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(MSN)   Hospitals and insurers desperate to abort "Medicare for all"   (msn.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Health economics, Medicare, Health insurance, Health care, Medicine, Single-payer health care, Universal health care, single-payer health care system  
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2856 clicks; posted to Politics » on 23 Feb 2019 at 8:52 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-02-23 08:09:58 PM  
Which should tell you everything you need to know.
 
2019-02-23 08:29:06 PM  

Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.


Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.
 
2019-02-23 08:53:50 PM  
Companies whose profits will be hurt by legislation don't want it to pass.

Gee, imagine that.

So, let's not give a flying fark about what they want and do what's best for the American people, not insurance companies and for-profit hospitals.
 
2019-02-23 08:54:39 PM  
Typical rent-seeking behavior. Type of stuff our political system exclusively caters to nowadays.
 
2019-02-23 08:55:31 PM  
Things that should not be as expensive, but are because of corporate shareholders and such like:

1) hospitals
2) ambulances
3) prostitutes
 
2019-02-23 08:56:18 PM  
FTFA: "We have a structure that frankly works for most Americans,"

media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2019-02-23 08:57:31 PM  

WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.


Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed
 
2019-02-23 08:57:58 PM  
Health insurance companies have already outsourced the bulk of their jobs overseas. Those who claim Medicare for all would kill jobs need to be reminded that those jobs exist in far away places and do nothing to contribute to the your local economy.
 
2019-02-23 08:58:19 PM  
As someone who has worked in the healthcare industry for well over a decade, I can tell you that the industry is corrupt from the top down. There are way too many people who are having their palms greased. There's overhead costs tacked onto overhead costs. The corruption is so deeply embedded into America's healthcare industry that it is impossible to gauge the true cost of healthcare, because virtually everybody in every link of the chain is affected, and has something to gain by keeping the system as-is.

They want to kill Medicare-for-All because they're afraid it's going to lead to their paychecks getting smaller. The very notion that the way they've done business up until now is in danger frightens them.
 
2019-02-23 08:59:24 PM  

TheOwnage: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed


You also don't get bills from the surgeon, surgeon's assistant, anesthesiologist, anesthesiologists's assistant, and the anesthesiologit's assistant's assistant on top of the one from the hospital.
 
2019-02-23 09:01:03 PM  
If you can't price gouge the desperate then what is capitalism even for.
 
2019-02-23 09:02:03 PM  
Universal healthcare can't make it to America soon enough. It's a disgrace that we can't provide healthcare for those who need it.
 
2019-02-23 09:03:19 PM  
Let me tell you the moment I decided that I'd be quite fine with outright abolition of private health insurance.

It was a year and a half ago.

I get insurance through my employer.  It's a normal insurance plan, that I pay roughly 10% of my pre-tax income towards.

Mrs. Silverstaff slips on something on the stairs late one night and takes a tumble.  She lands bad and thinks she's broken her ankle. . .she can't move it, it's in extreme pain, there's a lot of swelling.

So, we go to the emergency room.  It was about 11 at night, not like we could have done much else besides call an ambulance. . .and I could get her there in my car without the need for an ambulance.

The attending physician at the ER, a specialist in emergency medicine, agrees, from his examination it's probably broken. . .but to be 100% sure, let's take an X-ray.

. . .from the X-ray, it turns out it's not actually broken, it's just a severe sprain.  The ER gives Mrs. Silverstaff some crutches and instructions to rest it, put ice on it and elevate it, take some OTC ibuprofen and rest her ankle for a while.

Our insurer refused to pay a dime of it, said we "abused" the emergency room by going to an ER when we should have gone to a primary care physician for treatment of a routine sprained ankle.

So, I lodged an appeal. . .with the insurance company, which denied it (of course).  Their logic?  The final diagnosis was "sprain", which meant that no matter how or why we ended up there, the final diagnosis meant that it wasn't an emergency, and thus under their policies, they refuse to pay a dime towards any of the care.

So, the hospital now comes after us for several thousand dollars in ER bills. . .and if we don't pay, under state law they can just seize our state tax returns.  We owe more to the hospital than my take-home pay in a month (and money's already tight).

That was the moment I became a full-on, Medicare for all, abolish private health insurance socialist, and proudly so.

