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(USA Today)   Why fewer NFL players have been arrested since 2014. Numbers even dropped for Bengals   ( usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Crime, NFL player arrests, Criminal law, Domestic violence, Driving under the influence, Violence, Drunk driving in the United States, Punishment  
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805 clicks; posted to Sports » on 11 Oct 2018 at 10:05 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-10-11 09:58:34 AM  
They take a knee.
 
2018-10-11 10:14:14 AM  
When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.
 
2018-10-11 10:16:30 AM  

SkylineRecords: This sign should be in every locker room BAR in America

1. Drink like a champion today
2. Leave your guns at home
3. Call a taxi


Fixed for your average NFL fan.
 
2018-10-11 10:23:16 AM  
Bribery?
 
2018-10-11 10:30:42 AM  

006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.


And that's without getting into the head injury side that is going to result in decreased inhibitory control, higher risk taking, and aggression responses.
 
2018-10-11 10:33:28 AM  
They finally took Chris Carter's advice?

Cris Carter - 'Fall Guy in Your Crew' Advice, Then Apology
Youtube C4kQ3Tx52tE
 
2018-10-11 10:35:02 AM  

006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.


This. I am NEVER surprised when a big name athlete commits violent crime. They're heaped with fame, riches, and opportunity while being trained, albeit in different areas of life, to confront problems with direct force. What's more, a lot of them know they'll be let off so long as things don't go public. End result is people who take what they want and hurt people around them with relative impunity.
 
2018-10-11 10:42:17 AM  
The league still considers one arrest to be too many, even if that might not be realistic.

It's unrealistic to expect them not to break the law? I've managed almost 50 years on this planet without ever being arrested. It's really not that difficult.
 
2018-10-11 10:49:32 AM  

abhorrent1: The league still considers one arrest to be too many, even if that might not be realistic.

It's unrealistic to expect them not to break the law? I've managed almost 50 years on this planet without ever being arrested. It's really not that difficult.


I notice you said "ever being arrested" and not "committing a crime", because you have already admitted your guilt, citizen.

Please report to Room 208A for your mandatory lobotomy.  Please do not enter 208B, they are using the robotic caterpillars to consume the insides of a man who committed a misdemeanor.

Until then, please note that any further moralistic hand-wringing on how you are "good people" will only add to the length of your sentence.
 
2018-10-11 10:56:23 AM  

TheManofPA: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

And that's without getting into the head injury side that is going to result in decreased inhibitory control, higher risk taking, and aggression responses.


You have to understand that this line of thinking would require me to take some level of moral responsibility for supporting the sports leagues that cause the brain injuries, and let's be clear, I don't have the time to do that, I'm a single mother who works three full-time jobs in order to support her fourteen kids.

It's easier to blame the bad apples who murdered their family and loved ones because the voices in their head told them to do it.  Isolated incident, nothing to see here, go sportsball team.
 
2018-10-11 11:01:50 AM  
Last year, the players union announced a partnership with Lyft in which active players would be eligible to receive $250 in ride credits.

The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?

32 teams * 32 players per team = 1,696 total players
1696 * 250 = $424,000 for Lyft/Uber to subsidize NFL players (most of whom make well above the league minimum)

All because the players are too dumb to know not to drive drunk?

// there's probably also promotional considerations involved
// but that still seems like a GIANT waste of money on people who already have plenty of it (people who already had plenty of motivation to use rideshares in the first place)
// I bet the drivers need that $250 more than a half-millionaire ballplayer does
 
2018-10-11 11:09:01 AM  

Dr Dreidel: 32 teams * 53 players per team = 1,696 total players


Is it lunchtime yet?
 
2018-10-11 11:12:24 AM  
Legal marijuana?
 
2018-10-11 11:21:10 AM  

Dr Dreidel: The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?


Practice squad players only make $7500 a week. Think of the practice squad players!
 
2018-10-11 11:45:50 AM  

Dr Dreidel: Last year, the players union announced a partnership with Lyft in which active players would be eligible to receive $250 in ride credits.

The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?

32 teams * 32 players per team = 1,696 total players
1696 * 250 = $424,000 for Lyft/Uber to subsidize NFL players (most of whom make well above the league minimum)

All because the players are too dumb to know not to drive drunk?

