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(Fox News)   Mayor of Bologna sick of Spaghetti Bolognese requests from tourists. It doesn't exist. It's a bunch of baloney   (foxnews.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Italian cuisine, Pasta, Bolognese sauce, Bologna, Italy, Spaghetti, historic northern city of Bologna, spaghetti bolognese  
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641 clicks; posted to Food » on 10 Mar 2019 at 11:35 AM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-03-10 10:00:12 AM  
Thank our lord and saviour Jesus Christ for fox news in these times of turmoil to focus a spotlight on the actual, and really true issues of our day. Amen
 
2019-03-10 10:00:43 AM  
And on a Sunday too
The lords day
A day of wrist
 
2019-03-10 11:12:59 AM  
"I will stamp out these ridiculous misconceptions about this city or my name isn't Oscar Mayor!"
 
2019-03-10 11:38:47 AM  
Why are tourists trying to order food from the mayor?  Is he wearing a red and white checked suit and a sandwich board?  I've met my mayor a few times, and it never occurred to me that I might order food from them.  I might have to try that next time.
 
2019-03-10 11:57:42 AM  
Fine. I'm heading out to find Veal Milanese or a nice plate of Caprese instead.
 
2019-03-10 12:20:59 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Andy died later that day, apparently from untreated facial lacerations.
 
2019-03-10 12:33:42 PM  
Next they'll tell me the mayor of Hamburg gets tired of people ordering Hamburgers.  Or the mayor of Vienna gets mad when someone wants some Vienna Sausages.... and when I ask for a Polish sausage in Poland they just tell me "they're all Polish sausages dumbass."
 
2019-03-10 12:46:11 PM  
I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.
 
Ant
2019-03-10 01:11:09 PM  

lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.


And if those people lived in the US, they'd be the ones calling pizza " 'za "
 
Ant
2019-03-10 01:12:38 PM  
Tagliatelle or pappardelle is better anyway
 
2019-03-10 01:19:44 PM  
Y'all need this.
 
2019-03-10 01:37:19 PM  
Holt: This man is full of Balogna...
Terry: I'm pretty sure it's Baloney.
Holy: Yes. We'll use the American bastardization of the word.


fun fact it actually is baloney when talking about someone lying
 
2019-03-10 01:51:42 PM  

Ant: Tagliatelle or pappardelle is better anyway


Next we'll hear from the mayors of those towns.
 
2019-03-10 02:03:09 PM  
Let me know after you talk to the Mayor of Mortadella.
 
2019-03-10 02:03:35 PM  
Making Marcella's bolognese right now. (Three hours so far) I've just finished the pasta with my Atlas pasta machine and will  be slicing the love of papprerdale very soon. Yum
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1​0​15181-marcella-hazans-bolognese-sauce
 
2019-03-10 02:21:07 PM  

The Silver Mullet: Y'all need this.


I like Gennaro Contaldo's recipe.
 
2019-03-10 02:30:44 PM  
Rigatoni Bolognese is far superior.
 
2019-03-10 02:37:09 PM  
Fun fact: Bologna has the oldest university.

Spent a long weekend there because why the hell not.
 
2019-03-10 02:42:21 PM  
around 50 years ago in middle America a meal called spaghetti meant spaghetti with a tomato and meat sauce and the sauce didn't have to be specified. This was what was served for school lunches and at church spaghetti nights. Maybe at some restaurants you could get spaghetti with meat balls.

Home cooks had their special spaghetti recipes. My father's also included mushrooms and blacks olives (of course from cans).

A family that bought Kraft green can Parmesan mostly used it for their spaghetti nights.

img.fark.netView Full Size


I first heard this Southern Italian / Italian American sauce called Bolognese in London which probably happened because people learned that there were other sauces you could put on spaghetti and "tomato and meat sauce" didn't sound too sophisticated.