I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Fark health insurance companies, fark em all.

Single payer now, single payer forever.
 
2019-02-23 09:03:25 PM  

TheOwnage: WTFDYW: V.
Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed


No you don't. You spend a lot less.

oecd.orgView Full Size
 
2019-02-23 09:03:52 PM  

TheOwnage: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed


I pay $115.00 a week for my co-premium. Local, state and federal taxes on top of that. I'd gladly give another  $20.00 a week for healthcare for all instead of what I'm paying now.  Don't get me started on co-pays.
 
2019-02-23 09:03:59 PM  
They have hired a top lieutenant in Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign to spearhead the effort.

I guess there's no need to worry, then.
 
2019-02-23 09:04:02 PM  
For-profit health care corporations want Medicare-for-all to die. What they really want is for the healthy to pay them dividends and for the sick to die without getting any care.
 
2019-02-23 09:05:47 PM  
TFA says that their opinion is that the ACA is "working reasonably well". Reasonably well is a step, not a goal, you asshats.
 
2019-02-23 09:07:53 PM  

WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.


You actually make a lot more than you think.  Your raises since 1999 have largely gone to pay for increases in health insurance premiums.  Under Medicare for all, your "premiums" would be some 60% less than they are now, and if your employer covers that cost (less than they pay now for high deductible insurance), you still potentially get a massive pay raise of the difference.
Medicare for all will also enable older skilled workers to more easily transition to consultants or part time work.
Of course we can't have that because tens of thousands of paper pushers, from medical records, billing, and debt collection would be out of work.  Apparently that's bad, and makes politicians upset as well.  It would also yank hundreds of billions in wasted money going to the idle rich who have ruined health care.
/time to take the punch bowl away folks, it's killing the economy.
 
2019-02-23 09:08:38 PM  

Silverstaff: Let me tell you the moment I decided that I'd be quite fine with outright abolition of private health insurance.

It was a year and a half ago.

I get insurance through my employer.  It's a normal insurance plan, that I pay roughly 10% of my pre-tax income towards.

Mrs. Silverstaff slips on something on the stairs late one night and takes a tumble.  She lands bad and thinks she's broken her ankle. . .she can't move it, it's in extreme pain, there's a lot of swelling.

So, we go to the emergency room.  It was about 11 at night, not like we could have done much else besides call an ambulance. . .and I could get her there in my car without the need for an ambulance.

The attending physician at the ER, a specialist in emergency medicine, agrees, from his examination it's probably broken. . .but to be 100% sure, let's take an X-ray.

. . .from the X-ray, it turns out it's not actually broken, it's just a severe sprain.  The ER gives Mrs. Silverstaff some crutches and instructions to rest it, put ice on it and elevate it, take some OTC ibuprofen and rest her ankle for a while.

Our insurer refused to pay a dime of it, said we "abused" the emergency room by going to an ER when we should have gone to a primary care physician for treatment of a routine sprained ankle.

So, I lodged an appeal. . .with the insurance company, which denied it (of course).  Their logic?  The final diagnosis was "sprain", which meant that no matter how or why we ended up there, the final diagnosis meant that it wasn't an emergency, and thus under their policies, they refuse to pay a dime towards any of the care.

So, the hospital now comes after us for several thousand dollars in ER bills. . .and if we don't pay, under state law they can just seize our state tax returns.  We owe more to the hospital than my take-home pay in a month (and money's already tight).

That was the moment I became a full-on, Medicare for all, abolish private health insurance socialist, and proudly so.

I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Fark health insurance companies, fark em all.

Single payer now, single payer forever.


Right. But think of the impact th insurance company paying your bills would have had on shareholder value.

Why do you have to be so selfish?

/sarcasm off
 
2019-02-23 09:08:41 PM  

TheOwnage: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed


He's right, but Canadians biatch about healthcare too.  For example, I was shocked and appalled to get a $70 bill in the mail for an ambulance ride.

/real 1st world problems
 
2019-02-23 09:09:33 PM  

Weatherkiss: They want to kill Medicare-for-All because they're afraid it's going to lead to their paychecks getting smaller. The very notion that the way they've done business up until now is in danger frightens them.


GOOD.