// there's probably also promotional considerations involved
// but that still seems like a GIANT waste of money on people who already have plenty of it (people who already had plenty of motivation to use rideshares in the first place)
// I bet the drivers need that $250 more than a half-millionaire ballplayer does


Depends on how it's set up. The league and/or the players' union is likely picking up the tab, so the drivers are still getting paid. I'm not sure what the "eligible to receive" part means; seems like it's easer to offer it to everyone and be done with it. If there's some sort of application process they're probably spending more money in staff time than they would to just automatically dole out the credits.

And I agree that it seems silly to subsidize that for people who probably spent ten times that much just before needing said ride, it gets them and their entourage away from the wheel which benefits everyone. It takes cost, and the final excuse, out of the equation. On the flip side, since they took the final excuse away the consequences for violation should increase exponentially.
 
2018-10-11 11:47:52 AM  

abhorrent1: Dr Dreidel: The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?

Practice squad players only make $7500 a week. Think of the practice squad players!


They could perp walk practice squad players all day and it wouldn't effect NFL revenues.  I think the big takeaway is that there can be a major (at least in the news) protest by NFL players against cops without there being much of a pushback.  Considering how "above the law" NCAA football players are (at least in programs tucked away in small towns), I'm surprised that players can make the transition from when they could get away with their "do you know who I am" glory days.

TheManofPA: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

And that's without getting into the head injury side that is going to result in decreased inhibitory control, higher risk taking, and aggression responses.


I have to wonder if QB protection has added an extra layer of practicing "kill/don't kill" on the field, thus making them think (if only once) before full attack mode.  I doubt any PR-based NFL programs would possibly have as much effect as changing the game.
 
2018-10-11 11:52:03 AM  

006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.


Exactly. When you're told your whole life (or a good part of it) that your shiat don't stink and the people around you constantly make excuses for your bad behavior, that becomes your reality (ditto for numerous child stars, politicians, etc.). Plus you have the "some wanna-be badass always trying to fark with you" factor.
 
2018-10-11 12:02:20 PM  
....and as this article came out, many players will get arrested soon after. Just watch.
 
2018-10-11 12:04:59 PM  
Teams started to send a photo array of their final roster to the local prescient for away games.
 
2018-10-11 12:07:51 PM  

flynn80: Teams started to send a photo array of their final roster to the local prescient for away games.


regmedia.co.ukView Full Size
 
2018-10-11 12:43:43 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Last year, the players union announced a partnership with Lyft in which active players would be eligible to receive $250 in ride credits.

The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?

32 teams * 32 players per team = 1,696 total players
1696 * 250 = $424,000 for Lyft/Uber to subsidize NFL players (most of whom make well above the league minimum)

All because the players are too dumb to know not to drive drunk?

// there's probably also promotional considerations involved
// but that still seems like a GIANT waste of money on people who already have plenty of it (people who already had plenty of motivation to use rideshares in the first place)
// I bet the drivers need that $250 more than a half-millionaire ballplayer does


I thought there were 54 players on a roster.
 
2018-10-11 12:46:14 PM  

BretMavrik: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

Exactly. When you're told your whole life (or a good part of it) that your shiat don't stink and the people around you constantly make excuses for your bad behavior, that becomes your reality (ditto for numerous child stars, politicians, etc.). Plus you have the "some wanna-be badass always trying to fark with you" factor.


So, for fun, let's look at these numbers and compare them to the rest of society at large.

There are 53 active roster members, generally about 5-6 IR'd per team (that don't count toward the 53), and 10 practice squad members per team. This equates to 69 players per team, or 2,208 players league wide.

For the full year 2017 there were 42 arrests, which equates to a population arrest rate of 1.91%. If I look at 2017 numbers by state, the ones in the middle are around 3700 per 100,000 in population, or a 3.7% arrest rate. NFL arrest rates are actually pretty close to MA as a total state, which had the lowest per 100,000 arrest rate in 2017 at about 1.8%.

So, on the basis of arrests alone, NFL players are actually doing better than the general population.

I'm sure if we were to narrow this down to look at arrest rates to a nationwide comparable demographic (young men in their 20's and 30's with a high percentage of black men) they would fall well below the national average.

But yes, let's say that the players overwhelmingly are held to a lower standard of conduct based on their sense of entitlement.
 
rka
2018-10-11 12:49:45 PM  

abhorrent1: The league still considers one arrest to be too many, even if that might not be realistic.

It's unrealistic to expect them not to break the law? I've managed almost 50 years on this planet without ever being arrested. It's really not that difficult.


Put 54 of your friends in a room and see if you can say the same thing about them. Go ahead, do a survey.
 
2018-10-11 12:58:14 PM  

Crewmannumber6: They finally took Chris Carter's advice?

