something there.  We should eliminate all farms that ship products to cities.
 
2019-03-13 10:16:18 AM  
This has been going on since... well, forever.
 
2019-03-13 10:21:47 AM  

MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.


And by extension, we dont need mom and pop jointers, artists, vets, doctors, auto repairers, leatherworkers, or pretty much anything.

/All hail the Corporate Congress
 
2019-03-13 10:23:40 AM  

MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.


No, take pity on those who cannot adapt to the times.
 
2019-03-13 10:29:19 AM  
This happened to my family around 1965 when my grandparents on both sides sold off their farms in the midwest. My mother's little sister and her husband tried to hang on to a small farming operation but by about 1980 they were broke, lost everything and got divorced. My former uncle then went to work at a sweet corn canning factory, until he kind of lost his mind and went on disability. My parents were the only kids on either family to go to college in the late 50s, early 60s, and they got out right in time. There's no community to go back and visit.
 
2019-03-13 10:31:45 AM  

This text is now purple: This has been going on since... well, forever Reagan.

/FT4Y
 
2019-03-13 10:36:14 AM  
And yer only 45 years behind the reporters efforts on western canadian wheat farmers. (I read about this in 75 at university) Beyond the grain harvest?, I think.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-13 10:41:17 AM  

MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.


Consumers, please enjoy your McD, Kraft, Coca-Cola, Smithfield, and Johnson and Johnson products.

All artisanal, specialty, and homemade products are now unavailable, as are restaurants without at least 10 franchise locations.
 
2019-03-13 10:42:14 AM  

COMALite J: This text is now purple: This has been going on since... well, forever Reagan.
/FT4Y


Feudalism was big concerns swallowing small farms. The origination of cities was large groups of people securing a monopoly on local food production. This has literally been occurring since before recorded history.
 
2019-03-13 10:44:57 AM  
When I was a kid back in the 80's my parents would have the Sunday morning political talk shows on. I wondered why on earth companies like Archer Daniels Midland, Monsanto, and Cargill would bother to advertise on such shows. Little did I know.
 
2019-03-13 10:45:31 AM  

ajgeek: MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.

And by extension, we dont need mom and pop jointers, artists, vets, doctors, auto repairers, leatherworkers, or pretty much anything.

/All hail the Corporate Congress


You don't see a distinction between an artist, a craftsman, and a producer of a commodity?
 
2019-03-13 10:49:53 AM  

COMALite J: This text is now purple: This has been going on since... well, forever Reagan.
/FT4Y


The Dustbowl/Depression...

Every cylcle, the farms get larger. The ones being pushed out now pushed out others a couple of generations ago.
 
2019-03-13 11:01:38 AM  

ajgeek: MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.

And by extension, we dont need mom and pop jointers, artists, vets, doctors, auto repairers, leatherworkers, or pretty much anything.

/All hail the Corporate Congress


We're well on our way to not having mom and pop auto repair places. And the causes are similar to the farm issues. Equipment and training costs are way up, corporate stores pump out oil changes and brakes at a loss. Corporate stores hemorrhage money, hoping to one day be the only player in town. Meanwhile consumers complain that pricing has gone up 30%-40% since the 90s, while it should have doubled by now due to rising costs.
 
2019-03-13 11:35:35 AM  

Pats_Cloth_Coat: ajgeek: MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.

And by extension, we dont need mom and pop jointers, artists, vets, doctors, auto repairers, leatherworkers, or pretty much anything.

/All hail the Corporate Congress

You don't see a distinction between an artist, a craftsman, and a producer of a commodity?


Of course I do. Do you not see that if a small group controls the vast majority of a commodity's production, it creates a massive vulnerability in the system which can cause enormous rippling effects across entire populations should they inevitably screw up?

You don't even have to look far. Romaine lettuce was tainted, and the FDA had all of them pulled. Yeah, it wasn't world ending, but it had a pretty large effect on the supply chain.