They should be afraid.  If they're afraid, they know it'll happen.  When they see polls saying that around 70% of the US population wants is, including half of Republicans, they know their days are numbered.

Good.  They SHOULD be afraid.  They're the dinosaurs seeing the meteor striking.

Funny thing is, if the GOP hadn't tried so goddamn hard to sabotage the ACA, we might not have gotten to Medicare For All.

If the ACA was implemented as intended, with universal Medicaid expansions, proper subsidies, proper heavily regulation of what's covered ect. . .then it would have at least been far better. . .but this death-by-a-thousand-cuts they've given it has made people angry. . .and now they're at the point of demanding single-payer.

GOP couldn't leave well enough alone.  The corporate friendly ACA could have been enough. . .but stigginit meant they couldn't let that happen, so now the torches and pitchforks come out for the health-grift industry.

/I've said for a while the US does NOT have a healthcare industry.
//We have a healthcare billing industry which incidentally produces healthcare as a byproduct.
///There's a surcharge for the 3rd slashie.
 
2019-02-23 09:09:46 PM  

Silverstaff: Let me tell you the moment I decided that I'd be quite fine with outright abolition of private health insurance.

It was a year and a half ago.

I get insurance through my employer.  It's a normal insurance plan, that I pay roughly 10% of my pre-tax income towards.

Mrs. Silverstaff slips on something on the stairs late one night and takes a tumble.  She lands bad and thinks she's broken her ankle. . .she can't move it, it's in extreme pain, there's a lot of swelling.

So, we go to the emergency room.  It was about 11 at night, not like we could have done much else besides call an ambulance. . .and I could get her there in my car without the need for an ambulance.

The attending physician at the ER, a specialist in emergency medicine, agrees, from his examination it's probably broken. . .but to be 100% sure, let's take an X-ray.

. . .from the X-ray, it turns out it's not actually broken, it's just a severe sprain.  The ER gives Mrs. Silverstaff some crutches and instructions to rest it, put ice on it and elevate it, take some OTC ibuprofen and rest her ankle for a while.

Our insurer refused to pay a dime of it, said we "abused" the emergency room by going to an ER when we should have gone to a primary care physician for treatment of a routine sprained ankle.

So, I lodged an appeal. . .with the insurance company, which denied it (of course).  Their logic?  The final diagnosis was "sprain", which meant that no matter how or why we ended up there, the final diagnosis meant that it wasn't an emergency, and thus under their policies, they refuse to pay a dime towards any of the care.

So, the hospital now comes after us for several thousand dollars in ER bills. . .and if we don't pay, under state law they can just seize our state tax returns.  We owe more to the hospital than my take-home pay in a month (and money's already tight).

That was the moment I became a full-on, Medicare for all, abolish private health insurance socialist, and proudly so.

I pay hundreds of ...


I've posted on other threads about my college buddy visiting us in Northern ON, Canada who had to have an emergency bowel resection + 4 days in ICU + 15 days in a semi-private room.  His total for all of that was less than your wife's ER visit.  I'm not talking his share after insurance, that was his total bill.
 
2019-02-23 09:10:24 PM  

Sophont: TheOwnage: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

Canadian here... I pay probably what you do in premiums as taxes. I can't be the denied care, turned away, lifetime maces, told I'm at the wrong hospital, etc etc etc.

Fox just has you guys brainwashed

You also don't get bills from the surgeon, surgeon's assistant, anesthesiologist, anesthesiologists's assistant, and the anesthesiologit's assistant's assistant on top of the one from the hospital.


True. I spent four days in hospital for minor intestinal issue. The only thing I had to show was my provincial health card when I got to emergency. When I went back home there was no bill, no insurance claim to fill out, nothing at all.
 
2019-02-23 09:11:14 PM  
Expand Medicare to cover everyone. Charge an income-based premium. Leave the private system in place for the rubes who fear the sosshulizms.

Japan has had this system for decades and it works fine. There, problem solved. You all owe me a beer
 
2019-02-23 09:13:37 PM  
If you have "insurance" nowadays, it just means you make a payment that allows you to carry a card that allows you to claim you have insurance. With a $5,700 deductible, might as well not bother.
Life in the USA is a bad joke.
 
