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(CNN)   Good: you receive a new heart. Bad: it gives you cancer. Worse: same donor's lungs, liver, and kidneys give others cancer, too   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Cure Science Scouted, World News Half, Sheet Politics Entertainment, News Tech Hunt, Kidney, Cancer, undetectable malignancy, Medicine  
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3489 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Sep 2018 at 5:05 PM (47 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-09-19 03:27:34 PM  
I am Jack's cancerous liver. I kill Jack.
 
2018-09-19 04:04:32 PM  
Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.
 
2018-09-19 05:08:04 PM  
My Grandfather smoked his whole life. I was about 10 years old when my mother said to him, 'If you ever want to see your grandchildren graduate, you have to stop immediately.' Tears welled up in his eyes when he realized what exactly was at stake. He gave it up immediately. Three years later he died of lung cancer. It was really sad and destroyed me. My mother said to me- 'Don't ever smoke. Please don't put your family through what your Grandfather put us through." I agreed. At 28, I have never touched a cigarette. I must say, I feel a very slight sense of regret for never having done it, because the stupidity and the massive bad lick of this situation gave me cancer anyway.
 
2018-09-19 05:08:28 PM  
Doctor: "I've got good news and bad news."
 
2018-09-19 05:08:38 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-09-19 05:08:49 PM  
Didn't something similar happen in Scrubs? It wasn't cancer though.
 
2018-09-19 05:09:11 PM  
This occasionally happens with HIV. The last case I remember was a hospital taking organs donated by a high-risk promiscuous gay man who had basically been infected about 15 minutes before dying, and then transplanting them to others without telling them where the organs came from. Whatever testing they did at the time wasn't sensitive enough to catch an HIV infection as such a low level.
 
2018-09-19 05:12:55 PM  
Came for Dr. Cox, left disappointed.
 
2018-09-19 05:12:59 PM  
This kind of thing happened to a guy I worked with.
He got kidney disease which was heading towards killing him.  His brother donated a kidney.  A year later, the donated kidney burst into cancer, and a year after that he was dead.  The kidney the brother kept was fine.
He was a lovely guy.
 
2018-09-19 05:14:32 PM  

hoodiowithtudio: Didn't something similar happen in Scrubs? It wasn't cancer though.


It was rabies. That was a good show until it wasn't.
 
2018-09-19 05:15:30 PM  
WTF, a person who has cancer in every organ of their body can have "essentially an undetectable malignancy at the time of donation" !?
 
2018-09-19 05:16:33 PM  
The initial problem wasn't really preventable.  The donor died of a stroke in 2007. Graham Lord, professor of medicine and honorary consultant in nephrology at King's College London, said the donor's cancer was "essentially an undetectable malignancy at the time of donation."

OTOH, the first confirmation of malignancy in a recipient was ~2009, but the abstract doesn't make it clear when and to what extent the other recipients were warned or treated.
 
2018-09-19 05:17:18 PM  
I saw this episode of House M.D.
 
2018-09-19 05:18:11 PM  

Mugato: Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.


When I deployed, the army doc asked if I wanted to be an organ donor. I said sure, why not. The  he asked me if there were any organs I *didn't* want to donate. I said "yeah, my right testicle." He stops writing, pauses for a moment, and then looks at me. "...what?" "Well you know how people always say 'I'd give my right nut for that'? Well, I'm keeping mine." He just stares for like 20 seconds and asks "are you serious?" "Yes sir. Absolutely." So somewhere in my official government file, it says they cannot take my right testicle.
 
2018-09-19 05:19:16 PM  
Beyond FARK: breast cancer
 
2018-09-19 05:19:29 PM  
I'm a Scorpio.
 
2018-09-19 05:23:05 PM  

Atomic Jonb: Came for Dr. Cox, left disappointed.


That's what she said?
 
2018-09-19 05:24:36 PM  
Question: is it better to die very soon as a result of organ failure, or several years from now due to cancer?

I could see arguments going either way.
 
2018-09-19 05:25:05 PM  

MythDragon: Mugato: Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.

