Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Raw Story)   Time travel is possible, but only if you have infinite mass. Well, I've been off my diet for a while now   (rawstory.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Time travel, concept of time travel, Caroline Mallary, past history, time machine, notion of time travel, proximity of a black hole, Stephen Hawking  
•       •       •

923 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Dec 2018 at 9:42 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-12-13 08:16:13 AM  
pics.me.meView Full Size
 
2018-12-13 08:48:26 AM  
You can always tell the bodies asymptotically approaching infinite mass by their choice of dark clothes or vertical stripes...
 
2018-12-13 08:49:50 AM  
Your mamma's so fat, this joke is a recursive time loop because your mamma's so fat, this joke is a recursive time loop because your mamma's so fat...
 
2018-12-13 08:52:16 AM  
Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.
 
2018-12-13 08:59:50 AM  
Lena Dunham can time travel?
 
2018-12-13 09:22:32 AM  
An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.
 
2018-12-13 09:29:37 AM  

sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.


So if one impossible thing happens, it makes other impossible things happen.

There's a life lesson in there somewhere, but I have no idea what it is.
 
2018-12-13 09:44:34 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
"Well. Always a good time for a cheese and pickle sarnie, innit?"
 
2018-12-13 10:19:46 AM  

foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.


No were not....relatively speaking.
 
2018-12-13 10:21:34 AM  
or huge planets.
 
2018-12-13 10:21:56 AM  
What if I counter-balanced my mass with a black hole?
 
2018-12-13 10:23:08 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Your mamma's so fat, this joke is a recursive time loop because your mamma's so fat, this joke is a recursive time loop because your mamma's so fat...


pete and repete were sitting on a fence
pete fell off
who was left?
 
2018-12-13 10:24:17 AM  

foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.


im currently now in your future then.
 
2018-12-13 10:25:43 AM  

sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.


but mankind has decided that nothing can go faster than light.
 
2018-12-13 10:26:04 AM  

sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.


Since about 5th grade when I learned about relativity explained in simple terms, I became comvinced that the Big Bang was the result of an alien civilization trying to achieve faster-than-light travel, or complete an immensely large (solar system size or greater) particle accelerator experiement.

/I'm sure all of the particle physicists on Fark have a better explanation
 
2018-12-13 10:27:05 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

SciFi inner me:  You're prepping for time travel
 
2018-12-13 10:33:20 AM  

Nurglitch: What if I counter-balanced my mass with a black hole?


Your ass has a black hole.
 
2018-12-13 10:37:55 AM  

Linux_Yes: but mankind has decided that nothing can go faster than light.


Its not only safe, its the law!
 
2018-12-13 10:37:56 AM  
Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?
 
2018-12-13 10:41:58 AM  

foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.


Came here for this. We just can't control the speed or direction. Well, we can change how we experience the speed of time with drugs or sleep.
 
2018-12-13 10:42:06 AM  
Meet a boy named Phil
And his family
On a long vacation
Through history
Got a rented time machine
And they're on their way
To a time way way way back in the day

Now he's Phil Phil Phil of the future
Always ending up just before he began
He's Phil Phil Phil of the future
He's a 22nd century man
 
2018-12-13 10:43:10 AM  

MrBallou: sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.

So if one impossible thing happens, it makes other impossible things happen.

There's a life lesson in there somewhere, but I have no idea what it is.


"Alice laughed: "There's no use trying," she said; "one can't believe impossible things."
"I daresay you haven't had much practice," said the Queen. "When I was younger, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast."
Alice in Wonderland.
 
2018-12-13 10:44:08 AM  

Linux_Yes: foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.

im currently now in your future then.


Linux_Yes and foo monkey sitting in a tree. K I S S I N G ....
 
2018-12-13 10:44:13 AM  

grinding_journalist: sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.

Since about 5th grade when I learned about relativity explained in simple terms, I became comvinced that the Big Bang was the result of an alien civilization trying to achieve faster-than-light travel, or complete an immensely large (solar system size or greater) particle accelerator experiement.

/I'm sure all of the particle physicists on Fark have a better explanation


The big bang may have been the result of a black hole forming in another/parallel universe. This universe we're currently in might actually be inside a black hole. That's actually a theory some theoretical physicists are considering.
 
2018-12-13 10:45:19 AM  

Jake Havechek: Nurglitch: What if I counter-balanced my mass with a black hole?

Your ass has a black hole.


The answer is always butt stuff.
 
2018-12-13 10:47:00 AM  

mongbiohazard: grinding_journalist: sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.

Since about 5th grade when I learned about relativity explained in simple terms, I became comvinced that the Big Bang was the result of an alien civilization trying to achieve faster-than-light travel, or complete an immensely large (solar system size or greater) particle accelerator experiement.