2019-02-23 09:14:20 PM  

puffy999: Things that should not be as expensive, but are because of corporate shareholders and such like:

1) hospitals
2) ambulances
3) prostitutes


Haha, funny anecdote time!  Just this month had to take an ambulance ride from one hospital to another to have a procedure done that the first hospital couldn't do.  28 miles of non-emergency ambulance ride adds up to a bill of $1800 dollars.
 
2019-02-23 09:14:52 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-02-23 09:15:25 PM  

ThunderPelvis: Expand Medicare to cover everyone. Charge an income-based premium. Leave the private system in place for the rubes who fear the sosshulizms.

Japan has had this system for decades and it works fine. There, problem solved. You all owe me a beer


When it happens, I will be overjoyed to pay up.  Hell, I may even be able to afford it at that point.
 
2019-02-23 09:16:17 PM  
Nobody should live in fear of going bankrupt due to medical bills. Many people are one illness away from that. We also need to have mandatory paid time off, so if we get sick we won't end up homeless because we can't pay the rent or mortgage. Crowdfunding for healthcare and living expenses during medical reatment shouldn't even exist. WTF, America? Why do we put up with this?
 
2019-02-23 09:16:24 PM  
The richest country in the world spends the most on healthcare per capita.  The system is working exactly as designed.  Healthcare companies are in business to be profitable. Providing healthcare for all will never be a profitable; which is why the US of A will never have universal healthcare.
 
2019-02-23 09:19:56 PM  
Sooner or later if this doesn't change executives are going to start getting friendly knocks from the terminally ill. And nobody's going to care if little Cody and Brittany go too, either. War is war
 
2019-02-23 09:21:18 PM  
Step 1: affordable college so M.D. is not only obtainable by those who can afford it or is expecting a salary that will offset the insane loans.
Step 2: public research will no longer be available to private companies that do not all there to profit caps
Step 3: Medicare for all

We live in THE country where health is a for-profit industry, and we suffer for it.
 
2019-02-23 09:23:56 PM  

Silverstaff: Let me tell you the moment I decided that I'd be quite fine with outright abolition of private health insurance.

It was a year and a half ago.

I get insurance through my employer.  It's a normal insurance plan, that I pay roughly 10% of my pre-tax income towards.

Mrs. Silverstaff slips on something on the stairs late one night and takes a tumble.  She lands bad and thinks she's broken her ankle. . .she can't move it, it's in extreme pain, there's a lot of swelling.

So, we go to the emergency room.  It was about 11 at night, not like we could have done much else besides call an ambulance. . .and I could get her there in my car without the need for an ambulance.

The attending physician at the ER, a specialist in emergency medicine, agrees, from his examination it's probably broken. . .but to be 100% sure, let's take an X-ray.

. . .from the X-ray, it turns out it's not actually broken, it's just a severe sprain.  The ER gives Mrs. Silverstaff some crutches and instructions to rest it, put ice on it and elevate it, take some OTC ibuprofen and rest her ankle for a while.

Our insurer refused to pay a dime of it, said we "abused" the emergency room by going to an ER when we should have gone to a primary care physician for treatment of a routine sprained ankle.

So, I lodged an appeal. . .with the insurance company, which denied it (of course).  Their logic?  The final diagnosis was "sprain", which meant that no matter how or why we ended up there, the final diagnosis meant that it wasn't an emergency, and thus under their policies, they refuse to pay a dime towards any of the care.

So, the hospital now comes after us for several thousand dollars in ER bills. . .and if we don't pay, under state law they can just seize our state tax returns.  We owe more to the hospital than my take-home pay in a month (and money's already tight).

That was the moment I became a full-on, Medicare for all, abolish private health insurance socialist, and proudly so.

I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Fark health insurance companies, fark em all.

Single payer now, single payer forever.


That sounds pretty old school. Hell, denying ER at all is old school. If someone is abusing you engage them through whatever ER diversion programs they have.

Mind if I ask the insurer?
 
2019-02-23 09:24:09 PM  

Arumat: puffy999: Things that should not be as expensive, but are because of corporate shareholders and such like:

1) hospitals
2) ambulances
3) prostitutes

Haha, funny anecdote time!  Just this month had to take an ambulance ride from one hospital to another to have a procedure done that the first hospital couldn't do.  28 miles of non-emergency ambulance ride adds up to a bill of $1800 dollars.


