Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)   Tesla now betting it can sell its cars online without test drives. Which raises the question: How does Chrysler ever sells cars AFTER the test drive?   (post-gazette.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, sales approach, Tom Barnes, Real estate, Random Acts, Subscription business model, big risks, Home  
•       •       •

110 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Mar 2019 at 10:41 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2019-03-06 10:48:09 PM  
Because the town and country vans with the 3.8 and stow and go seating are badass, that's why.
 
2019-03-06 10:54:34 PM  
I drove a Charger with a 4.6 Hemi. I farking loved it, I want to get one for myself.
 
2019-03-06 10:59:17 PM  
I can see the other manufacturers getting litigious about this, when they have to go through dealer networks...
 
2019-03-06 11:07:13 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: I can see the other manufacturers getting litigious about this, when they have to go through dealer networks...


You mean the same dealer networks and the rent seeking laws that Tesla has been fighting since they delivered their first cars?

Those networks? Fark em. And the car manufacturers who support them.
 
2019-03-06 11:42:10 PM  
I once test drove a Honda Civic and I was having trouble shifting and I shiat you not the saleman with me says "oh yeah, this one has trouble with second gear. "
 
2019-03-07 12:32:02 AM  
I'm on my second Chrysler 300 and I love them; sad that they're being discontinued.
 
2019-03-07 01:45:10 AM  
I got a Challenger as a rental car. The plastic was so cheap. It smelled like an old 1970s Halloween mask.
 
2019-03-07 02:01:35 AM  
Dealers make nothing on the sale of a new car, the profit is almost entirely in maintenance and finance. Finance is getting much harder as people know to come pre-qual'ed from a bank or credit union.

Electric cars have extremely low maintenance needs, and almost all of that is generic stuff (tires, brakes).

So a Tesla dealer network doesn't make sense, really. And many people are stupid enough to buy a car without a test drive. I would guess Tesla owners make great brand ambassadors, too.
 
2019-03-07 02:27:30 AM  

gingerjet: Dr Jack Badofsky: I can see the other manufacturers getting litigious about this, when they have to go through dealer networks...

You mean the same dealer networks and the rent seeking laws that Tesla has been fighting since they delivered their first cars?

Those networks? Fark em. And the car manufacturers who support them.


They exist because of car manufacturers screwing over non-aligned dealers.  Forcing them to take bad inventory while they opened up a manufacturer dealer closer in to drive them out of business, that sort of thing.
 
2019-03-07 09:32:19 AM  

Any Pie Left: I'm on my second Chrysler 300 and I love them; sad that they're being discontinued.


Who said they are being discontinued?
 
2019-03-07 11:25:51 AM  
Seems to work for Carvana
 
2019-03-07 12:53:40 PM  

Pats_Cloth_Coat: So a Tesla dealer network doesn't make sense, really. And many people are stupid enough to buy a car without a test drive. I would guess Tesla owners make great brand ambassadors, too.


What does a test drive for a new car really tell you?  If there's a manufacturing defect that's detectable during the drive, like odd smells or noises, that should be on the dealer/manufacturer.  General comfort, the position of blind spots, cargo space, and how all the buttons and gadgets work are all things you can tell by just sitting in a demo model in the store.

The only things you should really expect to judge, and that you can only judge in a test drive, are things like acceleration, turning, smoothness of the ride, etc.  But we're not in the wild west days of car ownership, where some cars are whisper smooth and quiet, and others will throw you through the roof if you hit a speed bump.  Most commuter/family cars drive acceptably.  As someone who frequently rents cars for business trips, I have never encountered a mid-grade car that drives so uniquely that it would either make me buy it if I was otherwise unsold, or that would kill the sale for a car that I otherwise wanted.  So what's the point?