Now imagine that happens to the wheat or soy crops, or worse, both. There's real risk of real food shortages then. Wide varieties in producers, even commodities, limit that effect, and allow for a natural check and balance, something that can't exist with the mega corporation. Too Big to Fail is an abomination of sociopathic design.

Capitalism isn't about getting all the money. It's been perverted and people believe it's about that now, but that's not what it was. It was about adding value, selling that, and being able to get comfortable in life. You win, the buyer wins. That humanity was taken out, and those like me who bring it up are summarily mocked for mentioning it. Doesn't make it wrong, though.
 
2019-03-13 11:55:24 AM  
Not exactly new information here, it's been going on for a long time...

John Mellencamp - Rain On The Scarecrow
Youtube joNzRzZhR2Y
 
2019-03-13 11:55:57 AM  

ajgeek: MikeyFuccon: Look. I won't try to recommend how many farms the US or Canada needs, except to suggest that there are probably far too many.

We don't have mom-and-pop auto manufacturers, and we probably don't need mom-and-pop "food manufacturers" either.

And by extension, we dont need mom and pop jointers, artists, vets, doctors, auto repairers, leatherworkers, or pretty much anything.

/All hail the Corporate Congress


Don't forget fark's obsession with craft beers. Hypocrites.
 
2019-03-13 12:30:14 PM  
They keeping choosing suicide and voting repub.
 
2019-03-13 01:02:09 PM  

Pats_Cloth_Coat: You don't see a distinction between an artist, a craftsman, and a producer of a commodity?


An artist working for hire (the traditional form -- patronage) is producing a commodity.
A craftsman is just an artist who makes something useful.
 
2019-03-13 01:03:48 PM  

ajgeek: Too Big to Fail is an abomination of sociopathic design.


Hard to avoid in agriculture, though. Agriculture has high entry costs and fickle price and yield conditions. The easiest way to survive is to amortize those costs as widely as possible and buffer oneself from local conditions as best you can.

Much like building aquariums, the easiest way to handle that is to go big.
 
2019-03-13 01:07:47 PM  

T-Boy: This happened to my family around 1965 when my grandparents on both sides sold off their farms in the midwest. My mother's little sister and her husband tried to hang on to a small farming operation but by about 1980 they were broke, lost everything and got divorced. My former uncle then went to work at a sweet corn canning factory, until he kind of lost his mind and went on disability. My parents were the only kids on either family to go to college in the late 50s, early 60s, and they got out right in time. There's no community to go back and visit.


I am glad my folks left small town Ohio before I was born, it is not a bad town and they are doing better than some but they are having issues with keeping young people in town and have had some business closures that have hurt the community.
A few years ago I was watching a documentary about small town middle America and how a lot of these places never recovered from the great depression. At their peak they probably had 10,000-15,000 people and now have maybe 500.
 
2019-03-13 01:26:54 PM  

This text is now purple: Pats_Cloth_Coat: You don't see a distinction between an artist, a craftsman, and a producer of a commodity?

An artist working for hire (the traditional form -- patronage) is producing a commodity.
A craftsman is just an artist who makes something useful.


So, you really don't.

An artist produces something unique that has some creative inspiration

A craftsman produces something of unique quality - so. two people might make chairs by hand, they are craftsmen

A commodity is an item that is interchangeable. Chairs produced by a factory would be a commodity. Oil and soybeans are commodities.

A farmer produces commodities (yes, someone can raise prized cows or whatever, I speak in general).

So a community losing individuals or families who produce commodities for corporations that produce commodities is not the same as losing artists or craftsmen.
 
2019-03-13 02:07:04 PM  
The basic complaint here is that factory farms are too efficient and they drive down the price of food so the little mom and pop farmers can't make money.

Of course, for everybody who isn't a farmer, cheaper food is a good thing. Being efficient is a good thing.  Increasing the amount of food made in the country is a good thing.
 
2019-03-13 06:39:39 PM  
More e coli and salmonella  for everyone
 
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