You got lucky. Life-Flight is like 15k a mile.
 
2019-02-23 09:25:14 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Health insurance companies have already outsourced the bulk of their jobs overseas. Those who claim Medicare for all would kill jobs need to be reminded that those jobs exist in far away places and do nothing to contribute to the your local economy.


exactly as many as they could overseas and  pocket the savings in Salary they have done so.
 
2019-02-23 09:27:46 PM  

GlamrLama: The richest country in the world spends the most on healthcare per capita.  The system is working exactly as designed.  Healthcare companies are in business to be profitable. Providing healthcare for all will never be a profitable; which is why the US of A will never have universal healthcare.


That's why we tear the goddamn system down.  Rip it apart.  Wreck it.  Break it.

I don't give a flying fark if anyone makes a profit.  Those companies can burn for all I care.  Not everything is supposed to be goddamn for profit.

Yes, some people will lose jobs, and that's sad, and some stock portfolios will take in the nuts, and that sucks. . .but an obsolete business model based around predatory business practices has to collapse sometime.

We'll have universal healthcare even if we have to do it over the broken corporate bodies of United Health, Kaiser, Aetna, Cigna et al.

The people are getting dangerously close to torches-and-pitchforks on this issue.
 
2019-02-23 09:29:46 PM  

BlazeTrailer: That sounds pretty old school. Hell, denying ER at all is old school. If someone is abusing you engage them through whatever ER diversion programs they have.

Mind if I ask the insurer?


Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield. . .Kentucky Employees Health Plan.

It's a policy they implemented in early 2017 (not long after Trump took over, imagine that) where they could, in their sole discretion, refuse to cover any emergency room treatment if they deemed it to be "abuse" of the ER.

Here's a story from CBS news about the mayhem that policy is causing:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/anthem-a​m​ong-health-insurers-refusing-to-pay-er​-bills-doctors-say/
 
2019-02-23 09:30:25 PM  

Silverstaff: GlamrLama: The richest country in the world spends the most on healthcare per capita.  The system is working exactly as designed.  Healthcare companies are in business to be profitable. Providing healthcare for all will never be a profitable; which is why the US of A will never have universal healthcare.

That's why we tear the goddamn system down.  Rip it apart.  Wreck it.  Break it.

I don't give a flying fark if anyone makes a profit.  Those companies can burn for all I care.  Not everything is supposed to be goddamn for profit.

Yes, some people will lose jobs, and that's sad, and some stock portfolios will take in the nuts, and that sucks. . .but an obsolete business model based around predatory business practices has to collapse sometime.

We'll have universal healthcare even if we have to do it over the broken corporate bodies of United Health, Kaiser, Aetna, Cigna et al.

The people are getting dangerously close to torches-and-pitchforks on this issue.


This. If I found myself with something terminal and knowing that my insurance wouldn't cover it, why not pay some of these assholes a visit?
 
2019-02-23 09:31:40 PM  

BlazeTrailer: Silverstaff: Let me tell you the moment I decided that I'd be quite fine with outright abolition of private health insurance.

It was a year and a half ago.

I get insurance through my employer.  It's a normal insurance plan, that I pay roughly 10% of my pre-tax income towards.

Mrs. Silverstaff slips on something on the stairs late one night and takes a tumble.  She lands bad and thinks she's broken her ankle. . .she can't move it, it's in extreme pain, there's a lot of swelling.

So, we go to the emergency room.  It was about 11 at night, not like we could have done much else besides call an ambulance. . .and I could get her there in my car without the need for an ambulance.

The attending physician at the ER, a specialist in emergency medicine, agrees, from his examination it's probably broken. . .but to be 100% sure, let's take an X-ray.

. . .from the X-ray, it turns out it's not actually broken, it's just a severe sprain.  The ER gives Mrs. Silverstaff some crutches and instructions to rest it, put ice on it and elevate it, take some OTC ibuprofen and rest her ankle for a while.

Our insurer refused to pay a dime of it, said we "abused" the emergency room by going to an ER when we should have gone to a primary care physician for treatment of a routine sprained ankle.

So, I lodged an appeal. . .with the insurance company, which denied it (of course).  Their logic?  The final diagnosis was "sprain", which meant that no matter how or why we ended up there, the final diagnosis meant that it wasn't an emergency, and thus under their policies, they refuse to pay a dime towards any of the care.