/I'm sure all of the particle physicists on Fark have a better explanation

The big bang may have been the result of a black hole forming in another/parallel universe. This universe we're currently in might actually be inside a black hole. That's actually a theory some theoretical physicists are considering.


So we are all existing in subby's mom's anus?
 
2018-12-13 10:47:21 AM  

Who Flipped The Crazy Switch On The Matrix: Jake Havechek: Nurglitch: What if I counter-balanced my mass with a black hole?

Your ass has a black hole.

The answer is always butt stuff.


Always have plenty of water based lube, available.  That goes for any time era.
 
2018-12-13 10:51:50 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?


Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.
 
2018-12-13 10:58:57 AM  

Jake Havechek: Who Flipped The Crazy Switch On The Matrix: Jake Havechek: Nurglitch: What if I counter-balanced my mass with a black hole?

Your ass has a black hole.

The answer is always butt stuff.

Always have plenty of water based lube, available.  That goes for any time era.


If it's black, you should probably go to a doctor because there's a good chance you've got internal bleeding.
 
2018-12-13 11:10:01 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?


With the help of a singularity AI? Probably
 
2018-12-13 11:12:54 AM  

mongbiohazard: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.


If thats the case we need another solution to spread to the galaxy. Eternal life through genetics and/or robot... or staying in the solar system but sending all of humanity in a simulation of the universe where we can go faster than light
 
2018-12-13 11:14:59 AM  
"time travelling into the future" in most peoples minds doesn't mean exploiting relativistic effects to wait a relative (to you) short period of time near a massive object while long periods (to everyone else) of time pass to everyone not near that object.
It means having some effect that lets you skip time.  eg ZERO time passes for you, while some period of time passes for other people.

Rediscovering time dilation every year or so doesn't equal "time travel"

Besides the fact that anywhere near that kind of massive object the gravity gradients would fark you over if you were any thicker than a perfectly positioned sheet of paper.
 
2018-12-13 11:17:29 AM  

lolmao500: mongbiohazard: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.

If thats the case we need another solution to spread to the galaxy. Eternal life through genetics and/or robot... or staying in the solar system but sending all of humanity in a simulation of the universe where we can go faster than light


There's really no good reason our lifespans must forever be limited to what they currently are. That's essentially a nanotech engineering problem.

Of course... there are implications for that as well... For one thing, our brains aren't really going to hold 5,000 years worth of memories. You're going to forget what you were like previously as the centuries go by. But that's not necessarily a bad thing. But... that also has implications of its own.
 
2018-12-13 11:19:10 AM  

mongbiohazard: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.


I tend to think that "impractical" is a gross understatement. I'm all for doing research and pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge - my issue is that most ideas for FTL travel/time travel require the existence of substances or forms of energy that are currently purely hypothetical. If your idea for a flying car requires some form of exotic matter with negative mass - and there's no evidence that such a thing exists or could exist - it's grossly irresponsible to just assume that its non-existence it a problem that we'll figure out eventually.

As much as I like science fiction, it's kind of created this idea that hyperdrive and time travel are engineering problems that someone will figure out eventually, not ideas that rely on current physics being wrong.

(One problem that I tend to have is that any form of faster than light travel or communication would make it possible to send information into the past. This includes worm holes, warp drives, etc. Why that does not conclusively prove it's impossible, I'm generally okay with interpreting paradoxes as shorthand for "you can't do that.")
 
2018-12-13 11:21:52 AM  

foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.

sithon: An object increases in mass as it approaches the speed of light. So we just have to go the speed of light. Easy peasy.

oopsboom: Rediscovering time dilation every year or so doesn't equal "time travel"


I'd criticize you all for not reading the article, which is about time travel into the past, not the future, except that it's a terrible article. The author spends more time bragging about his own education than explaining his student's(!) paper.
 
2018-12-13 11:26:05 AM  

lolmao500: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

With the help of a singularity AI? Probably


If something is actually impossible, then a superintelligent AI isn't going to make it possible. I'm still just questioning whether or not negative energy can actually exist.
 
2018-12-13 11:34:15 AM  
I'm on open minded skeptic on most things...but time travel just isn't one of them.
It strikes me as a "religious" concept coated in theoretical masturbation to give false hope.

You get one shot. One chance. There is no going forward, there is no going back.
Physics doesn't give a sh*t about your hopes and dreams.
/wet blanket
 
2018-12-13 11:35:30 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: lolmao500: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

With the help of a singularity AI? Probably

If something is actually impossible, then a superintelligent AI isn't going to make it possible. I'm still just questioning whether or not negative energy can actually exist.