When I deployed, the army doc asked if I wanted to be an organ donor. I said sure, why not. The  he asked me if there were any organs I *didn't* want to donate. I said "yeah, my right testicle." He stops writing, pauses for a moment, and then looks at me. "...what?" "Well you know how people always say 'I'd give my right nut for that'? Well, I'm keeping mine." He just stares for like 20 seconds and asks "are you serious?" "Yes sir. Absolutely." So somewhere in my official government file, it says they cannot take my right testicle.


I was just joking about my liver, I figured the doctor would determine which organs were viable and which weren't and wouldn't leave it up to me. I didn't know it worked like that. Is it a religious thing?
 
2018-09-19 05:25:06 PM  
The patients became ill years after their transplants.

So - the transplants achieved their intended results and the recipients got years that they otherwise would not have.  Mission accomplished.
 
2018-09-19 05:25:36 PM  
Patient a few years later:
media-amazon.comView Full Size

"You have something I need."
 
2018-09-19 05:26:13 PM  

SansNeural: WTF, a person who has cancer in every organ of their body can have "essentially an undetectable malignancy at the time of donation" !?


I think it depends on how it presents. Cancerous tumors are big obvious lumps, but if it metastasizes into something like bone marrow or blood stream it may become diffuse and harder to detect? I dunno.

Also TFA doesn't say, but I assume anyone who had cancer anywhere before is struck from donor lists... So this person had metastasized cancer so bad it was in several unrelated systems and there was no history of anything prior to that? Hmmmmm. That seems pretty rare, yeah...

Also-also, might rejection-suppression drugs allow cancer to grow? I know that there's a type of fertility treatment that is pretty much a green light for cancerous growths, so I'm gonna guess it's possible.
 
2018-09-19 05:26:24 PM  
When people asked me what would I do if I won the lottery. I would say be diagnosed with cancer the next day.
 
2018-09-19 05:29:45 PM  
Did it come with a free Frogurt?
 
2018-09-19 05:30:59 PM  

Mugato: MythDragon: Mugato: Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.

When I deployed, the army doc asked if I wanted to be an organ donor. I said sure, why not. The  he asked me if there were any organs I *didn't* want to donate. I said "yeah, my right testicle." He stops writing, pauses for a moment, and then looks at me. "...what?" "Well you know how people always say 'I'd give my right nut for that'? Well, I'm keeping mine." He just stares for like 20 seconds and asks "are you serious?" "Yes sir. Absolutely." So somewhere in my official government file, it says they cannot take my right testicle.

I was just joking about my liver, I figured the doctor would determine which organs were viable and which weren't and wouldn't leave it up to me.


I think this article pretty clearly shows that we should NOT trust the doctor in that regard.
 
2018-09-19 05:31:36 PM  
My zodiac sign is Cancer so I'm farked anyhow.  I smoked several cartons of Winstons today.
 
2018-09-19 05:31:37 PM  

Skail: Did it come with a free Frogurt?


I don't know.  Did the frog get cancer too?
 
2018-09-19 05:33:54 PM  

Dave2042: This kind of thing happened to a guy I worked with.
He got kidney disease which was heading towards killing him.  His brother donated a kidney.  A year later, the donated kidney burst into cancer, and a year after that he was dead.  The kidney the brother kept was fine.
He was a lovely guy.


The immunosuppressants that transplant patients have to take to prevent their body rejecting the donor organ will also make them more likely to develop cancer.  This is not because the immunosuppressants increase the likelihood of cells turning cancerous, but because drugs hinder the immune system's ability to locate and fight cancerous cells before they take over.
 
2018-09-19 05:34:12 PM  

Herb Utsmelz: My zodiac sign is Cancer so I'm farked anyhow.  I smoked several cartons of Winstons today.


You should be OK as long as you don't hang out in Mexico, northern Africa or southern Asia.  Tropic of Cancer.
 
2018-09-19 05:34:20 PM  

Dave2042: This kind of thing happened to a guy I worked with.
He got kidney disease which was heading towards killing him.  His brother donated a kidney.  A year later, the donated kidney burst into cancer, and a year after that he was dead.  The kidney the brother kept was fine.
He was a lovely guy.


