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(NPR)   Increase in violins causes a sudden change for an Italian town   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Violin, Antonio Stradivari, Luthier, Amati, concert hall of the Violin Museum, Stradivarius, instrument's inimitable sound, Cello  
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2703 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2019 at 1:18 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2019-02-18 07:25:10 PM  
It is worth it just to open your ears/technology measurement of the sounds.  Max volume https://www.nytimes.com/2019/0​1/17/art​s/music/stradivarius-sound-bank-record​ing-cremona.html
 
2019-02-18 07:36:01 PM  
What's all this fuss I keep hearing about violins on Television? I say there should be more violins on television and less game shows.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-02-18 08:05:12 PM  
Wasn't just Stradivari in Cremona. My German fiddle is based on an Amati and has a different belly than a Strad copy. My research paper in high school was on the secrets of violin-making in Cremona. Before the Googles and Amazon. Lots of inter-library loan and notecards.

Cremona is on my bucket list.
 
2019-02-18 09:31:23 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Wasn't just Stradivari in Cremona. My German fiddle is based on an Amati and has a different belly than a Strad copy. My research paper in high school was on the secrets of violin-making in Cremona. Before the Googles and Amazon. Lots of inter-library loan and notecards.

Cremona is on my bucket list.


Check out High Strung on Netflix if you haven't already. You may appreciate it.
 
2019-02-18 10:13:59 PM  

FlyingFarmer: ecmoRandomNumbers: Wasn't just Stradivari in Cremona. My German fiddle is based on an Amati and has a different belly than a Strad copy. My research paper in high school was on the secrets of violin-making in Cremona. Before the Googles and Amazon. Lots of inter-library loan and notecards.

Cremona is on my bucket list.

Check out High Strung on Netflix if you haven't already. You may appreciate it.


I will.
 
2019-02-19 01:23:43 AM  
At least it wasn't gratuitous sax.
 
2019-02-19 01:35:11 AM  
Bah, it's all just hype. Just do a fast Fourier analysis on the damn things and 3D print replacements out of unicornium.and the pruned branches of Yggdrasil.
 
2019-02-19 01:45:33 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: Bah, it's all just hype. Just do a fast Fourier analysis on the damn things and 3D print replacements out of unicornium.and the pruned branches of Yggdrasil.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2019-02-19 02:11:06 AM  
But in 200 years will they even have the tech to listen to the recordings?
 
2019-02-19 02:18:56 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: At least it wasn't gratuitous sax.


Epic sax guy 10 hours
Youtube kxopViU98Xo
 
2019-02-19 02:50:19 AM  
Kinky!
 
2019-02-19 02:52:19 AM  
Is it just me or does anybody else notice that stories on NPR end abruptly?

I love the violin & the cello, just wish I could play them.
 
2019-02-19 02:59:38 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: Bah, it's all just hype. Just do a fast Fourier analysis on the damn things and 3D print replacements out of unicornium.and the pruned branches of Yggdrasil.


The makeup of symphony orchestra string instruments is going to change greatly in the next few decades. There's a luthier company out of Boston called Luis & Clark. They've perfected a process for making orchestral string instruments out of carbon fiber. They started with cellos and moved to violins, basses, and violas. One of the guys (either Luis or Clark) was on a friend's boat and went below deck to lie down and noticed how the carbon-fiber hull made all the noises resonate.

Long story short -- he starts experimenting with layers of carbon fiber to make a cello body, neck and scroll. Then, seeing that wooden pegs weren't going to work for tuning, he used fixed pegs with gears, but kept a wooden bridge (easily adjustable) and a wooden soundpost (resonant, but also dampens imperfections and suppresses "wolf tones" from inside).

Yo Yo Ma's favorite cello is his Luis & Clark carbon fiber instrument. I want one so bad it's not funny. They're like $5,500. My first violin professor in college had a 150-year old French instrument that cost her a cool $25K and a French bow that cost $4,000. You can play a carbon-fiber fiddle with a carbon-fiber bow that sounds (in my opinion, better than a Strad) for less than $6,000.

The principal cellist of the New Orleans Symphony was evacuated and had to leave her carbon-fiber cello behind. It sat in water for weeks until she could go back. She sent it to Luis & Clark. They fitted her a new bridge, soundpost and replaced the strings. And then cleaned it with Windex. Brand new.

And they did it for free because of what she'd been through.

Strads, Amatis, Guarnieris are all traditional Cremona luthiers and their instruments are works of art and worth literally several times more than their weight in gold. However, modern technology is putting that kind of sound in the hands of people who could only dream of wielding that kind of power. Having a good instrument makes it exciting to play great works, and it's making the great works more democratic and not a bourgeois hobby.

