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(The Verge)   The worst part about running a publically traded company is the public   ( theverge.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Stock market, Musk, Public company, Initial public offering, Stock, Tesla, Elon Musk, Twitter  
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873 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Aug 2018 at 10:12 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



8 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-08-09 07:34:58 PM  
Publically
Publicly

TYVM
 
2018-08-09 10:28:45 PM  
Deal with it. 

Either pony up the cash, or ignore the public. 

For someone who has lots of money, Musk has never figured out how to have his actions speak louder than his words.
 
2018-08-09 11:09:02 PM  
He's just upset that the Delaware Court of Chancery didn't dismiss the lawsuit accusing him of breaching his fiduciary duties in connection with Tesla's acquisition of Solar City.
 
2018-08-10 12:00:44 AM  
A tech company attracts people with stock options. I wonder if Tesla would have trouble getting top talent if the stock will never trade on an open market to establish its price.
 
2018-08-10 12:05:38 AM  
A friend just sent me a pretty funny article about the SEC's interest in this development:

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/article​s/2018-08-09/musk-s-money-mystery-intr​igues-sec

That is a lot of financing to keep so secret. It feels like the solution to the puzzle is going to end up being something weird and tiresome, like Musk will tweet that when he said "funding secured" he meant that he has drafted the white paper for the PrivateTeslaCoin initial coin offering, or bought a lot of scratch-off lottery tickets, or minted a platinum coin with "$1 trillion" stamped on it, or that the real financing is the friends we made along the way.
 
2018-08-10 08:36:40 AM  
Yes. Taking a company public is basically making a deal with the devil.

You trade the ability to do things with ROIs longer than a year for piles of money.
 
2018-08-10 10:56:35 AM  

Weng: Yes. Taking a company public is basically making a deal with the devil.

You trade the ability to do things with ROIs longer than a year for piles of money.


Bull my company is publicly traded and has exceeded in their 5 to 10 year planning.  We have products with 25 year production cycles.
 
2018-08-10 11:10:58 AM  

American-Irish eyes: Weng: Yes. Taking a company public is basically making a deal with the devil.

You trade the ability to do things with ROIs longer than a year for piles of money.

Bull my company is publicly traded and has exceeded in their 5 to 10 year planning.  We have products with 25 year production cycles.


Yeah, specific unsexy companies can attract investors (and board members) with the ability to see beyond the end of the quarter, but that's the exception rather than the rule these days.

I work for a stodgy old Fortune 500 that has a vaguely seasonal revenue cycle. Past decade, the shareholders have absolutely panicked at a schedule so utterly predictable you can set your watch by it. It causes us to do stupid shiat like locking down all spending during the low quarter to prop things up, despite the fact that doing so causes us to have to rush buying for the high quarters once the results for the bad quarter are out, paying more overall.
 
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