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(Fox News)   Hailing frequencies scrambled, captain   ( foxnews.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Nichelle Nichols, Dr. Meena Makhijani, Uhura, Star Trek: The Animated Series, Time, Star Trek: The Original Series, moderate impairment, Nichols  
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4409 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 11 Aug 2018 at 3:33 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-08-10 11:26:03 PM  
Fox News, subby? Maybe you should get tested, too.
 
2018-08-10 11:54:11 PM  
That's a horrible horrible headline subby.

/+🍎
 
2018-08-11 12:09:09 AM  
Fark me running, man. Not Nichelle Nichols. If she has to go, let it please be with dignity.
 
2018-08-11 12:09:10 AM  

GooberMcFly: That's a horrible horrible headline subby.

/+🍎


Oh, it's not like she'll know the difference.
 
2018-08-11 12:15:23 AM  

Demetrius: Fark me running, man. Not Nichelle Nichols. If she has to go, let it please be with dignity.


She deserves dignity.
 
2018-08-11 01:06:07 AM  
Maybe Star Trek V will finally make sense to her.
 
2018-08-11 03:33:19 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 03:56:40 AM  
She's 85 and is just now being diagnosed.

That's called winning at life.
 
2018-08-11 04:02:09 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 04:07:54 AM  
the actress, 85, has "moderate progressive dementia."

An affliction that Fox also attributes to Jeff Flake and John McCain.
 
2018-08-11 04:16:15 AM  
Set phasers to pancakes.


😢
 
2018-08-11 04:17:19 AM  
watchtheyard.comView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 04:30:35 AM  
68.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
static.pulzo.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 04:34:30 AM  

fusillade762: the actress, 85, has "moderate progressive dementia."

An affliction that Fox also attributes to Jeff Flake and John McCain.


Wouldn't it be "moderate conservative dementia"?
 
2018-08-11 04:35:13 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 04:45:41 AM  
Fark that headline. Poor choice modmitter
 
2018-08-11 05:19:06 AM  

buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]


At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.
 
2018-08-11 05:23:17 AM  
Sorry its going down like that.  Dementia was part of my dad's life in his later years.  Its really sucky to sit in the same room as your living, breathing loved one & know they are not there & never will be again.

Dad knew it was coming. I can't imagine how much worse it was for him, seeing the train coming & knowing there was no getting off the tracks.
 
2018-08-11 05:54:27 AM  
Sad news, hope she's well taken care of. Always the good ones.
 
2018-08-11 06:01:34 AM  

Kid Shelleen: buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]

At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.


The genre matters. Sci-fi before the 60s was always seen as a geeky white nerd's genre. There were a lot of geeky black people who were interested in science and engineering that loved these space shows as well, and they didn't have any representation. Levar Burton and Whoopi Goldberg have both admitted that it was because of Uhura that they not only got into science fiction, but into Star Trek specifically.
 
2018-08-11 06:05:19 AM  
Although I never met her, I can truly say I have never met her.
 
2018-08-11 06:31:29 AM  
Even to this day I would use her panties to make sun tea...
 
2018-08-11 06:58:46 AM  

cabbyman: Even to this day I would use her panties to make sun tea...


Go on...
 
2018-08-11 07:25:58 AM  

Ishkur: Kid Shelleen: buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]

At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.

The genre matters. Sci-fi before the 60s was always seen as a geeky white nerd's genre. There were a lot of geeky black people who were interested in science and engineering that loved these space shows as well, and they didn't have any representation. Levar Burton and Whoopi Goldberg have both admitted that it was because of Uhura that they not only got into science fiction, but into Star Trek specifically.


I guess I see your point, but disagree. The genre that matters here is "popular prime time TV show," not "sci-fi TV show."  The point illustrated in the above anecdote.by Ms. Nichols is how blacks were portrayed in popular culture, not just sci-fi. 

M:I was a longer running, more popular show than Star Trek. How many kids were inspired to become engineers or scientists because of Barney?  We don't know, because they don't get interviewed on talk shows.
 
2018-08-11 07:26:58 AM  
Fortunately, she's likely rich enough to receive proper care in a facility where she can be treated respectfully, and cared for.  Her son had fiduciaries appointed for her, and they seem to have a plan.

My elderly dad and his wife both seem to be having elder rage issues, she seems to be starting with with memory loss and planning issues.  He's already making poor financial choices.  But, they both refuse to consider getting treatment, or going into any kind of assisted living situation.  They're more concerned about the stigma of mental health, than in getting help while they still can.