My Mexican 6th-graders in Phoenix LOVED Mozart and Vivaldi. They REALLY liked Mozart. And they liked how I presented history as story time. My 6th-grade general music curriculum was Music in the Movies for the entire year. Part of making a great society is forcing the bourgeoisie to understand that they don't own the belles arts. Frasier Crane I am not. My Junior High orchestra LOVED Vivaldi. The repetition makes it a relatively easy endeavor for fiddlers, and they love playing it

Strad-quality instruments can be had for the price of a used car. I think that's fantastic. Democratize orchestral music. You'll get incredible results.
Incredible high school musicians from Venezuela! | Gustavo Dudamel
Youtube amSqQ5XNaGE

Gustavo Dudamel is now director of the Los Angeles Phil.
 
2019-02-19 04:29:54 AM  
Enter deejay...
wiki.shoryuken.comView Full Size
 
2019-02-19 05:13:25 AM  
If you're going to record music for synth purposes, it certainly doesn't hurt to start with recording the best instruments of that type that you can find.  Putting them in a form that's a lot better at surviving over time than wood, and can be easily be sent just about anywhere in a few seconds?  Ok, hard to find too much to argue with here.  Good on them.
 
2019-02-19 05:43:45 AM  
I've got a 19th century Guarneri copy, wish I could do justice to it. I can scrape out a few tunes but I only started at 40, I think you really need to start about ten.
 
2019-02-19 06:29:39 AM  

domo_kun_sai: But in 200 years will they even have the tech to listen to the recordings?


That's the issue with lots of digital storage. I'm closing in on 60, my first computer programs were "digitized" onto punch cards. I've kept a USB 3.5" floppy drive and a LS-120 drive from an old tower computer. I've got years worth of CDs and DVDs, but some of them are already not working.
 
2019-02-19 07:08:13 AM  

Madman drummers bummers: At least it wasn't gratuitous sax.


img.fark.netView Full Size

Making music with a 😸
...is always better than...
         Grab them by the 😾
 
2019-02-19 08:00:56 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: If you're going to record music for synth purposes, it certainly doesn't hurt to start with recording the best instruments of that type that you can find.  Putting them in a form that's a lot better at surviving over time than wood, and can be easily be sent just about anywhere in a few seconds?  Ok, hard to find too much to argue with here.  Good on them.


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/sc​i​ence/phenomena/2014/04/07/stradivarius​-violins-arent-better-than-new-ones-ro​und-two/

Except they aren't the best.

The notion of "the best" also changes over time - the timbre that is most pleasing can easily change from one generation to the next.  Add in modern technology, the aging process, etc...well, you get the idea.
 
2019-02-19 09:00:31 AM  
Roger Taylor - No Violins (1981)
Youtube aqd2H4exuXk
 
2019-02-19 10:15:48 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Pointy Tail of Satan: Bah, it's all just hype. Just do a fast Fourier analysis on the damn things and 3D print replacements out of unicornium.and the pruned branches of Yggdrasil.

The makeup of symphony orchestra string instruments is going to change greatly in the next few decades. There's a luthier company out of Boston called Luis & Clark. They've perfected a process for making orchestral string instruments out of carbon fiber. They started with cellos and moved to violins, basses, and violas. One of the guys (either Luis or Clark) was on a friend's boat and went below deck to lie down and noticed how the carbon-fiber hull made all the noises resonate.

Long story short -- he starts experimenting with layers of carbon fiber to make a cello body, neck and scroll. Then, seeing that wooden pegs weren't going to work for tuning, he used fixed pegs with gears, but kept a wooden bridge (easily adjustable) and a wooden soundpost (resonant, but also dampens imperfections and suppresses "wolf tones" from inside).

Yo Yo Ma's favorite cello is his Luis & Clark carbon fiber instrument. I want one so bad it's not funny. They're like $5,500. My first violin professor in college had a 150-year old French instrument that cost her a cool $25K and a French bow that cost $4,000. You can play a carbon-fiber fiddle with a carbon-fiber bow that sounds (in my opinion, better than a Strad) for less than $6,000.

The principal cellist of the New Orleans Symphony was evacuated and had to leave her carbon-fiber cello behind. It sat in water for weeks until she could go back. She sent it to Luis & Clark. They fitted her a new bridge, soundpost and replaced the strings. And then cleaned it with Windex. Brand new.

And they did it for free because of what she'd been through.

Strads, Amatis, Guarnieris are all traditional Cremona luthiers and their instruments are works of art and worth literally several times more than their weight in gold. However, modern technology is putting that kind o ...


My Mother plays cello, and a couple years ago had her 100+ year old German instrument (Saxony) restored. The Luthier ended up suggesting a carbon-fiber bow since her original had flattened out. She couldn't be happier with the weight and the way it responds. These days, now that she's performing in public again, she's started playing a Yamaha electric cello, since it's much more portable and she can easily control the volume and balance against her fellow players. Times indeed have changed for traditional instruments.
 
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