If something is actually impossible yes. But maybe we can create a parallel dimension where its possible? If not we can definitely build a simulated universe just like our own with a few changes, upload everyone in there and make impossible things, possible. When you come down to it, the universe is just a bunch of pixels... quark-sized pixels but still.
 
2018-12-13 11:53:28 AM  

Martian_Astronomer: mongbiohazard: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.

I tend to think that "impractical" is a gross understatement. I'm all for doing research and pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge - my issue is that most ideas for FTL travel/time travel require the existence of substances or forms of energy that are currently purely hypothetical. If your idea for a flying car requires some form of exotic matter with negative mass - and there's no evidence that such a thing exists or could exist - it's grossly irresponsible to just assume that its non-existence it a problem that we'll figure out eventually.

As much as I like science fiction, it's kind of created this idea that hyperdrive and time travel are engineering problems that someone will figure out eventually, not ideas that rely on current physics being wrong.

(One problem that I tend to have is that any form of faster than light travel or communication would make it possible to send information into the past. This includes worm holes, warp drives, etc. Why that does not conclusively prove it's impossible, I'm generally okay with interpreting paradoxes as shorthand for "you can't do that.")


Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high
 
2018-12-13 11:54:01 AM  

foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.


That explains why I want to fly like an eagle
 
2018-12-13 12:09:02 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Martian_Astronomer: mongbiohazard: Martian_Astronomer: Ah yes, you can travel back in time if can get your hands on a singularity without an event horizon. You can create a wormhole or Alcubierre drive if you can get your hands on an ass-ton of negative energy. You can create a powerful reactionless drive if you're able to displace an object's gravitational center of mass from its inertial center of mass.

All of these things are certainly possible because we can imagine them, right?

Yeah, until we discover some really new physics it is very likely FTL travel will always be impractical. The amount of energy required is calculable - and staggering. If we have to burn the mass of a Jupiter sized planet directly into energy just to take one trip then we're stuck travelling below the universe's speed limit.

I tend to think that "impractical" is a gross understatement. I'm all for doing research and pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge - my issue is that most ideas for FTL travel/time travel require the existence of substances or forms of energy that are currently purely hypothetical. If your idea for a flying car requires some form of exotic matter with negative mass - and there's no evidence that such a thing exists or could exist - it's grossly irresponsible to just assume that its non-existence it a problem that we'll figure out eventually.

As much as I like science fiction, it's kind of created this idea that hyperdrive and time travel are engineering problems that someone will figure out eventually, not ideas that rely on current physics being wrong.

(One problem that I tend to have is that any form of faster than light travel or communication would make it possible to send information into the past. This includes worm holes, warp drives, etc. Why that does not conclusively prove it's impossible, I'm generally okay with interpreting paradoxes as shorthand for "you can't do that.")

Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high


You're in the present in both locations when you're in them. Everything is relative to local conditions, there's not one single "true" time. It's just a matter of how much time has passed when you returned.

If you go somewhere that time passes slower in, then when you return more time will have passed in the place you left than what you experienced personally in the place where time passed slower.
 
2018-12-13 12:14:13 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high


Also, wouldn't both teleportation AND time-travel have to factor in precise spacetime coordinates? When you travel like that, you're effectively separated from the Earth and its rotation/orbit. So you'd have to know where the Earth is in space - knowing that the sun isn't stationary, for example (as it appears in many models), and itself moves through space in orbit around the Milky Way's galactic center.

It's not impossible to predict (though it is probably exponentially harder to predict with enough precision to get within, say, 100 miles of where you left), but I haven't seen anyone factor it into the discussion.
 
2018-12-13 12:20:59 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Mr Tarantula: Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high

Also, wouldn't both teleportation AND time-travel have to factor in precise spacetime coordinates? When you travel like that, you're effectively separated from the Earth and its rotation/orbit. So you'd have to know where the Earth is in space - knowing that the sun isn't stationary, for example (as it appears in many models), and itself moves through space in orbit around the Milky Way's galactic center.

It's not impossible to predict (though it is probably exponentially harder to predict with enough precision to get within, say, 100 miles of where you left), but I haven't seen anyone factor it into the discussion.


That's why I included the parenthesised section. Assume that part is figured out. Like we can target a specific rock, any time/place where that rock is/was.

The relativity thing makes sense. I assumed there was a constant flow of time, instead of everything being relative to everything else, even on a massive scale. It hurts to think about and causes a bit of existential dread.
 
2018-12-13 12:28:20 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high


Well, if you read the "Tachyonic Antitelephone" article, the math actually works the same if you're magically teleporting something faster than light as opposed to just sending information. The issue is superluminal interaction between any points with two inertial frames of reference.

Kip Thorne proposed a similar thought experiment to explain how wormholes could theoretically be used for time travel. It gets messy.
 
