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(Esquire)   An original Salvador Dalí painting went unnoticed inside NYC's Rikers Island prison for forty years ... until a gang of thieves decided it might be worth something   ( esquire.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Corrections officer, Nuzzo, Prison, Theft, Sokol, Dal, Pina, Benny Nuzzo  
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5031 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2018 at 8:07 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-10-11 02:58:03 PM  
That's quite an interesting story.
 
2018-10-11 03:30:52 PM  
They never found it, huh? I wonder if it's still stashed in the prison somewhere.
 
2018-10-11 03:30:53 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-10-11 08:15:05 PM  
Coincidentally, if you look at that prison from the correct distance, it looks like the Lincoln Memorial.
 
2018-10-11 08:21:38 PM  
I bet it was some bikers.   I wouldn't recommend ratting on them though....
 
2018-10-11 08:27:09 PM  
Dali had a pet ocelot?
i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-10-11 08:27:43 PM  

Loan Starr: I bet it was some bikers.   I wouldn't recommend ratting on them though....


Those are people...
Who get that reference!
Who get that reference!

They'll all my fellow farkers
And they get that reference.
 
2018-10-11 08:52:54 PM  
Thanks, Subby!

I learned something AND didn't have to think about politics for a few minutes.
 
2018-10-11 09:12:48 PM  

atomic-age: Thanks, Subby!

I learned something AND didn't have to think about politics for a few minutes.


Do you know who else was a painter?
 
2018-10-11 09:14:45 PM  
Modern art is just a form of dyslexia.
 
2018-10-11 09:15:08 PM  
And now authorities are going to turn that prison upside down to find it and put it in some dusty museum, because GOD FORBID prisoners ever have something nice.
 
2018-10-11 09:16:47 PM  

atomic-age: Thanks, Subby!

I learned something AND didn't have to think about politics for a few minutes.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-10-11 09:51:21 PM  
Seems over the top to steal it.  Have two guys walk in wearing suits.  They point to the painting, make notes, point some more.  Walk out.  A few days later, forge a work order to have the painting relocated to Prison HQ.  Later, two moving guys come in, take the painting out the front door.  Gone.

Anyone asks "Geez, there were suits in here pointin' at it and gawking fer an hour"
Anyone asks:  "Here's a copy of the work order.  Looks like very other work order."
Anyone asks:  Last I saw it, it was getting in the prison truck with the prison movers.
 
2018-10-11 09:58:28 PM  
Is it just me or did that article end rather suddenly?
 
2018-10-11 10:09:19 PM  

Chevello: Is it just me or did that article end rather suddenly?


I though so too.
 
2018-10-11 10:55:25 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: Seems over the top to steal it.  Have two guys walk in wearing suits.  They point to the painting, make notes, point some more.  Walk out.  A few days later, forge a work order to have the painting relocated to Prison HQ.  Later, two moving guys come in, take the painting out the front door.  Gone.

Anyone asks "Geez, there were suits in here pointin' at it and gawking fer an hour"
Anyone asks:  "Here's a copy of the work order.  Looks like very other work order."
Anyone asks:  Last I saw it, it was getting in the prison truck with the prison movers.


The Mona Lisa was once stolen from the Louvre in a similar fashion, and that's nowhere near the most interesting part of that story.

But what I want to know is the most fascinating part of this story, which isn't mentioned at all. What heinous crime did the painting commit that got it thrown into Riker's in the first place? I'd think a flagrant disregard for geospatial relationships is a misdemeanor at most.
 
2018-10-11 11:13:11 PM  
No pic of forgery in TFA, but the quality of the replacement sounds comical. People might not have noticed the wrong squiggly lines and splotches for a while, but stapling something up with a fake, painted-on frame was a farking ridiculous plan.
 
2018-10-12 06:45:02 AM  

EdgeRunner: But what I want to know is the most fascinating part of this story, which isn't mentioned at all. What heinous crime did the painting commit that got it thrown into Riker's in the first place? I'd think a flagrant disregard for geospatial relationships is a misdemeanor at most.


So this information is actually buried deep in the opening paragraphs.
 
2018-10-12 06:46:15 AM  

dammit just give me a login: No pic of forgery in TFA, but the quality of the replacement sounds comical. People might not have noticed the wrong squiggly lines and splotches for a while, but stapling something up with a fake, painted-on frame was a farking ridiculous plan.


My greatest regret, in that very interesting tale, was that they neglected to show a photo of the fake.
 
2018-10-12 07:26:44 AM  

proteus_b: EdgeRunner: But what I want to know is the most fascinating part of this story, which isn't mentioned at all. What heinous crime did the painting commit that got it thrown into Riker's in the first place? I'd think a flagrant disregard for geospatial relationships is a misdemeanor at most.

So this information is actually buried deep in the opening paragraphs.


Oh I saw their official explanation. Not buying it. If this was just a Thomas Kincade or a Robert Rauschenberg, there'd be no hesitation to list the offense in the article, but because it's a Dali the art snobs are covering for it.
 
2018-10-12 11:43:51 AM  

Bluemoons: Chevello: Is it just me or did that article end rather suddenly?

I though so too.


The ending was taken to a relative's attic and destroyed. We only get to see a fake, poorly made ending.
 
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