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(Lancaster Eagle Gazette)   64-year-old mystery of baby found in telephone booth by bread delivery men solved, leaving only two questions: Why did they only deliver bread, and why did a telephone need a room all to itself?   (lancastereaglegazette.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Family, Parent, 2003 in film, Dennis, Adoption, DNA, bread delivery men, Mother  
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4367 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Aug 2018 at 6:50 PM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-08-20 04:51:09 PM  
Should have named him Dennis.
 
2018-08-20 06:47:34 PM  
My dad delivered only bread for the Tip Top company in Pittsburgh until they went out of business sometime in the 1960s.

The guy in the story is lucky his found birth mom is still living, she's 85. Sucks why he was left there.
 
2018-08-20 06:56:13 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

/ The bonus is abandoned children
 
2018-08-20 06:57:32 PM  
wel done Subby!
 
2018-08-20 06:59:51 PM  
Specialty breads?
 
2018-08-20 07:00:42 PM  
I don't think I'd have any desire to find my mother had she abandoned me.
 
2018-08-20 07:00:59 PM  
masterofsomethingyet.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-20 07:02:35 PM  
Much like computers, back in the 1960's, telephones were huge and took up a whole room.
 
2018-08-20 07:03:02 PM  

yakmans_dad: [masterofsomethingyet.files.wordpress​.​com image 490x372]


A HAAAAAANDBAAAAAAAG???!!!!??!!!11!!!
 
TWX
2018-08-20 07:08:41 PM  
It's funny, in the article he mused about wanting to know his own birthday, but that his bio-mom doesn't remember anymore. Previously in the article it was disclosed that he was born in a hospital while on that road trip.

Seems like it shouldn't be all that difficult to narrow down what records need to be dug-into. If he really was left while they were on that road-trip then it's probably within a month of when he was found, possibly within a couple of weeks. Narrow it down that way, look for her original name in the hospital records, might come up with a match.
 
2018-08-20 07:11:37 PM  
Sixty four year old baby?

Oh, yeah, I misread that. Well, since I've nothing else to offer, how about a 72 y/o baby?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-20 07:12:02 PM  
FTA on meeting his birth mother:

"It's interesting. It's not earth shattering or anything like that," Dennis said. "My true parents, of course, were my adoptive parents. It would be almost impossible for me to think otherwise."

I like this guy.
 
2018-08-20 07:14:03 PM  

edmo: Should have named him Dennis.


The way that awful article was written, I thought his first name WAS Dennis.
I mean...
FTFA; "After the first story published, dozens of people had expressed interest in either fostering or adopting the baby. Dennis was placed in a foster home and later adopted by the Dennis family in February 1955. They moved to Arizona where Dennis has resided ever since. "
 
2018-08-20 07:17:04 PM  

TWX: It's funny, in the article he mused about wanting to know his own birthday, but that his bio-mom doesn't remember anymore. Previously in the article it was disclosed that he was born in a hospital while on that road trip.

Seems like it shouldn't be all that difficult to narrow down what records need to be dug-into. If he really was left while they were on that road-trip then it's probably within a month of when he was found, possibly within a couple of weeks. Narrow it down that way, look for her original name in the hospital records, might come up with a match.


The hospital might not exist or might not have the records any more, but they almost certainly would have filed a birth certificate with the city or county health department or bureau of vital statistics.
 
2018-08-20 07:18:03 PM  

TWX: It's funny, in the article he mused about wanting to know his own birthday, but that his bio-mom doesn't remember anymore. Previously in the article it was disclosed that he was born in a hospital while on that road trip.

Seems like it shouldn't be all that difficult to narrow down what records need to be dug-into. If he really was left while they were on that road-trip then it's probably within a month of when he was found, possibly within a couple of weeks. Narrow it down that way, look for her original name in the hospital records, might come up with a match.


Those records would not be in a computer, you would need to know the name of the hospital. Not being married back in those days, his mother may not have used her real name.
I'm close to his age, and the hospital I was born in doesn't even exist anymore.
 
2018-08-20 07:24:39 PM  
He sends so very zen about it all.
 
2018-08-20 07:26:08 PM  
So. Life was then what it is now except on a much smaller scale. Back then before interstates, yo traveled state highways or national highways through towns. With interstate roads you cans ditch a baby somewhere and no one would find it before it died. This guy was born in a good timeline.
 
2018-08-20 07:33:22 PM  

geekbikerskum: TWX: It's funny, in the article he mused about wanting to know his own birthday, but that his bio-mom doesn't remember anymore. Previously in the article it was disclosed that he was born in a hospital while on that road trip.