They're far richer than I am, so I have no hope of forcing anything legally on their behalf.
 
2018-08-11 07:27:30 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

Damn, that's hot.
 
2018-08-11 08:04:32 AM  

Ishkur: Kid Shelleen: buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]

At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.

The genre matters. Sci-fi before the 60s was always seen as a geeky white nerd's genre. There were a lot of geeky black people who were interested in science and engineering that loved these space shows as well, and they didn't have any representation. Levar Burton and Whoopi Goldberg have both admitted that it was because of Uhura that they not only got into science fiction, but into Star Trek specifically.


CSB: my sister was mentioned in a tweet with Brent Spiner the other day and he liked it. She spent the day making this face:
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 08:06:13 AM  
Damn sad news.

How I love that show. I was born in 1961 so had the luck to have watched the original series on television. It implanted my love for all things sci fi. I still watch reruns of the original series regularly. Have never seen any of the others.

Be well beautiful lady.
 
2018-08-11 08:06:49 AM  
Damn you, NOMAD!
Star Trek - Memory Erased
Youtube XR6jDBi5UZc
 
2018-08-11 08:31:25 AM  
I saw her at Comiccon in Ottawa in 2015 and she was beautiful. She entered singing the Star Trek theme and had a wonderful grace about her. It was clear, though, that she was in the early stages of dementia. She seemed not to understand the questions and gave the same rehearsed answer over and over again...something about respect. It made me sad. My son, 13 at the time, noticed it, too. She is a treasure and I hope she has some islands of contentment and clarity ahead of her. Dementia is cruel. Dementia teaches us to live in the moment and appreciate joy whenever it occurs. Other than that, fark dementia.
 
2018-08-11 08:45:21 AM  
Uhura Distraction
Youtube PZu5f3mdh9Y
 
2018-08-11 08:46:37 AM  

jmr61: Damn sad news.

How I love that show. I was born in 1961 so had the luck to have watched the original series on television. It implanted my love for all things sci fi. I still watch reruns of the original series regularly. Have never seen any of the others.

Be well beautiful lady.


For anyone who's interested, there's a remastered complete series available with some bonus features and touched-up fx (mainly the outer space sequences). Holds up pretty well, and still appeals to the kids.
 
2018-08-11 08:50:57 AM  

grokca: [img.fark.net image 498x665]
Damn, that's hot.


Mirror Uhura is hottest Uhura.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-11 09:08:37 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: jmr61: Damn sad news.

How I love that show. I was born in 1961 so had the luck to have watched the original series on television. It implanted my love for all things sci fi. I still watch reruns of the original series regularly. Have never seen any of the others.

Be well beautiful lady.

For anyone who's interested, there's a remastered complete series available with some bonus features and touched-up fx (mainly the outer space sequences). Holds up pretty well, and still appeals to the kids.


Also, the same set has the non-retouched versions of every episode in full remastered HD, too.
 
2018-08-11 10:41:27 AM  
Brilliant headline. From it, I knew exactly what the article was going to say and I laughed. That's hard to do.
 
2018-08-11 10:48:04 AM  

FreakyBunny: I saw her at Comiccon in Ottawa in 2015 and she was beautiful. She entered singing the Star Trek theme and had a wonderful grace about her. It was clear, though, that she was in the early stages of dementia. She seemed not to understand the questions and gave the same rehearsed answer over and over again...something about respect. It made me sad. My son, 13 at the time, noticed it, too. She is a treasure and I hope she has some islands of contentment and clarity ahead of her. Dementia is cruel. Dementia teaches us to live in the moment and appreciate joy whenever it occurs. Other than that, fark dementia.


My aunt (technically she was my first cousin once removed but she had kids older than me so she was Aunt Marion) had the slow slide into dementia. It was interesting because she was the happiest person on the memory wing. She would spend all day either wandering the halls or sitting in the common room just singing away. Yes, she had a very nice voice and sang happy songs and other residents would brighten up when she passed them. It was hard on the family and my Mom would go visit her regularly but everyone agreed she was living a happy life.

I hope for something similar for a wonderful actress and role model.
 
2018-08-11 10:52:47 AM  

buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]


The first time I heard the story she said she imagined what MLK would tell her.  The second time I heard that story she got a phone call from MLK.  Then finally, he showed up to meet her in person.