Also around 50 years middle America didn't know the word "pasta". Why should they? There were only 2 types: spaghetti and macaroni. Lasagna was only starting to enter the nation's consciousness and you could buy it in cans.

img.fark.netView Full Size
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-03-10 03:04:27 PM  
You haven't lived until you've had a German  1 inch thick bologna sandwich.
 
2019-03-10 03:25:22 PM  
Tangent.

There's a Donald E. Westlake Dortmunder book that has a character named Malogna.  (pronounced: Maloney)

IIRC, he's the chief of police investigating a robbery perpetrated by Dortmunder's merry band of misfits. When Dortmunder realizes that they've stolen Mafia property he calls Malogna trying to find some anonymous way to return it. Malogna can't believe what he's hearing and so asks his (very gay) chief of staff to listen in on the conversation. The cop later asks his chief of staff if he thinks Dortmunder is gay. (Dortmunder is the epitome of gray, drab heterosexuality. )  And I quote this from memory, "Well, if he is, he's so far in the closet, he poots mothballs."**

I've tried to do justice to the gag.


**It could be "poops" but I don't think so.
 
2019-03-10 03:35:05 PM  
Bolognese is a sauce, as is alfredo, pesto,etc.

Spaghetti is a pasta, as is fettuccine, penne, etc.

You can mix any sauce with any pasta and, voila, you've created <pasta> <sauce>.  It exists.  Live with it grumpy-mayor-man!
 
2019-03-10 03:48:18 PM  

HairBolus: around 50 years ago in middle America a meal called spaghetti meant spaghetti with a tomato and meat sauce and the sauce didn't have to be specified. This was what was served for school lunches and at church spaghetti nights. Maybe at some restaurants you could get spaghetti with meat balls.

Home cooks had their special spaghetti recipes. My father's also included mushrooms and blacks olives (of course from cans).

A family that bought Kraft green can Parmesan mostly used it for their spaghetti nights.

[img.fark.net image 307x415]

I first heard this Southern Italian / Italian American sauce called Bolognese in London which probably happened because people learned that there were other sauces you could put on spaghetti and "tomato and meat sauce" didn't sound too sophisticated.

Also around 50 years middle America didn't know the word "pasta". Why should they? There were only 2 types: spaghetti and macaroni. Lasagna was only starting to enter the nation's consciousness and you could buy it in cans.

[img.fark.net image 380x295][img.fark.net image 394x256]


As my mother's family was actually from Calabria and Sicily, my childhood was a bit different. And I never saw that lasagne could be in a can until I was an adult. It sounds horrifying.

But I can cook both Italian and Italian-American now with some better ingredients than my mom, aunts, and Grandma had, even without the special trip to Scimeca's.

Anyway. I remember a wider variety of pastas, but they were mostly referred to by their names or collectively as noodles if they weren't spaghetti or macaroni. And sometimes meatballs were put into the sauce, but it was never Bolognese.
 
2019-03-10 04:22:30 PM  

EasilyDistracted: Bolognese is a sauce, as is alfredo, pesto,etc.

Spaghetti is a pasta, as is fettuccine, penne, etc.

You can mix any sauce with any pasta and, voila, you've created <pasta> <sauce>.  It exists.  Live with it grumpy-mayor-man!


This is true of any food. But Italian food is very territorial. Think of regional American BBQ (apparently they're different?) or even clam chowder. People from outside those regions don't know or care about the difference but those who live there are proud of their town/region's versions.
 
2019-03-10 04:25:25 PM  

HairBolus: around 50 years ago in middle America a meal called spaghetti meant spaghetti with a tomato and meat sauce and the sauce didn't have to be specified. This was what was served for school lunches and at church spaghetti nights. Maybe at some restaurants you could get spaghetti with meat balls.

Home cooks had their special spaghetti recipes. My father's also included mushrooms and blacks olives (of course from cans).

A family that bought Kraft green can Parmesan mostly used it for their spaghetti nights.

[img.fark.net image 307x415]

I first heard this Southern Italian / Italian American sauce called Bolognese in London which probably happened because people learned that there were other sauces you could put on spaghetti and "tomato and meat sauce" didn't sound too sophisticated.