So, the hospital now comes after us for several thousand dollars in ER bills. . .and if we don't pay, under state law they can just seize our state tax returns.  We owe more to the hospital than my take-home pay in a month (and money's already tight).

That was the moment I became a full-on, Medicare for all, abolish private health insurance socialist, and proudly so.

I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Fark health insurance companies, fark em all.

Single payer now, single payer forever.

That sounds pretty old school. Hell, denying ER at all is old school. If someone is abusing you engage them through whatever ER diversion programs they have.

Mind if I ask the insurer?


Csb
I use BCBS. I have ongoing medications that, barring a breakthrough, I will likely take until I die. All are generics. BCBS keeps trying to get me to sign up for a Prescription Medication Coach. I keep telling them that my doctor does that.

2 days ago I got a letter from them saying that I am automatically enrolled in in that program now. I now get to figure out how to opt out of the program. They gave an 800 number to call. I still haven't talked to a human and there is no way to opt out in my online account. Very fun.

End Csb
 
2019-02-23 09:32:24 PM  
There's a parable you learn when you're a kid about 'killing the golden goose,' I guess these folks never heard it.
 
2019-02-23 09:32:27 PM  

pxlboy: Silverstaff: GlamrLama: The richest country in the world spends the most on healthcare per capita.  The system is working exactly as designed.  Healthcare companies are in business to be profitable. Providing healthcare for all will never be a profitable; which is why the US of A will never have universal healthcare.

That's why we tear the goddamn system down.  Rip it apart.  Wreck it.  Break it.

I don't give a flying fark if anyone makes a profit.  Those companies can burn for all I care.  Not everything is supposed to be goddamn for profit.

Yes, some people will lose jobs, and that's sad, and some stock portfolios will take in the nuts, and that sucks. . .but an obsolete business model based around predatory business practices has to collapse sometime.

We'll have universal healthcare even if we have to do it over the broken corporate bodies of United Health, Kaiser, Aetna, Cigna et al.

The people are getting dangerously close to torches-and-pitchforks on this issue.

This. If I found myself with something terminal and knowing that my insurance wouldn't cover it, why not pay some of these assholes a visit?


Archer ... RAMPAGE!
Youtube 5cR-WiGKZtg
 
2019-02-23 09:32:37 PM  
There are an enormous number of people in the Armed Forces for the sole or primary reason that the health care is taken care of, for you and your dependents, for the duration of your service (plus a remarkably good deal afterwards, in theory, if you serve 20+). I'm one of them. Dealing with health insurance is legitimately scarier than the thought of being shot at.
 
TWX
2019-02-23 09:35:36 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Health insurance companies have already outsourced the bulk of their jobs overseas. Those who claim Medicare for all would kill jobs need to be reminded that those jobs exist in far away places and do nothing to contribute to the your local economy.


In a nutshell, it still takes some kind of bureaucracy to figure out billing at the provider end and to basically audit the billing at the payment side of the transaction.

Those kinds of jobs will still exist in a single-payer system, because providers will not be direct employees of the government.

The parts of the equation that will go away will be the shareholders and the upper management of insurance companies.

If many healthcare billing processing jobs are overseas now, those jobs might actually return, at least from what had been the insurance side, because it's likely that legislation for that would require it to be handled domestically.
 
2019-02-23 09:36:12 PM  

Northern: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

You actually make a lot more than you think.  Your raises since 1999 have largely gone to pay for increases in health insurance premiums.  Under Medicare for all, your "premiums" would be some 60% less than they are now, and if your employer covers that cost (less than they pay now for high deductible insurance), you still potentially get a massive pay raise of the difference.
Medicare for all will also enable older skilled workers to more easily transition to consultants or part time work.
Of course we can't have that because tens of thousands of paper pushers, from medical records, billing, and debt collection would be out of work.  Apparently that's bad, and makes politicians upset as well.  It would also yank hundreds of billions in wasted money going to the idle rich who have ruined health care.
/time to take the punch bowl away folks, it's killing the economy.