[Youtube C4kQ3Tx52tE image 480x270][Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/C4kQ3Tx5​2tE]


C'mon Cris Carter, you're going to say all that on camera? Got to be smarter than that now.
 
2018-10-11 01:03:00 PM  

abhorrent1: The league still considers one arrest to be too many, even if that might not be realistic.

It's unrealistic to expect them not to break the law? I've managed almost 50 years on this planet without ever being arrested. It's really not that difficult.


Difficulty: Attractive and Successful in Darkest Timeline.
 
2018-10-11 02:06:06 PM  

TotallyHeadless: C'mon Cris Carter, you're going to say all that on camera? Got to be smarter than that now.


I think Stringer would have some opinions about that.
 
2018-10-11 02:33:07 PM  

Dr Dreidel: Last year, the players union announced a partnership with Lyft in which active players would be eligible to receive $250 in ride credits.

The NFL's minimum salary is $480,000 - that's over SEVEN TIMES the US median wage. What the hell do they need a $250 credit for?

32 teams * 32 players per team = 1,696 total players
1696 * 250 = $424,000 for Lyft/Uber to subsidize NFL players (most of whom make well above the league minimum)

All because the players are too dumb to know not to drive drunk?

// there's probably also promotional considerations involved
// but that still seems like a GIANT waste of money on people who already have plenty of it (people who already had plenty of motivation to use rideshares in the first place)
// I bet the drivers need that $250 more than a half-millionaire ballplayer does


I think it is to remove any possible excuse on the drunk players' part.
 
2018-10-11 02:42:56 PM  

mattgsx: BretMavrik: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

Exactly. When you're told your whole life (or a good part of it) that your shiat don't stink and the people around you constantly make excuses for your bad behavior, that becomes your reality (ditto for numerous child stars, politicians, etc.). Plus you have the "some wanna-be badass always trying to fark with you" factor.

So, for fun, let's look at these numbers and compare them to the rest of society at large.

There are 53 active roster members, generally about 5-6 IR'd per team (that don't count toward the 53), and 10 practice squad members per team. This equates to 69 players per team, or 2,208 players league wide.

For the full year 2017 there were 42 arrests, which equates to a population arrest rate of 1.91%. If I look at 2017 numbers by state, the ones in the middle are around 3700 per 100,000 in population, or a 3.7% arrest rate. NFL arrest rates are actually pretty close to MA as a total state, which had the lowest per 100,000 arrest rate in 2017 at about 1.8%.

So, on the basis of arrests alone, NFL players are actually doing better than the general population.

I'm sure if we were to narrow this down to look at arrest rates to a nationwide comparable demographic (young men in their 20's and 30's with a high percentage of black men) they would fall well below the national average.

But yes, let's say that the players overwhelmingly are held to a lower standard of conduct based on their sense of entitlement.


If they are held to a lower standard, that would cause a relatively low arrest rate. I am sure that they can get away with a lot that random people couldn't. Both due to society letting things slide as well as using their wealth to keep them out of riskier situations (for example, a multi-millionaire buying some coke is probably able to use less risky channels than a random person).

But for most, they also know that even a minor run in with the law could end the gravy train. The average NFL player is not too hard to replace if they turn into bad PR. Losing your million dollar payday that your worked your whole life for is probably a lot more concerning than losing a minimum wage job.

And the stars know that bad PR jeopardize their endorsement deals. Plus I am sure the teams apply a lot of pressure on that idea too.
 
2018-10-11 02:49:59 PM  

PghThermal: I think it is to remove any possible excuse on the drunk players' part.


What, the Players' Union telling them that it's 2-game suspension (for the FIRST infraction, per TFA) isn't enough?

At league minimum, a single game check (which you forfeit when you get suspended) is 480,000/16 = $30,000. So a $60,000 hit to the pocketbook isn't enough of a motivator, but a $250 credit is?

// why not just have NFL rideshare accounts players can use - I mean if the players had to do it themselves, they'd have to sign up for 2 (or more) services, link a credit card, make sure those payments are up to date, handle tipping, and they're on the hook for emailing support if anything goes wonky
// are these adult people, or are they gibbering morons who need to be reminded to exhale between inhales?
 
2018-10-11 04:05:31 PM  
Dr Dreidel:
// are these adult people, or are they gibbering morons who need to be reminded to exhale between inhales?

How much football have you been exposed to? It ain't everyone, but it's still a lot. What little capacity they have is entirely filled with Xs and Os.
 