Seems like it shouldn't be all that difficult to narrow down what records need to be dug-into. If he really was left while they were on that road-trip then it's probably within a month of when he was found, possibly within a couple of weeks. Narrow it down that way, look for her original name in the hospital records, might come up with a match.

The hospital might not exist or might not have the records any more, but they almost certainly would have filed a birth certificate with the city or county health department or bureau of vital statistics.


Perhaps it's not important to him. After all, he is retired from a career and traveling the world. Gotta wonder though, how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?
 
2018-08-20 07:37:22 PM  

WTFDYW: how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?


He does have a birth certificate; there's even an image of it with the article.  It lists the date and place he was found as his date and place of birth.

Besides, it wasn't uncommon for people born before about the mid 20th century to not have birth certificates.  People were born at home more often. Wasn't until about the 1950s or '60s when nearly everybody started being born in a hospital, and it wasn't until the crunchy-granola hippie-types started lobbying for it that midwife-assisted home births became okay again.
 
2018-08-20 07:42:09 PM  
Gotta wonder though, how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?

He has a birth certificate; there's a photo of it in the article.
 
2018-08-20 07:42:44 PM  

The Lurker at Your Threshold: Sixty four year old baby?

Oh, yeah, I misread that. Well, since I've nothing else to offer, how about a 72 y/o baby?

[img.fark.net image 225x225]


Still nothing
 
2018-08-20 07:43:11 PM  
Would have been funnier if they bread guys had actually delivered the baby. They know all about getting buns fresh from the oven to the customer.
 
2018-08-20 07:44:40 PM  
Being adopted I can relate to his attitude "I know who my real parents are", and nothing about my biological ones. I do have some clues, born at Great Lakes Naval Hospital so daddy was in the navy, mother divorced him before I was born. Women did not do that in 1950. Mother was catholic so I got to be me but alone. Adopted parents had the great intelligence to leave Chicago in the middle of a snow storm with me in the back seat of a Studebaker convertible so I got to have my first birthday in Southern California.

Do you what it is like to get a security clearance from the NSA and CIA with no traceable relatives?

No reason at 68 years old to bother to look for anyone, I have no children by choice, adoption was good enough for me so I figured if I got that desire then I would adopt.
 
2018-08-20 07:45:59 PM  
Yielky's Restaurant was at 1570 East Main, from what I can figure out.
 
2018-08-20 07:47:31 PM  

PapermonkeyExpress: The Lurker at Your Threshold: Sixty four year old baby?

Oh, yeah, I misread that. Well, since I've nothing else to offer, how about a 72 y/o baby?

[img.fark.net image 225x225]

Still nothing


One might even say King Nothing.
 
2018-08-20 07:49:07 PM  
Please tell me he hasn't pinned his hope to a phone booth...
 
2018-08-20 07:54:15 PM  
This is the most messed up part:

"He was told his mother was 18 and coerced to give him up by his father, saying he'd marry her if they left the baby. The couple was traveling through Ohio from Kentucky, where he was born in a hospital. They were on their way back to Maryland when the father took the baby and left him in a phone booth. After that, the father disappeared."

Wow.  Dad was a supreme a-hole.
 
2018-08-20 07:59:58 PM  

geekbikerskum: WTFDYW: how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?

He does have a birth certificate; there's even an image of it with the article.  It lists the date and place he was found as his date and place of birth.

Besides, it wasn't uncommon for people born before about the mid 20th century to not have birth certificates.  People were born at home more often. Wasn't until about the 1950s or '60s when nearly everybody started being born in a hospital, and it wasn't until the crunchy-granola hippie-types started lobbying for it that midwife-assisted home births became okay again.


Thanks for rattling history that I have forgotten reading out of my mind and back to daylight. You are correct.
 
2018-08-20 08:02:50 PM  
Why did they only deliver bread?  Why, for the dough, of course.

I'll go stand in a corner and punch myself.
 
2018-08-20 08:03:32 PM  

Human Dude: edmo: Should have named him Dennis.

The way that awful article was written, I thought his first name WAS Dennis.
I mean...
FTFA; "After the first story published, dozens of people had expressed interest in either fostering or adopting the baby. Dennis was placed in a foster home and later adopted by the Dennis family in February 1955. They moved to Arizona where Dennis has resided ever since. "


Dennis Dennis. His maternal grandfather was Major Major.
 
2018-08-20 08:05:16 PM  
Year two of mystery: "Mystery solved, it's not a baby anymore!".
 
2018-08-20 08:06:56 PM  

geekbikerskum: WTFDYW: how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?

He does have a birth certificate; there's even an image of it with the article.  It lists the date and place he was found as his date and place of birth.