Please read this article.  Warning, take your blood pressure meds if need be first.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/29/ma​g​azine/those-indecipherable-medical-bil​ls-theyre-one-reason-health-care-costs​-so-much.html

I know I sound like Alex Jones on an ether binge, especially when I suggest reading the comments on that article from doctors, lawyers, patients, etc, but the AMA (yes the American Medical Association) is the prime villain in our nation's health care debacle.

If it weren't for their medical code extortion scheme we'd be like Germany's Bismarck model, where no one goes medically bankrupt.

/single payer is fine too.
//if I met Bernie Sanders or Paul Ryan I'd show them that same article because they'd be outraged for different reasons.
WHY IS NO ONE TALKING ABOUT THIS?
 
2019-02-23 09:38:05 PM  
I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Somehow, for-profit health-insurance companies appear to have cash not only to cover their executive and management staffs salaries, and their marketing departments' comedic television ads, but to pay armies of functionaries tasked with denying their customers the services for which they've paid.
 
2019-02-23 09:39:16 PM  

Silverstaff: BlazeTrailer: That sounds pretty old school. Hell, denying ER at all is old school. If someone is abusing you engage them through whatever ER diversion programs they have.

Mind if I ask the insurer?

Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield. . .Kentucky Employees Health Plan.

It's a policy they implemented in early 2017 (not long after Trump took over, imagine that) where they could, in their sole discretion, refuse to cover any emergency room treatment if they deemed it to be "abuse" of the ER.

Here's a story from CBS news about the mayhem that policy is causing:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/anthem-am​ong-health-insurers-refusing-to-pay-er​-bills-doctors-say/


Guy in work with got hit with that. He sliced open his hand in the afternoon on a weekend (at home). Lots of blood. Went to ER, got stitched up. Insurance company said he should have gone to urgent care and refused the bill. He is fighting in court now. Seriously, if you have enough blood coming out that uninjured parts of your body start sticking to things.... I think that warrants an ER visit
 
2019-02-23 09:39:35 PM  
He is also on BCBS.
 
2019-02-23 09:42:13 PM  

Jeff73: Northern: WTFDYW: Virtually_Human: Which should tell you everything you need to know.

Hospital administration and their shareholders as well as health insurance companies need to DIAF. I don't make a lot of money but would gladly pay a little higher tax for healthcare for all since every other working person would be also.

You actually make a lot more than you think.  Your raises since 1999 have largely gone to pay for increases in health insurance premiums.  Under Medicare for all, your "premiums" would be some 60% less than they are now, and if your employer covers that cost (less than they pay now for high deductible insurance), you still potentially get a massive pay raise of the difference.
Medicare for all will also enable older skilled workers to more easily transition to consultants or part time work.
Of course we can't have that because tens of thousands of paper pushers, from medical records, billing, and debt collection would be out of work.  Apparently that's bad, and makes politicians upset as well.  It would also yank hundreds of billions in wasted money going to the idle rich who have ruined health care.
/time to take the punch bowl away folks, it's killing the economy.

Please read this article.  Warning, take your blood pressure meds if need be first.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/29/mag​azine/those-indecipherable-medical-bil​ls-theyre-one-reason-health-care-costs​-so-much.html

I know I sound like Alex Jones on an ether binge, especially when I suggest reading the comments on that article from doctors, lawyers, patients, etc, but the AMA (yes the American Medical Association) is the prime villain in our nation's health care debacle.

If it weren't for their medical code extortion scheme we'd be like Germany's Bismarck model, where no one goes medically bankrupt.

/single payer is fine too.
//if I met Bernie Sanders or Paul Ryan I'd show them that same article because they'd be outraged for different reasons.
WHY IS NO ONE TALKING ABOUT THIS?


An ether binge is more fun.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-02-23 09:44:52 PM  

BuckTurgidson: I pay hundreds of dollars a month in insurance. . .and when I actually need it in a medical emergency they search for an excuse to not pay and then tell me it's my fault for "abusing" the system in seeking treatment instead of just psychically knowing it was a sprain and acting accordingly.

Somehow, for-profit health-insurance companies appear to have cash not only to cover their executive and management staffs salaries, and their marketing departments' comedic television ads, but to pay armies of functionaries tasked with denying their customers the services for which they've paid.


Read/ watch The Rainmaker. It was general practice up to the early 90s for insurance companies to flat refuse the first claim.
 
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