My limited medical knowledge is that anti-rejection drugs have an effect of dampening the immune system to where cancer is a much higher risk for organ transplant recipients. It's entirely possible there was some tiny malignancy in the donated kidney that the healthy brother could have or might have shrugged off, but the anti-rejection medications for the recipient meant it was free to multiply without the immune function to strike it off.
 
2018-09-19 05:34:49 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-09-19 05:35:08 PM  

cefm: The patients became ill years after their transplants.

So - the transplants achieved their intended results and the recipients got years that they otherwise would not have.  Mission accomplished.


There are drugs to "cure" Hepatitis C now (undetectable viral load), but for the last couple of decades they have transplanted Hep C livers into Hep C recipients because it came down to that or death. As research progressed and they gained the ability to differentiate the types of the disease, they tried their best to match the type exactly.
 
2018-09-19 05:35:41 PM  
I used to donate blood but don't anymore since I am taking a lot of medications for my heart  I wonder how this all affects my organ donation when I die and how do they know
 
2018-09-19 05:36:05 PM  

extroverted_suicide: [img.fark.net image 425x318]


immediately what i thought of.
 
2018-09-19 05:36:12 PM  

SansNeural: I think this article pretty clearly shows that we should NOT trust the doctor in that regard.


Well yeah but I just meant in general.

uncleacid: When people asked me what would I do if I won the lottery. I would say be diagnosed with cancer the next day.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-09-19 05:36:59 PM  

SansNeural: Mugato: MythDragon: Mugato: Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.

When I deployed, the army doc asked if I wanted to be an organ donor. I said sure, why not. The  he asked me if there were any organs I *didn't* want to donate. I said "yeah, my right testicle." He stops writing, pauses for a moment, and then looks at me. "...what?" "Well you know how people always say 'I'd give my right nut for that'? Well, I'm keeping mine." He just stares for like 20 seconds and asks "are you serious?" "Yes sir. Absolutely." So somewhere in my official government file, it says they cannot take my right testicle.

I was just joking about my liver, I figured the doctor would determine which organs were viable and which weren't and wouldn't leave it up to me.

I think this article pretty clearly shows that we should NOT trust the doctor in that regard.


Sure.  I'm sure it's best to trust Donald Trump or Nancy Pelosi instead.   Or "Alex M. Azar" (bet you have to look that one up..)
 
2018-09-19 05:38:33 PM  

ChipNASA: My Grandfather smoked his whole life. I was about 10 years old when my mother said to him, 'If you ever want to see your grandchildren graduate, you have to stop immediately.' Tears welled up in his eyes when he realized what exactly was at stake. He gave it up immediately. Three years later he died of lung cancer. It was really sad and destroyed me. My mother said to me- 'Don't ever smoke. Please don't put your family through what your Grandfather put us through." I agreed. At 28, I have never touched a cigarette. I must say, I feel a very slight sense of regret for never having done it, because the stupidity and the massive bad lick of this situation gave me cancer anyway.


And the messed up part is that he could have kept smoking those 3 years and it wouldn't have affected how long he lived. So he went through quitting just to die from it anyway.
 
2018-09-19 05:39:09 PM  

darklingscribe: immunosuppressants


You said immunosuppressants twice. I think you like that word.
 
2018-09-19 05:39:17 PM  

Aidan: Also-also, might rejection-suppression drugs allow cancer to grow?


My mom had a hip replacement and a year later she was dead at 56 from a cancer she should've never had. It's not provable to say that it was the anti-rejection drugs but I still blame them. They suppress the immune system. People at her age don't get aggressive lymph node cancer.
 
2018-09-19 05:39:23 PM  
Whoever got the liver - hard to say if they were worse for getting the transplant. From what I understand about the conditions that lead to a liver transplant you're generally farked if they can't get you one promptly - there's no dialysis equivalent once your liver fails.
 