2018-10-11 05:42:50 PM  

dywed88: mattgsx: BretMavrik: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

Exactly. When you're told your whole life (or a good part of it) that your shiat don't stink and the people around you constantly make excuses for your bad behavior, that becomes your reality (ditto for numerous child stars, politicians, etc.). Plus you have the "some wanna-be badass always trying to fark with you" factor.

So, for fun, let's look at these numbers and compare them to the rest of society at large.

There are 53 active roster members, generally about 5-6 IR'd per team (that don't count toward the 53), and 10 practice squad members per team. This equates to 69 players per team, or 2,208 players league wide.

For the full year 2017 there were 42 arrests, which equates to a population arrest rate of 1.91%. If I look at 2017 numbers by state, the ones in the middle are around 3700 per 100,000 in population, or a 3.7% arrest rate. NFL arrest rates are actually pretty close to MA as a total state, which had the lowest per 100,000 arrest rate in 2017 at about 1.8%.

So, on the basis of arrests alone, NFL players are actually doing better than the general population.

I'm sure if we were to narrow this down to look at arrest rates to a nationwide comparable demographic (young men in their 20's and 30's with a high percentage of black men) they would fall well below the national average.

But yes, let's say that the players overwhelmingly are held to a lower standard of conduct based on their sense of entitlement.

If they are held to a lower standard, that would cause a relatively low arrest rate. I am sure that they can get ...


It's also worth noting that many NFL players give back to their community in different ways, whether that be non-profit foundations, fundraising for charities, children's hospital visits, etc.. No way to compare that to population studies but I think it's a safe bet that this happens at a higher rate among NFL players than the general population, AND at a higher rate than comparable earners of other professions. While some of that could be selfishly motivated (to drum up PR), it's also possible, just possible, that the vast majority of these extremely driven and very highly paid young men understand that society looks at them (rightly or wrongly) as role models, and so they hold themselves (rightly or wrongly) to a higher standard, and they want to use the platform they've been given to do good and be good.
 
2018-10-11 05:42:52 PM  

mattgsx: BretMavrik: 006andahalf: When a sport is intrinsically premised on virtually unrestrained aggression and risk acceptance, it is hardly a surprise that some of the most elite performers would have a hard time separating that aspect of their employment from real society.  This is especially true in America where you're lazy and unbootstrappy if you don't revolve your existence around your employment.  The bad comes with the good.

Exactly. When you're told your whole life (or a good part of it) that your shiat don't stink and the people around you constantly make excuses for your bad behavior, that becomes your reality (ditto for numerous child stars, politicians, etc.). Plus you have the "some wanna-be badass always trying to fark with you" factor.

So, for fun, let's look at these numbers and compare them to the rest of society at large.

There are 53 active roster members, generally about 5-6 IR'd per team (that don't count toward the 53), and 10 practice squad members per team. This equates to 69 players per team, or 2,208 players league wide.

For the full year 2017 there were 42 arrests, which equates to a population arrest rate of 1.91%. If I look at 2017 numbers by state, the ones in the middle are around 3700 per 100,000 in population, or a 3.7% arrest rate. NFL arrest rates are actually pretty close to MA as a total state, which had the lowest per 100,000 arrest rate in 2017 at about 1.8%.

So, on the basis of arrests alone, NFL players are actually doing better than the general population.

I'm sure if we were to narrow this down to look at arrest rates to a nationwide comparable demographic (young men in their 20's and 30's with a high percentage of black men) they would fall well below the national average.

But yes, let's say that the players overwhelmingly are held to a lower standard of conduct based on their sense of entitlement.


I tend to take the view that the lower rates relative to the population indicates that, despite aspersions contrary, that NFLers are swayed by their status to engage in fewer risky behaviors, which is all the more remarkable given the environmental factors under which they operate.
 
2018-10-11 08:05:15 PM  

nmrsnr: Bribery?


Yup, call my teams lawyer instead of my lawyer
 
2018-10-11 10:49:01 PM  
This explains the NFL's lower television ratings.  Who wants to watch a league with talent thinned out by only those who can stay out of jail.
 
2018-10-12 11:40:36 PM  

Greil: End result is people who take what they want and hurt people around them with relative impunity.


I think it's more accurate to say they're selected for being violent and heedless of consequences than that they are molded or choose to be so. If you want to be in the NFL, you have to both be the best of the best and be willing to destroy yourself in the pursuit. Which is correlated with making other poor decisions.
 
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