Also around 50 years middle America didn't know the word "pasta". Why should they? There were only 2 types: spaghetti and macaroni. Lasagna was only starting to enter the nation's consciousness and you could buy it in cans.

[img.fark.net image 380x295][img.fark.net image 394x256]


You grew up very sheltered and you are projecting
 
2019-03-10 04:43:57 PM  

AlwaysRightBoy: Making Marcella's bolognese right now. (Three hours so far) I've just finished the pasta with my Atlas pasta machine and will  be slicing the love of papprerdale very soon. Yum
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/10​15181-marcella-hazans-bolognese-sauce


For those who don't subscribe to the NYT, try here; https://leitesculinaria.com/840​57/reci​pes-marcella-hazan-bolognese-sauce.htm​l
 
2019-03-10 05:53:17 PM  

iron de havilland: The Silver Mullet: Y'all need this.

I like Gennaro Contaldo's recipe.



WTF

There is no garlic in there.

This is not food.
 
2019-03-10 05:53:45 PM  
Spag bol? It's as Italian as Marmite!
 
2019-03-10 06:07:18 PM  

EasilyDistracted: Bolognese is a sauce, as is alfredo, pesto,etc.

Spaghetti is a pasta, as is fettuccine, penne, etc.

You can mix any sauce with any pasta and, voila, you've created <pasta> <sauce>.  It exists.  Live with it grumpy-mayor-man!


You can, in the same way that you can mix any alcohol with any soda. It doesn't mean it's a good idea.

Some sauces work well with some pastas, others do not. If you are ordering spaghetti bolognese in Italy, you're ordering from the Clueless Tourist menu.
 
2019-03-10 06:09:11 PM  

lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.


Sadly it's all over Europe, Scandinavia, and the US too.
 
2019-03-10 06:12:19 PM  

Bonzo_1116: iron de havilland: The Silver Mullet: Y'all need this.

I like Gennaro Contaldo's recipe.


WTF

There is no garlic in there.

This is not food.


Eh, he's an Italian chef who has cooked all over Italy. If he says that's a traditional Bolognese ragù, I'm inclined to believe him.
 
2019-03-10 06:15:12 PM  
Not only is "spaghetti bolognese" a foreign concoction, authentic bolognese sauce (simply called "ragu" in Bologna, "ragu bolognese" elsewhere in Italy) is nothing like the tomato sauce that goes by that name elsewhere. Real ragu bolognese is a meat sauce built on a base of soffitto, diced vegetables, and just a little tomato puree. It takes several hours to make and tastes wonderful.

Which reminds me, I need to try making it in the Instant Pot and see if I can get that four hour simmer down...
 
2019-03-10 06:24:53 PM  

czetie: lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.

Sadly it's all over Europe, Scandinavia, and the US too.


I just think that kind of meat in sauce is gross. When I moved here to Cincinnati and found out about their "chili" that they put on spaghetti, I just wretched.

czetie: Not only is "spaghetti bolognese" a foreign concoction, authentic bolognese sauce (simply called "ragu" in Bologna, "ragu bolognese" elsewhere in Italy) is nothing like the tomato sauce that goes by that name elsewhere. Real ragu bolognese is a meat sauce built on a base of soffitto, diced vegetables, and just a little tomato puree. It takes several hours to make and tastes wonderful.


I do make something a bit like this now and then, but I don't really use much meat, just some pancetta with the soffritto. And there is one thing I like with the meat that way; it's Lydia's cannelloni. But in general, I don't understand the need for meaty sauce; was never that way when I was growing up.

Mom, the aunts, and Grandma did all argue over the best way to make lasagne. I prefer it with no meat at all like Grandma's was, but tend to make it more often like Aunt Helen did, with pieces of sausage, because my sons like it that way.
 
2019-03-10 06:35:55 PM  

iron de havilland: Bonzo_1116: iron de havilland: The Silver Mullet: Y'all need this.

I like Gennaro Contaldo's recipe.