Perhaps all the versions of story are true.
 
2018-08-11 10:55:45 AM  

Kid Shelleen: Ishkur: Kid Shelleen: buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]

At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.

The genre matters. Sci-fi before the 60s was always seen as a geeky white nerd's genre. There were a lot of geeky black people who were interested in science and engineering that loved these space shows as well, and they didn't have any representation. Levar Burton and Whoopi Goldberg have both admitted that it was because of Uhura that they not only got into science fiction, but into Star Trek specifically.

I guess I see your point, but disagree. The genre that matters here is "popular prime time TV show," not "sci-fi TV show."  The point illustrated in the above anecdote.by Ms. Nichols is how blacks were portrayed in popular culture, not just sci-fi. 

M:I was a longer running, more popular show than Star Trek. How many kids were inspired to become engineers or scientists because of Barney?  We don't know, because they don't get interviewed on talk shows.


She portrayed the first black female recurring character on prime time television that wasn't subservient - a maid, housekeeper or the like. In fact, her role was the opposite - a high-ranking officer on the flagship of the fleet.

That's what MLK was referring to - she was the only black woman on TV whose character wasn't a servant but was, instead, in an earned position of authority.

Am glad she decided to stay with the show.
 
2018-08-11 11:13:37 AM  
Who the fark keeps submitting and approving Fox News stories? I refuse to click on that shiat.
 
2018-08-11 11:17:30 AM  

clams_casino: Kid Shelleen: Ishkur: Kid Shelleen: buravirgil: [watchtheyard.com image 498x665]
[img.fark.net image 500x741]

At that time, we had Kinch on Hogan's Heroes, Barney on M:I, and Uhura playing "equal" roles, not necessarily "black" roles. In fact, Kinch and Barney were techies, one a radio man, the other an electronic engineer and spy.

Ms. Nichols is rightly credited for her role, but Barney and Kinch deserve some love, too.

Arguably, the Cos on I Spy, too.

The genre matters. Sci-fi before the 60s was always seen as a geeky white nerd's genre. There were a lot of geeky black people who were interested in science and engineering that loved these space shows as well, and they didn't have any representation. Levar Burton and Whoopi Goldberg have both admitted that it was because of Uhura that they not only got into science fiction, but into Star Trek specifically.

I guess I see your point, but disagree. The genre that matters here is "popular prime time TV show," not "sci-fi TV show."  The point illustrated in the above anecdote.by Ms. Nichols is how blacks were portrayed in popular culture, not just sci-fi. 

M:I was a longer running, more popular show than Star Trek. How many kids were inspired to become engineers or scientists because of Barney?  We don't know, because they don't get interviewed on talk shows.

She portrayed the first black female recurring character on prime time television that wasn't subservient - a maid, housekeeper or the like. In fact, her role was the opposite - a high-ranking officer on the flagship of the fleet.

That's what MLK was referring to - she was the only black woman on TV whose character wasn't a servant but was, instead, in an earned position of authority.

Am glad she decided to stay with the show.


I agree, but disagree that's what Dr. King was saying, based on the story. According to the anecdote, he said, "us," implying the race, not just "black women."  So my larger point is, if this is what Dr. King told her, I disagree with him. Frankly, I idolized Barney, thought he was cool and he probably had an influence in me becoming a scientist/engineer.

On a more subtle note, though she was an officer, she still held the "receptionist" position on the bridge. The canon that all who passed through Starfleet were battle tested was still being built. It wasn't really made crystal clear until the TNG episode that had Dr. Crusher put in charge of the Enterprise. Of course, that's my memory, so I could very well be wrong.

Was Uhura ever left in charge of the ship in TOS?  Can't recall
 
2018-08-11 11:29:53 AM  

gregario: Who the fark keeps submitting and approving Fox News stories? I refuse to click on that shiat.


So, you're so wrapped around your politics that you reject even completely non-political articles from them?

How tolerant of you.
 
2018-08-11 11:30:06 AM  

Kid Shelleen: M:I was a longer running, more popular show than Star Trek.


Apparently not if no one remembers the black actor in it.
 
2018-08-11 11:32:57 AM  

Kid Shelleen: Was Uhura ever left in charge of the ship in TOS?  Can't recall


No.
 
