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(CNBC)   Face it - it's not yours anymore   (cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Facial recognition system, Privacy, Biometrics, Facial recognition, IBM's dataset, researchers' use, knowledge of the people, images of a diverse array of faces  
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2057 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Mar 2019 at 1:26 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



11 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2019-03-12 01:08:15 PM  
Class action lawsuit?
 
2019-03-12 01:30:43 PM  
You put your face online for anyone to see.
Why are you complaining that your photo was seen?
 
2019-03-12 01:39:35 PM  

Pinnacle Point: Class action lawsuit?


Give it your best shot. Been screaming about this for years, but I might as well be on the Gallaudet campus for all the good that screaming has done. The pics involved are publicly available for use, and explicitly identified as such on Flickr by the people who uploaded them there.

It's going to be hard to make a case that IBM somehow violated the law, especially given that they didn't, themselves, gather the pics. I find it odd that the article focuses on IBM, when, if anyone's to blame, it's Flickr and Yahoo!. Flickr and Yahoo! gathered and released the collection. IBM used a tiny subset of that collection, roughly 1%, and built a dataset based on the photos in that subset.
 
2019-03-12 01:39:45 PM  
I'm actually surprised that people are surprised by this.
 
2019-03-12 01:48:57 PM  
Every web site has web pages, yet online, there is only one Facebook. Figure that one out.
 
2019-03-12 02:57:27 PM  
EULA has all the answers and more, maybe you should read them before posting to the world your photos.
 
2019-03-12 03:06:04 PM  
Yahoo! released millions of images from Flickr in 2014, IBM sorted them for faces, coded the face shots for characteristics including skin tone, gender and age, then released the dataset to more than 250 research departments. Lots of past research in this field has used scraped photos.  IBM develops facial recognition software for use in retail, law enforcement and other applications. IBM is being squirrelly about how to know if your face is included so you can opt out.  If you opt out, it fails because there is no effect on the versions already released. Using the photos this way may be legal in most of the US but ... Illinois' Biometric Privacy Act requires opt-in consent for use of biometric data including facial features.  There's a private right of action, and the Illinois Supreme Court recently gave plaintiffs a leg up** by holding that they need not show actual damages to bring an enforcement action.

**Rosenbach v. Six Flags
 
2019-03-12 04:36:28 PM  
if you have no concern for security or privacy, use facial recognition and voice activated hardware/software.

after all, you can trust the corporate makers of said equipment.

Mark Zuckerberg put black electrical tape over the camera on his laptop for a reason.

Librem 5
 
2019-03-12 08:28:06 PM  
Someone already has the solution to this problem.

i.gifer.comView Full Size
 
2019-03-12 09:10:27 PM  
Data "about you" is not "your" data.
 
2019-03-13 06:04:27 AM  
Maybe this is what that jaguar was doing.
 
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