WTF

There is no garlic in there.

This is not food.

Eh, he's an Italian chef who has cooked all over Italy. If he says that's a traditional Bolognese ragù, I'm inclined to believe him.


I don't care if Cato the Censor noted the recipe down and had it installed in the Twelve Tables.  If there's no garlic, it's not food.
 
Ant
2019-03-10 06:46:48 PM  

czetie: Not only is "spaghetti bolognese" a foreign concoction, authentic bolognese sauce (simply called "ragu" in Bologna, "ragu bolognese" elsewhere in Italy) is nothing like the tomato sauce that goes by that name elsewhere. Real ragu bolognese is a meat sauce built on a base of soffitto, diced vegetables, and just a little tomato puree. It takes several hours to make and tastes wonderful.

Which reminds me, I need to try making it in the Instant Pot and see if I can get that four hour simmer down...


I did it a couple weeks ago. I used the Serious Eats pressure cooker Bolognese recipe combined with the Deadspin Ragu Bolognese recipe.

Ground beef
Ground pork
Chopped chicken livers
Fish sauce (didn't have anchovies)
Gelatin mixed with beef stock
Small can of tomato paste
Not quite a whole bottle of wine
Half and half

It's farking delicious on pappardelle
 
Ant
2019-03-10 06:48:33 PM  
Oh, and I can never remember to get pancetta, so I used finely chopped bacon. I used an immersion blender before the pressure cook
 
2019-03-10 07:56:48 PM  
Of course it exists, Mayor.  Your region invented a sauce.  You don't get to tell people not to use your sauce on whatever pasta they want.
 
2019-03-10 08:04:04 PM  

aerojockey: Of course it exists, Mayor.  Your region invented a sauce.  You don't get to tell people not to use your sauce on whatever pasta they want.


The problem being that what a lot of people call Bolognese sauce is completely unlike any sauce or ragu ever made in Bologna.
 
2019-03-10 08:35:48 PM  

Ant: czetie: Not only is "spaghetti bolognese" a foreign concoction, authentic bolognese sauce (simply called "ragu" in Bologna, "ragu bolognese" elsewhere in Italy) is nothing like the tomato sauce that goes by that name elsewhere. Real ragu bolognese is a meat sauce built on a base of soffitto, diced vegetables, and just a little tomato puree. It takes several hours to make and tastes wonderful.

Which reminds me, I need to try making it in the Instant Pot and see if I can get that four hour simmer down...

I did it a couple weeks ago. I used the Serious Eats pressure cooker Bolognese recipe combined with the Deadspin Ragu Bolognese recipe.

Ground beef
Ground pork
Chopped chicken livers
Fish sauce (didn't have anchovies)
Gelatin mixed with beef stock
Small can of tomato paste
Not quite a whole bottle of wine
Half and half

It's farking delicious on pappardelle


Sounds really good. Too many people are squeamish about chicken livers. Anchovies are the bacon of the sea and total umami bombs. I know this sounds sacrilegious but I often save time by combining equal quantities of supermarket "meatloaf mix" meat --  beef, pork, and veal -- with ground beef; that seems to give a really good proportion of the different meats. I like to use dried porcini mushrooms too.

Three generations from now, this is going to be an "old family recipe"...
 
2019-03-10 08:36:30 PM  

Ant: Not quite a whole bottle of wine


I meant to add: it's important to keep a glass back for the chef.
 
2019-03-10 08:55:25 PM  

zeroflight222: Next they'll tell me the mayor of Hamburg gets tired of people ordering Hamburgers.  Or the mayor of Vienna gets mad when someone wants some Vienna Sausages.... and when I ask for a Polish sausage in Poland they just tell me "they're all Polish sausages dumbass."


Or Swiss cheese
 
2019-03-11 08:57:28 AM  
spaghetti exists and bolognese exist, so mixing them together as spaghetti bolognese exists. Italians are farking dumb, like the pasta shape somehow bestows magic, when it's just the same crap in a different shape.
 