2018-08-11 11:38:53 AM  

Kid Shelleen: Was Uhura ever left in charge of the ship in TOS?  Can't recall


No, the order ended up being Kirk/Spock/Scotty/Sulu. Women weren't allowed to captain a ship in Starfleet, which was one of the dumbest things TOS ever did, regardless of what other barriers it broke or the time in which it came about. If nothing else, it makes no sense given that the pilot episode had a female first officer.
 
2018-08-11 11:46:56 AM  

Kid Shelleen: Was Uhura ever left in charge of the ship in TOS? Can't recall


--Uhura was given temporary command of the Enterprise, in at least one of the TOS-based paperback books - as well as the animated series.

https://www.amazon.com/Crisis-Centaur​u​s-Star-Trek-Original-ebook/dp/B000FBJH​IU/ref=pd_sim_351_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc​=1&refRID=3JC6RRWSA9NHEKRVGX8E

https://scifi.stackexchange.com/quest​i​ons/36873/enterprise-chain-of-command

https://screenrant.com/star-trek-uhur​a​-facts-trivia/

--Just finished re-reading Crisis on Centaurus recently, it's an excellent read.  Uhura gives a profound example of how to speak to a grieving person: " I'm so sorry for your pain, sir "

--You want someone to know you have their back, say something like that and mean it -- and show up at their house later with food.  Don't shortchange them with "thoughts and prayers" BS.  And tell them if they ever need to get away from everything for a bit, you would be willing to take them to lunch/pool/poker/etc and they can even stay at your place for a night or so.  THAT is being there for True Family.
 
2018-08-11 11:48:20 AM  

Ishkur: Kid Shelleen: M:I was a longer running, more popular show than Star Trek.

Apparently not if no one remembers the black actor in it.


So you're saying it didn't run longer because of higher ratings?

I think, to assess the anecdote, you need to place yourself in the mid-60s, not today.

And obviously, I remember him. But he and his role were not made a cause celebre, so that's why you're not aware of him. Or you pehaps weren't alive then. I have no window into your perspective.
 
2018-08-11 11:50:55 AM  

clams_casino: She portrayed the first black female recurring character on prime time television that wasn't subservient - a maid, housekeeper or the like. In fact, her role was the opposite - a high-ranking officer on the flagship of the fleet.


I would not call the person doing communications a "high-ranking" officer especially when holding the rank of lieutenant    Not to mention stuff like "Captain, I'm scared."  Admittedly the hangup was that she was a woman and not that she was black as the series often showed blacks in position of authority and/or responsibility and/or technical expertise.
 
2018-08-11 11:51:05 AM  

swahnhennessy: Kid Shelleen: Was Uhura ever left in charge of the ship in TOS?  Can't recall

No, the order ended up being Kirk/Spock/Scotty/Sulu. Women weren't allowed to captain a ship in Starfleet, which was one of the dumbest things TOS ever did, regardless of what other barriers it broke or the time in which it came about. If nothing else, it makes no sense given that the pilot episode had a female first officer.


Well, that's precisely why they rejected showing the pilot and chopped it up into The Managerie. Nobody was going to believe a female would be in charge.
 
2018-08-11 11:55:20 AM  

TheMysteriousStranger: clams_casino: She portrayed the first black female recurring character on prime time television that wasn't subservient - a maid, housekeeper or the like. In fact, her role was the opposite - a high-ranking officer on the flagship of the fleet.

I would not call the person doing communications a "high-ranking" officer especially when holding the rank of lieutenant    Not to mention stuff like "Captain, I'm scared."  Admittedly the hangup was that she was a woman and not that she was black as the series often showed blacks in position of authority and/or responsibility and/or technical expertise.


img.fark.netView Full Size


"If I'd had two good arms I'd made it over that fence and been an Admiral!"
 
2018-08-11 12:11:16 PM  

swahnhennessy: No, the order ended up being Kirk/Spock/Scotty/Sulu. Women weren't allowed to captain a ship in Starfleet, which was one of the dumbest things TOS ever did, regardless of what other barriers it broke or the time in which it came about. If nothing else, it makes no sense given that the pilot episode had a female first officer.


That's probably why. Test audiences hated her (it was Majer Barrett too, who was later recast as Nurse Chapel). It wasn't the men -- they didn't mind a female first officer at all. It was the women -- "who the hell does she think she is, bossing men around like that?!" Apparently women back then just weren't ready for a strong, powerful woman in a position of authority and power. And as recent events have shown, they still aren't.
 
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