Besides, it wasn't uncommon for people born before about the mid 20th century to not have birth certificates.  People were born at home more often. Wasn't until about the 1950s or '60s when nearly everybody started being born in a hospital, and it wasn't until the crunchy-granola hippie-types started lobbying for it that midwife-assisted home births became okay again.


My mom was one of 16. The last one was hospital born, the first 15 she dropped in the bedroom.  As far as I can tell only gramps assisted, no mid-wife. Pioneers I tell you.
 
2018-08-20 08:13:55 PM  

NotThatGuyAgain: I don't think I'd have any desire to find my mother had she abandoned me.


Nope. When I was five I accidentally found out my father didn't want anything to do with me. Up until that time I had occasionally asked about him but was told "You'll understand more when you are older". After I found that out, he was dead to me and I never asked about him again nor have I had any desire to find out anything about him. Sounds like this guy is approaching this with the right attitude and I wish him luck.
 
2018-08-20 08:15:05 PM  

Eddie Adams from Torrance: Much like computers, back in the 1960's, telephones were huge and took up a whole room.


Top Secret! Phone perspective
Youtube QJoTBlDfVhk
 
2018-08-20 08:16:01 PM  

WTFDYW: Thanks for rattling history that I have forgotten reading out of my mind and back to daylight. You are correct.


Thank you, and you're welcome.

I don't know how it is now with all the REAL ID stuff, and tightening up of requirements for identification, but it used to be that state DMVs would take all sorts of things as proof of age, including baptismal records, notes written in family Bibles, and birth announcements published in the newspaper, because of the large number of people born outside of hospitals.  Basically any credible, contemporaneous record that would document your identity and date of birth.

Not to mention official records that were lost in natural disasters, huge fires, war, etc.  When my mother (who was born in Germany) went to renew her NJ driver's license back in 2002, she had to bring her birth certificate with her.  Now, she was born in the '30s in a city in Germany that was bombed pretty heavily during the war.  When we talked about this, she said she wouldn't know if an official copy of her birth certificate would even still exist on file somewhere.  (Never mind the ridiculousness of bringing in an official document that's not even written in English and that a DMV clerk is unlikely to be able to read, but that's a whole other discussion).   She was lucky she had a personal copy, which had kept at home by her parents, and which was given to her at some point in the process of resettling in the U.S. in the early 1950s.  She also had to bring in her naturalization paperwork, documenting legal status in the U.S., and her marriage license, to document her name change.  Yeesh.
 
2018-08-20 08:16:07 PM  

softshoes: geekbikerskum: WTFDYW: how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?

He does have a birth certificate; there's even an image of it with the article.  It lists the date and place he was found as his date and place of birth.

Besides, it wasn't uncommon for people born before about the mid 20th century to not have birth certificates.  People were born at home more often. Wasn't until about the 1950s or '60s when nearly everybody started being born in a hospital, and it wasn't until the crunchy-granola hippie-types started lobbying for it that midwife-assisted home births became okay again.

My mom was one of 16. The last one was hospital born, the first 15 she dropped in the bedroom.  As far as I can tell only gramps assisted, no mid-wife. Pioneers I tell you.


And lucky.  As a whole, the death rate at birth for both mothers and infants was astronomical before modern medicine.  It's perhaps one of the greatest achievements of modern civilization.  Unassisted home birth is great when there are no problems, but it can go south quickly if there is a problem that requires surgical intervention.   A prevailing theory is that the pelvic geometry of becoming bipedal had the unfortunate side-effect of difficult birthing.
 
2018-08-20 08:17:07 PM  
If choose right telephone box ...

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-20 08:19:25 PM  

softshoes: My mom was one of 16. The last one was hospital born, the first 15 she dropped in the bedroom.  As far as I can tell only gramps assisted, no mid-wife. Pioneers I tell you.


"Get that would you Deidre"

Monty Python - catholics.avi
Youtube AsWxkU0g9Z4
 
2018-08-20 08:41:21 PM  

EnglishMajor: Gotta wonder though, how did he get by all these years without a birth certificate?

He has a birth certificate; there's a photo of it in the article.


Ok. I'm on my phone. It's not one of those tablet sized phones.
 
2018-08-20 08:49:05 PM  
They put the phones in booths so people couldn't look over your shoulder and read your texts.
 
2018-08-20 09:03:19 PM  

MarkMartinFan: Being adopted I can relate to his attitude "I know who my real parents are", and nothing about my biological ones. I do have some clues, born at Great Lakes Naval Hospital so daddy was in the navy, mother divorced him before I was born. Women did not do that in 1950. Mother was catholic so I got to be me but alone. Adopted parents had the great intelligence to leave Chicago in the middle of a snow storm with me in the back seat of a Studebaker convertible so I got to have my first birthday in Southern California.