2019-03-11 09:01:40 AM  

Bedstead Polisher: Think of regional American BBQ (apparently they're different?)


That parenthetical may result in your corpse never being found if uttered in the wrong company in some parts of the country.

\you have the same cooking instructions as pork
 
2019-03-11 09:02:31 AM  

czetie: lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.


Sadly it's all over Europe, Scandinavia, and the US too.


Lol, no.
 
2019-03-11 09:05:34 AM  

lilistonic: czetie: lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.

Sadly it's all over Europe, Scandinavia, and the US too.

I just think that kind of meat in sauce is gross. When I moved here to Cincinnati and found out about their "chili" that they put on spaghetti, I just wretched.


Cincinnati chili is actually a Greek version of bolognese (filtered somewhat through the Greco-American coney island traditions). It's basically Makaronia me Kima.
https://www.thespruceeats.com/makaron​i​a-me-kima-1705807
 
2019-03-11 09:06:45 AM  

iron de havilland: aerojockey: Of course it exists, Mayor.  Your region invented a sauce.  You don't get to tell people not to use your sauce on whatever pasta they want.

The problem being that what a lot of people call Bolognese sauce is completely unlike any sauce or ragu ever made in Bologna.


Spanish-speakers call roller-coasters Russian Mountains. They weren't invented in Russia. Amusingly, in Russian, they are called American Mountains. (this name does have a veneer of truth)
 
2019-03-11 09:08:38 AM  

waffledonkey: zeroflight222: Next they'll tell me the mayor of Hamburg gets tired of people ordering Hamburgers.  Or the mayor of Vienna gets mad when someone wants some Vienna Sausages.... and when I ask for a Polish sausage in Poland they just tell me "they're all Polish sausages dumbass."

Or Swiss cheese


It must come as news to Emmental that they are no longer a part of Switzerland.
 
2019-03-11 09:16:10 AM  

This text is now purple: lilistonic: czetie: lilistonic: I though only British people ate this and called it ::shudder:: "spag bol," because idk ew.

Sadly it's all over Europe, Scandinavia, and the US too.

I just think that kind of meat in sauce is gross. When I moved here to Cincinnati and found out about their "chili" that they put on spaghetti, I just wretched.

Cincinnati chili is actually a Greek version of bolognese (filtered somewhat through the Greco-American coney island traditions). It's basically Makaronia me Kima.
https://www.thespruceeats.com/makaroni​a-me-kima-1705807


Yes. And if it was better named and not served on top of spaghetti with godawful piles of cheese and whatever else, I probably would just find it an amusing idea. But people here act like it's this amazing specialness, and that on top of the oddness of it is irritating to me.

I do like some of the Greek dishes that have ground or minced meat in them, but only just. I am fussy about meat in general. Mostly I like it barely cooked and not mixed into a lot of other thing unless it is tartare. But I do also like some of the Italian cured meats, though one of the next threads along tells me I should not.
 
2019-03-11 10:22:32 AM  

lilistonic: Cincinnati chili is actually a Greek version of bolognese (filtered somewhat through the Greco-American coney island traditions). It's basically Makaronia me Kima.
https://www.thespruceeats.com/makaroni​a-me-kima-1705807

Yes. And if it was better named and not served on top of spaghetti with godawful piles of cheese and whatever else, I probably would just find it an amusing idea.


That's how it's supposed to be served.
 
2019-03-11 10:38:10 AM  

This text is now purple: lilistonic: Cincinnati chili is actually a Greek version of bolognese (filtered somewhat through the Greco-American coney island traditions). It's basically Makaronia me Kima.
https://www.thespruceeats.com/makaroni​a-me-kima-1705807

Yes. And if it was better named and not served on top of spaghetti with godawful piles of cheese and whatever else, I probably would just find it an amusing idea.

That's how it's supposed to be served.


Yes. Hence all the thoughts and feelings I have on the subject and its preciousness to people who grew up here. I cannot pretend to like every dish, no matter how gleefully it is presented.
 
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