2018-12-13 12:33:22 PM  

Mr Tarantula: Dr Dreidel: Mr Tarantula: Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high

Also, wouldn't both teleportation AND time-travel have to factor in precise spacetime coordinates? When you travel like that, you're effectively separated from the Earth and its rotation/orbit. So you'd have to know where the Earth is in space - knowing that the sun isn't stationary, for example (as it appears in many models), and itself moves through space in orbit around the Milky Way's galactic center.

It's not impossible to predict (though it is probably exponentially harder to predict with enough precision to get within, say, 100 miles of where you left), but I haven't seen anyone factor it into the discussion.

That's why I included the parenthesised section. Assume that part is figured out. Like we can target a specific rock, any time/place where that rock is/was.

The relativity thing makes sense. I assumed there was a constant flow of time, instead of everything being relative to everything else, even on a massive scale. It hurts to think about and causes a bit of existential dread.


Yeah, things being relative was the big breakthrough of Einstein's General Relativity. The local strength of gravity affects the passage of time, speed relative to the speed of light. The more gravity, the slower time passes. The closer you are to moving at the speed of light, the slower time passes. And it's all relative to the local conditions of any given place. This has been conclusively proven to be true by experiments, and in fact we have to account for it or otherwise some technologies like GPS simply wouldn't work. The universe is a patchwork quilt of time moving faster and slower.

Fly in a spaceship away from earth at just 1/5 the speed of light for a year, and return and many years will have passed while you were travelling. Your local frame of reference in the spaceship had time moving slower.

For something that really blows my mind... a photon is a massless particle, and they only travel at the speed of light. When one is emitted by a distant star towards us it goes from 0 to lightspeed instantly. The mind blowing part is that since it travels at light speed it doesn't experience the passage of time. From the photon's point of view it gets emitted by a star a billion light years away at the same instant it hits the detector here on Earth, a billion years later. Weird, huh?
 
2018-12-13 12:40:00 PM  

mongbiohazard: Mr Tarantula: Dr Dreidel: Mr Tarantula: Reading this led me to a random idea:

Assume point-to-point teleportation exists. Teleport from Earth to a place that experiences much more time dilation. Effectively you'd be in the past. Now teleport back to Earth (ignoring how you'd find the right location). Would you be in the past or present?

/No, I'm not high

Also, wouldn't both teleportation AND time-travel have to factor in precise spacetime coordinates? When you travel like that, you're effectively separated from the Earth and its rotation/orbit. So you'd have to know where the Earth is in space - knowing that the sun isn't stationary, for example (as it appears in many models), and itself moves through space in orbit around the Milky Way's galactic center.

It's not impossible to predict (though it is probably exponentially harder to predict with enough precision to get within, say, 100 miles of where you left), but I haven't seen anyone factor it into the discussion.

That's why I included the parenthesised section. Assume that part is figured out. Like we can target a specific rock, any time/place where that rock is/was.

The relativity thing makes sense. I assumed there was a constant flow of time, instead of everything being relative to everything else, even on a massive scale. It hurts to think about and causes a bit of existential dread.

Yeah, things being relative was the big breakthrough of Einstein's General Relativity. The local strength of gravity affects the passage of time, speed relative to the speed of light. The more gravity, the slower time passes. The closer you are to moving at the speed of light, the slower time passes. And it's all relative to the local conditions of any given place. This has been conclusively proven to be true by experiments, and in fact we have to account for it or otherwise some technologies like GPS simply wouldn't work. The universe is a patchwork quilt of time moving faster and slower.

Fly in a spaceship away from earth at just 1/5 the speed of light for a year, and return and many years will have passed while you were travelling. Your local frame of reference in the spaceship had time moving slower.

For something that really blows my mind... a photon is a massless particle, and they only travel at the speed of light. When one is emitted by a distant star towards us it goes from 0 to lightspeed instantly. The mind blowing part is that since it travels at light speed it doesn't experience the passage of time. From the photon's point of view it gets emitted by a star a billion light years away at the same instant it hits the detector here on Earth, a billion years later. Weird, huh?


I can't even begin to understand how that is even possible, or the implications, or how to apply that knowledge. But it's a neat thing to know!
 
2018-12-13 01:53:01 PM  

whither_apophis: foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.

That explains why I want to fly like an eagle


Keeps on slippin' slippin' slippin'

/I see what you did there
//now I have it stuck in my head
///into the future
 
2018-12-13 02:06:41 PM  
*bzzt* I'm sorry that's not the right answer. The right answer is *redacted* from *redacted*
 
2018-12-13 02:07:16 PM  

UberDave: foo monkey: Time travel is real. We're all doing it right now.

No were not....relatively speaking.


This guy gets it.
 
2018-12-13 03:58:37 PM  
This explains the politics tab
 
Displayed 50 of 51 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report