2018-09-19 05:48:13 PM  
This was how World War Z kicked off...
 
2018-09-19 05:49:08 PM  

Target Builder: Whoever got the liver - hard to say if they were worse for getting the transplant. From what I understand about the conditions that lead to a liver transplant you're generally farked if they can't get you one promptly - there's no dialysis equivalent once your liver fails.


Depends on how fast the liver goes.  I had a coworker who died from liver failure, a neighbor and my wife's uncle (just last week) died from liver cancer.  It can take some time, 2 to 4 years.  The nice thing about liver transplant, as important of an organ the liver is, the patient can get a donated liver from a living donor.  It's the only organ I'm aware of that they can cut the organ in half, transplant half of it, and both halves will grow into full livers.  The liver simply failing isn't what finishes a person, it's complications along with it.  My coworker died on the surgery table getting his heart worked on so he could receive a donated liver.  The patient has to be sick enough to need it, but strong enough to survive the transplant.  The other two, their cancers had spread to other organs, and a transplant wouldn't have stopped their deaths.
 
2018-09-19 05:49:16 PM  

Radioactive Ass: My mom had a hip replacement and a year later she was dead at 56 from a cancer she should've never had. It's not provable to say that it was the anti-rejection drugs but I still blame them.


Who takes anti-rejection drugs for a hip replacement?
 
2018-09-19 05:56:23 PM  
Did the patients keep their receipt? What's the return policy?
 
2018-09-19 05:56:37 PM  

SansNeural: Skail: Did it come with a free Frogurt?

I don't know.  Did the frog get cancer too?


Only if he got into the potassium benzoate.
 
2018-09-19 05:57:07 PM  

mrmopar5287: Radioactive Ass: My mom had a hip replacement and a year later she was dead at 56 from a cancer she should've never had. It's not provable to say that it was the anti-rejection drugs but I still blame them.

Who takes anti-rejection drugs for a hip replacement?


Yeah, that's an odd one.  The body doesn't try to reject hardware, just foreign tissue transplanted in.  Depending on how close the match to the donor, will dictate what and how much anti-rejection drugs they need.  Also, the people in the article took years for the cancer to kill them, not one year.  Chances are, she had the cancer well before the hip replacement, and it wasn't caught in time.  Only a year?  That's like late stage four before they noticed.  Like stage 5 if they wanted to call it that.

/still, sad for your loss of a mom well before her time RA.
 
2018-09-19 05:58:08 PM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: Did the patients keep their receipt? What's the return policy?


Full return.  Oh, you mean the money?  Yeah that's gone, but the full patient has been returned.
 
2018-09-19 05:58:50 PM  

Mugato: MythDragon: Mugato: Yeah, when I croak you can have everything but my liver. I think everything else is pretty good. Don't waste any time and land on burial bullshiat.

When I deployed, the army doc asked if I wanted to be an organ donor. I said sure, why not. The  he asked me if there were any organs I *didn't* want to donate. I said "yeah, my right testicle." He stops writing, pauses for a moment, and then looks at me. "...what?" "Well you know how people always say 'I'd give my right nut for that'? Well, I'm keeping mine." He just stares for like 20 seconds and asks "are you serious?" "Yes sir. Absolutely." So somewhere in my official government file, it says they cannot take my right testicle.

I was just joking about my liver, I figured the doctor would determine which organs were viable and which weren't and wouldn't leave it up to me. I didn't know it worked like that. Is it a religious thing?


I'm sure that's part of it. It could also just be a personal thing. Maybe you don't want them dicking around with your brain. Maybe you want your heart buried next to your wife. But for whatever reason you can exempt organs you don't want taken.
 
2018-09-19 05:59:09 PM  
Ah, from the CNN link: "After breast cancer cells were detected in her lymph nodes, a DNA analysis showed that the cancer came from the donor."

I suppose that's how they ended up piecing it all together, but I'm still a little surprised they tracked the disparate cases to a single donor.
 
2018-09-19 06:00:30 PM  
So the organ / tissue donor gave them cancer.
/But can he turn into a car?
 
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