This, only I was born in Indiana and my adoptive parents had the great good sense to get me out of that hellhole before I turned 1.

Between people always asking me "do you know your birth mother?" and TV shows and movies where the plot revolves around "OMG I was adopted I have to find my birth parents or I'll be incomplete" it's nice to know that other people feel similar to me - that my real parents were the ones who raised me.

Sure, I have some curiosity about it - mainly for medical reasons - but not enough to be arsed to go looking.

Besides, that would mean visiting Indiana. No thanks.
 
2018-08-20 09:17:38 PM  
Abandoned phone booth baby would be a good band name.
 
2018-08-20 09:41:43 PM  
why did a telephone need a room all to itself?

We used to have this fantastic thing called privacy, and others respected yours. Yay for social media!!
 
2018-08-20 09:48:18 PM  

harlock: This is the most messed up part:

"He was told his mother was 18 and coerced to give him up by his father, saying he'd marry her if they left the baby. The couple was traveling through Ohio from Kentucky, where he was born in a hospital. They were on their way back to Maryland when the father took the baby and left him in a phone booth. After that, the father disappeared."

Wow.  Dad was a supreme a-hole.


Not to be annoying, but... If he is 64, and his mom is 85, she was most definitely not 18 when he was born.
 
2018-08-20 09:52:10 PM  
My dad delivered ice cream. I wonder where he found me.
 
2018-08-20 10:00:29 PM  

MarkMartinFan: Being adopted I can relate to his attitude "I know who my real parents are", and nothing about my biological ones. I do have some clues, born at Great Lakes Naval Hospital so daddy was in the navy, mother divorced him before I was born. Women did not do that in 1950. Mother was catholic so I got to be me but alone. Adopted parents had the great intelligence to leave Chicago in the middle of a snow storm with me in the back seat of a Studebaker convertible so I got to have my first birthday in Southern California.

Do you what it is like to get a security clearance from the NSA and CIA with no traceable relatives?

No reason at 68 years old to bother to look for anyone, I have no children by choice, adoption was good enough for me so I figured if I got that desire then I would adopt.


And you'd be the hit of the local Studebaker club's meeting with that story.  Bonus points if you have pictures of the convertible.

/Not kidding.  In the club myself.
 
2018-08-20 10:00:39 PM  

Madman drummers bummers: MarkMartinFan: Being adopted I can relate to his attitude "I know who my real parents are", and nothing about my biological ones. I do have some clues, born at Great Lakes Naval Hospital so daddy was in the navy, mother divorced him before I was born. Women did not do that in 1950. Mother was catholic so I got to be me but alone. Adopted parents had the great intelligence to leave Chicago in the middle of a snow storm with me in the back seat of a Studebaker convertible so I got to have my first birthday in Southern California.

This, only I was born in Indiana and my adoptive parents had the great good sense to get me out of that hellhole before I turned 1.

Between people always asking me "do you know your birth mother?" and TV shows and movies where the plot revolves around "OMG I was adopted I have to find my birth parents or I'll be incomplete" it's nice to know that other people feel similar to me - that my real parents were the ones who raised me.

Sure, I have some curiosity about it - mainly for medical reasons - but not enough to be arsed to go looking.

Besides, that would mean visiting Indiana. No thanks.


Ha! You live in Virginia and you're complaining about Indiana! That's funny!
 
2018-08-20 10:03:59 PM  

lindalouwho: My dad delivered only bread for the Tip Top company in Pittsburgh until they went out of business sometime in the 1960s.

The guy in the story is lucky his found birth mom is still living, she's 85. Sucks why he was left there.


I used to deliver Taystee bread and we had Tip Top drivers working for us in the NY metro area.
 
2018-08-20 10:09:25 PM  

harlock: This is the most messed up part:

"He was told his mother was 18 and coerced to give him up by his father, saying he'd marry her if they left the baby. The couple was traveling through Ohio from Kentucky, where he was born in a hospital. They were on their way back to Maryland when the father took the baby and left him in a phone booth. After that, the father disappeared."

Wow.  Dad was a supreme a-hole.


He was a real heel.
 
2018-08-20 10:29:56 PM  

cakeman: lindalouwho: My dad delivered only bread for the Tip Top company in Pittsburgh until they went out of business sometime in the 1960s.

The guy in the story is lucky his found birth mom is still living, she's 85. Sucks why he was left there.

I used to deliver Taystee bread and we had Tip Top drivers working for us in the NY metro area.


My dad was in no position to move very far away, my third sibling wasn't even a year old when he was forced to look for a new job. My mom worked for Thorofare grocery store and a few years later they went out of business. As a result, I when I started working I had no expectation of job security before it was cool. Made me unafraid to change jobs, so that was a benefit.
 
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