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(Mother Jones)   Presenting the rare Food/Racism/Politics catch: "The Aftertaste of Slavery Still Haunts American Cooking. On the latest episode of Bite, we talk to a historian who studies the lives of Virginia's enslaved cooks." Aunt Jemima unavailable for comment   (motherjones.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Slavery, historian Kelley Fanto Deetz, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, black people, slave labor, routine cases of unintended food poisoning, poor whites, African slaves  
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376 clicks; posted to Food » on 11 Mar 2019 at 7:15 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



8 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2019-03-11 12:25:00 PM  
I'll save you click.

-Rich people built outbuildings to house their kitchens to the cooking wouldn't stink up their house.
-Their slave cooks lived in those buildings and generally had shiatty lives.
-Food poisoning was common back then so paranoid rich people worried their slaves were poisoning them.
-It was a dark time in America
-Buy my book.
 
2019-03-11 12:41:46 PM  

abhorrent1: -Rich people built outbuildings to house their kitchens to the cooking wouldn't stink up their house.


Also so it wouldn't heat it up.
 
2019-03-11 01:12:10 PM  

This text is now purple: abhorrent1: -Rich people built outbuildings to house their kitchens to the cooking wouldn't stink up their house.

Also so it wouldn't heat burn it up.


FTFY

Intentional kitchen fires were not unknown. How better to fark over the owner than burning down the house?
 
2019-03-11 01:30:35 PM  

Another Government Employee: This text is now purple: abhorrent1: -Rich people built outbuildings to house their kitchens to the cooking wouldn't stink up their house.

Also so it wouldn't heat burn it up.

FTFY

Intentional kitchen fires were not unknown. How better to fark over the owner than burning down the house?


You might get what you're after.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-11 02:26:39 PM  
I have to admit that I hoped the article would be more Undercover Brother oriented.

"Ain't no white man know about no sixteen herbs and spices and giblets."

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-11 03:29:52 PM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size

Right after the Civil War, there were a lot more regional cookbooks focused on the south compared to the north, and most of them were a not subtle defense of the Lost Cause theory. Good book, she gets very sarcastic when writing about 50s/60s gourmets who were convinced women ruined American cooking.
 
2019-03-11 07:10:44 PM  

Another Government Employee: This text is now purple: abhorrent1: -Rich people built outbuildings to house their kitchens to the cooking wouldn't stink up their house.

Also so it wouldn't heat burn it up.

FTFY

Intentional kitchen fires were not unknown. How better to fark over the owner than burning down the house?


Came here to say this.  Fire was one of the biggest fears of that time, and for good reason.
 
2019-03-12 02:24:38 AM  
Food of the Enslaved: Barbecue, featuring Michael Twitty
Youtube GwkRWIwZ43A


Few more videos on this channel with Michael Twitty, a culinary historian that is specialized in African-American from the 18th-19th century
 
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