In fact, I'd argue that test drives do a disservice to most car buyers.  It's impossible to drive like you normally would in a new car, with a dealer in the seat next to you barking out features and selling points.  And it's a well-worn sales tactic that people are more inclined to buy something if you make it physically more proximate to them - put it actually in their hand, or put them physically in it.  Moreover, it plays upon subtle aspects of our social contract and fear of sunk costs, where we feel morally compelled not to waste the time and effort put into the car experience by both ourselves and the dealer.  These things actually work to override our critical thinking in favor of making the sale, rather than giving us critical information needed to decide whether to purchase.
 
2019-03-07 02:43:03 PM  
I bought my last car online without a test drive or even seeing it in person. Im happy with it.
 
2019-03-07 02:55:40 PM  

Nuuu: Pats_Cloth_Coat: So a Tesla dealer network doesn't make sense, really. And many people are stupid enough to buy a car without a test drive. I would guess Tesla owners make great brand ambassadors, too.

What does a test drive for a new car really tell you?  If there's a manufacturing defect that's detectable during the drive, like odd smells or noises, that should be on the dealer/manufacturer.  General comfort, the position of blind spots, cargo space, and how all the buttons and gadgets work are all things you can tell by just sitting in a demo model in the store.

The only things you should really expect to judge, and that you can only judge in a test drive, are things like acceleration, turning, smoothness of the ride, etc.  But we're not in the wild west days of car ownership, where some cars are whisper smooth and quiet, and others will throw you through the roof if you hit a speed bump.  Most commuter/family cars drive acceptably.  As someone who frequently rents cars for business trips, I have never encountered a mid-grade car that drives so uniquely that it would either make me buy it if I was otherwise unsold, or that would kill the sale for a car that I otherwise wanted.  So what's the point?

In fact, I'd argue that test drives do a disservice to most car buyers.  It's impossible to drive like you normally would in a new car, with a dealer in the seat next to you barking out features and selling points.  And it's a well-worn sales tactic that people are more inclined to buy something if you make it physically more proximate to them - put it actually in their hand, or put them physically in it.  Moreover, it plays upon subtle aspects of our social contract and fear of sunk costs, where we feel morally compelled not to waste the time and effort put into the car experience by both ourselves and the dealer.  These things actually work to override our critical thinking in favor of making the sale, rather than giving us critical information needed to decide whether to purchase.


Aren't there some different options for horsepower levels? And doesn't regenerative braking feel odd?

When I bought my current car, a test drive changed my mind about which of two engines I wanted. The one that got terrible mileage was just so much fun.
 
2019-03-07 03:19:13 PM  

Pats_Cloth_Coat: Nuuu: Pats_Cloth_Coat: ... Aren't there some different options for horsepower levels? And doesn't regenerative braking feel odd?

When I bought my current car, a test drive changed my mind about which of two engines I wanted. The one that got terrible mileage was just so much fun.


Your experience maybe reinforces my point.  Before the test drive, you had an idea in your head about the car you wanted based on a fair consideration of objective facts.  After your test drive, you went for the fun one instead.  The test drive clearly affected your decision to buy the car.  But that's different than saying it would be stupid to go without.  If i'm right, and the test drive is mostly useful to the dealers as a sales tactic to make the purchasing decision more impulsive and emotional, rather than factual and objective, then this could be a good example.  Maybe the smarter decision would have been to get the fuel efficient model with a horsepower that, at least on paper, you deemed acceptable.  Without the test drive, you would have never known the difference.

Of course, my argument mostly applies to your standard daily commuter or family vehicle.  If one of your top objectives for a new car purchase is a fun ride, and you know you're willing to spend money to maximize fun, then you're right, a test drive is absolutely essential.
 
2019-03-07 03:45:23 PM  

Nuuu: It's impossible to drive like you normally would in a new car, with a dealer in the seat next to you barking out features and selling points.


That's why you need to go to a dealer that let's you take the car out for a drive without them.  Oddly enough, I've found this practice to be more common with the luxury dealers.
 
Displayed 16 of 16 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report