Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Register)   Florida man has an iPhone it seems   ( theregister.co.uk) divider line
    More: Florida, foregone conclusion, United States, Supreme Court of the United States, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, foregone conclusion doctrine, Kelo v. City of New London, Bolling v. Sharpe, passcode  
•       •       •

5548 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Oct 2018 at 4:18 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-10-27 02:11:46 AM  
The defendant, a minor referred to as G.A.Q.L in his petition against the State of Florida

Sounds like a future Bond villain in training.
 
2018-10-27 02:15:39 AM  
I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?
 
2018-10-27 02:15:59 AM  
I bet ya hes got some child porn on it
 
2018-10-27 02:18:35 AM  

pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?


If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?
 
2018-10-27 02:27:32 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


/gee it's just been so long now since you took my phone away I don't remember the password anymore, sorry
 
2018-10-27 02:44:07 AM  

cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?

If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?


Because what they want is encryption with a back door just for the "good guys", but that's not how that stuff works at all.

Others will find it and put millions of others at risk.

I'm not defending that piece of sh*t, but anytime some terrorist asshole turns out to be an iPhone user, the topic of encryption comes up again, and we have relitigate the topic.
 
2018-10-27 03:27:32 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Try 00000.
 
2018-10-27 04:28:38 AM  
I was hoping the Florida man in question was Deadbeat Donnie.
 
2018-10-27 04:28:50 AM  

cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?

If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?


Should the government have a key to every safe?
 
2018-10-27 04:34:37 AM  

cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?

If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?

Can't any more.
https://www.fark.com/comments/1020576​3​/Apple-Thats-a-nice-phone-hacking-tool​-youve-got-there-Officers-It-would-be-​a-shame-if-something-happened-to-it
 
2018-10-27 04:45:04 AM  

MattytheMouse: [img.fark.net image 280x180]
Try 00000.


iPhones go to 11 6.
 
2018-10-27 04:48:20 AM  

bazbt3: MattytheMouse: [img.fark.net image 280x180]
Try 00000.

iPhones go to 11 6.


This is an iPhone we're talking about, not an ICBM.
 
2018-10-27 04:56:12 AM  
nowhere in this story is a fairy with a magic wand...
 
2018-10-27 05:01:08 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-10-27 05:03:11 AM  

fredbox: bazbt3: MattytheMouse: [img.fark.net image 280x180]
Try 00000.

iPhones go to 11 6.

This is an iPhone we're talking about, not an ICBM.


Or electronic payslips. My company started using the company referred to here earlier this year: http://jeremy.zawodny.com/blog/​archive​s/006309.html

That restrictions after creation of the first login are similar even now.
 
2018-10-27 05:23:13 AM  

cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?

If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?


There's a difference between opening your safe and forcing you to decode your diary.
 
2018-10-27 05:23:26 AM  

dailygrinds: The defendant, a minor referred to as G.A.Q.L in his petition against the State of Florida


They're trying to get the passcode to Ziggy out of Guide Al from Quantum Leap?

Oh boy.
 
2018-10-27 06:16:13 AM  
What's he like?
 
2018-10-27 09:16:33 AM  

propasaurus: cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.
What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?
If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it
If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?

Should the government have a key to every safe?


i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-10-27 09:23:44 AM  
We haven't been secure in our persons, houses, papers, and effects for decades.
 
2018-10-27 10:38:50 AM  
Here is why I still use passcodes on my phone.

One day your prints will be on file, as your DNA. This hasnt happened yet.

However I am not convinced that I want the police to be able to casually search databases for your DNA or prints if you were never convicted of anything.

Case in point a story that happened around my place.

Little girl goes missing. Still is. The police has a lot of pressure to find the perp. Witnesses describe a red corvette around the time of the disappearance. This is a rare car, so they find one dude that has a red corvette in the same city that they think hes the perp.

Let that sink in. THEY HAVE NO OTHER PROOF HE'S THEIR GUY, but they put blinders on and get approved for a Mr Big operation. For 2 years they try to nail the guy, doesnt work. They put trackers on all of his computers, no proof he's even a pedo!

Then one of the trackers in the public computers in his office gets a hit. The computers are used by many employees. They lock up the guy, crucify him in the news. Guy goes to court.

Judges dismisses all charged with prejudice against the cops. Even goes as far as telling cops not to try anything like that again.

Now tell me, if there is a murder or anything like that happening where I work, or close to where I live and a witness describes someone who looks vaguely like me and it just happens there is one of my prints around or my DNA that the cops wouldnt put their blinders on and go after me?

Of course they would, because its their job to nail someone, not to find the culprits.

Dont use the fingerprint identification feature on your phones people, dont get your prints on databases early.
 
2018-10-27 12:52:23 PM  

cman: pxlboy: I see yet another trial balloon against device encryption. They were able to find him because of his sloppy work.

What the hell do they need from his iPhone that they can't get from his email, text, and phone records?

If this was a safe, you would have no problem with them using a locksmith to open it

If they use tools to unlock his phone and they have a warrant, would you have a problem with that?


No, but I would have a problem with the government requiring every safe to be built with a secret vulnerability that allows anyone who knows the secret to open it without the combination.

That's where they're trying to go with phones.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report