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(NYPost)   Good news NYC Straphangers, the MTA's Twitter account responded to a tweet about subway delays saying it will take "the next 5-10 years" to fix. So you have that going for you   ( nypost.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Twitter, MTA, NYCT Subway Twitter, MTA employee, NYCT President Andy, aka 'A New, Twitter handle, New York City Subway  
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1652 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Sep 2018 at 7:05 AM (10 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-09-14 06:04:49 AM  
"5-10 years?" wrote meany. "That is pathetic."

To which the engineer responded, "Aye, laddie. I'm givin' her all she's got, but the most I can give you is 1-2 years at warp 2."
 
2018-09-14 06:41:07 AM  
It fits with the timeline of subby's outdated lingo. It has been well more than 10 years since any subway car had a strap to hang on.
 
2018-09-14 07:10:40 AM  
Aaaah, good ol'  NYC the wotld's most cosmopolitan shiathole.

/fark NYC
 
2018-09-14 07:24:36 AM  
MTA Official Too Nervous To Tell Commuters Waiting For Train That Service Shut Down Permanently An Hour Ago - The Onion
 
2018-09-14 07:29:22 AM  
Grew up downtown in a big city, moved; so happy I never have to pack myself into a subway full of people again.  15 minutes and I'm in farmland now.

/miss the restaurants
/people are too friendly here
 
2018-09-14 08:14:15 AM  
You misunderstand. They mean 5-10 years to fix the Twitter feed.
 
2018-09-14 08:18:17 AM  
media.makeameme.orgView Full Size
 
2018-09-14 09:06:21 AM  
Major renovation projects often take years to complete. News at 11.
 
2018-09-14 09:29:43 AM  
The internet is "the squeaky dipshiat wheels get the headlines" writ large.
 
2018-09-14 09:58:42 AM  
Are we sure it's not the DC metro we're talking about?

Oh wait no that would be 5-50 years.  And on fire the entire time.

/miss NYC metro
 
2018-09-14 10:05:11 AM  
In other news, most of the current MTA Management (including the guy who handles their Twitter account) will be retiring in the next 5-10 year with full pensions funded by taxes and subway fares.
 
2018-09-14 10:09:19 AM  
We'll achieve sustainable nuclear fusion before the MTA is done with their "signal modernization" program.
 
2018-09-14 10:14:35 AM  
l i v a b l e c i t i e s
 
2018-09-14 10:56:26 AM  
It'll take that long just to bleed the money from upstate gas taxes.
 
2018-09-14 11:00:34 AM  
The worst part is that NYC subway ridership is actually about the same as it was around 1950. Seventy years ago the system was better able to handle passengers.
 
2018-09-14 11:32:37 AM  

p89tech: In other news, most of the current MTA Management (including the guy who handles their Twitter account) will be retiring in the next 5-10 year with full pensions funded by taxes and subway fares.


Retiring on disability pensions.
 
2018-09-14 12:13:00 PM  
This is why I take the LIRR into town and then walk 15 blocks to my office. Just a more comfortable, manageable experience.

/75% of the time they don't even take my ticket.
 
2018-09-14 12:22:15 PM  

mrmopar5287: p89tech: In other news, most of the current MTA Management (including the guy who handles their Twitter account) will be retiring in the next 5-10 year with full pensions funded by taxes and subway fares.

Retiring on disability pensions.


This.

The level of pension-rigging in the tri-state area public sector has been off-the-charts. For the LIRR at one not-so-long-ago point it was off the charts.

Virtually every career employee - as many as 97 percent in one recent year - applies for and gets disability payments soon after retirement, a computer analysis of federal records by The New York Times has found. Since 2000, those records show, about a quarter of a billion dollars in federal disability money has gone to former L.I.R.R. employees, including about 2,000 who retired during that time.

The L.I.R.R.'s disability rate suggests it is one of the nation's most dangerous places to work. Yet in four of the last five years, the railroad has won national awards for improving worker safety.

"Short of the gulag, I can't imagine any work force that would have a so-to-speak 90 percent disability attrition rate," said Glenn Scammel, long one of Capitol Hill's top experts on railroads. "That defies both logic and experience."

Said Dr. J. Mark Melhorn, co-editor of a book on occupational disability published by the American Medical Association: "No one has a rate that high - that just doesn't happen."

And it is not just engineers, conductors or track workers seeking disability payments. Dozens of retired white-collar managers are doing it as well, including the former deputy general counsel, employment manager, claims manager and director of government and community affairs.


Tell us another one about noble, honest public sector unions.
 
2018-09-14 01:27:35 PM  

Exluddite: It fits with the timeline of subby's outdated lingo. It has been well more than 10 years since any subway car had a strap to hang on.


What about a subway rider with a strap-on? It's NYC, after all.
 
2018-09-14 03:00:28 PM  
Oh come on! Give out a real estimate.
 
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