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(Live Science)   In ancient Rome, no rain led to no reign   ( livescience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Roman Empire, Live Science, low rainfall, study lead researcher, lower rainfall, ancient rome, Roman Military Officer, new study  
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3689 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Aug 2018 at 3:20 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-08-09 10:51:56 AM  
Or you could just look at a history book like say, Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and he'll tell you exactly who killed them and why from around 100 AD on.

[Christian] calculated how much it had rained there (in millimeters) every spring for the past 2,500 years. Then, Christian pulled data on military mutinies and emperor assassinations in ancient Rome....From there, "it was really just a question of piecing together these different pieces of information," Christian said

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 11:06:18 AM  
Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.
 
2018-08-09 12:00:06 PM  
Damn you, Bee Girl!
 
2018-08-09 01:57:55 PM  
when you're in doubt and when you're in danger - take a look all around, and I'll be there
 
2018-08-09 03:22:37 PM  
Try this one weird trick to get rid of Roman emperors.
 
2018-08-09 03:24:23 PM  
This is bad news...for Blind Melon
 
2018-08-09 03:24:46 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 03:25:11 PM  
 
2018-08-09 03:26:34 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: Or you could just look at a history book like say, Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and he'll tell you exactly who killed them and why from around 100 AD on.

[Christian] calculated how much it had rained there (in millimeters) every spring for the past 2,500 years. Then, Christian pulled data on military mutinies and emperor assassinations in ancient Rome....From there, "it was really just a question of piecing together these different pieces of information," Christian said

[img.fark.net image 650x311]


Gibbon was about as good a historian as he was a Chinaman - he had a predetermined theory to pound and creatively shoved things around to make them fit.
 
2018-08-09 03:27:03 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 03:27:36 PM  
Milli Vanilli - Blame It On the Rain
Youtube BI5IA8assfk
 
2018-08-09 03:28:16 PM  
images-cdn.9gag.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 03:29:39 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: Or you could just look at a history book like say, Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and he'll tell you exactly who killed them and why from around 100 AD on.

[Christian] calculated how much it had rained there (in millimeters) every spring for the past 2,500 years. Then, Christian pulled data on military mutinies and emperor assassinations in ancient Rome....From there, "it was really just a question of piecing together these different pieces of information," Christian said

[img.fark.net image 650x311]


raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.



This researcher is from one of the absolute worst major universities in Canada.  They are one small step above a diploma mill for international students.
 
2018-08-09 03:30:46 PM  

Dahnkster: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/BI5IA8as​sfk]


B*Witched - Blame It On The Weatherman
Youtube t2UFV2R3EZM
 
2018-08-09 03:32:00 PM  

raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.


But enough about Emperor Commodus!
 
2018-08-09 03:32:01 PM  

dittybopper: johnsoninca: Damn you, Bee Girl!

img.fark.netView Full Size

She growed up nice.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heather_​DeLoach


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 03:32:46 PM  

cowgirl toffee: [images-cdn.9gag.com image 506x598]


The next military unit I have at my disposal is going to do the same thing.
Lets see if those bastages can follow an order.  ANY order.
Alright, attack helicopters, get in the water.  Now FIRE!
 
2018-08-09 03:32:59 PM  
Theories are like opinions...
 
2018-08-09 03:35:35 PM  

stir22: raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.

But enough about Emperor Commodus!


HA!   ;-P
 
2018-08-09 03:36:21 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: Theories are like opinions...


Thy each have eight letters?
 
2018-08-09 03:38:55 PM  

raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought. That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.


I learned on Facebook yesterday that it was because he created August and messed up the decimal calendar system.
 
2018-08-09 03:40:57 PM  
Not sure what all the skepticism is for.  The explanation sounds plausible.  It's a variation on the old "When people are hungry the pitchforks come out" theory.  If he's determined enough of a correlation between the two, it's at least worthy of further investigation (to the extent that that is possible).

Writing the history of events 2000 years ago is never going to result in certainties.  It's like putting together a 2000 piece puzzle with 1700 pieces missing and trying to figure out what the picture is.  There will always be a degree of speculation.  Where the professionalism of the discipline comes in is in having enough background knowledge to put these things into their right context.
 
2018-08-09 03:43:18 PM  

raerae1980: stir22: raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.

But enough about Emperor Commodus!

HA!   ;-P


I had two years of Ancient Rome at college.  Mainly focused on the rise of Rome.  We started way back, and ended the first year's classes around Gaius Marius' fall from power.  We made it to about 100 AD by the end of Year 2.  I never did see how the story ended.
 
2018-08-09 03:45:42 PM  
So Rome wasn't smart enough to feed their soldiers first?

That's like, job 2 for a ruler.
 
2018-08-09 03:49:22 PM  

This text is now purple: So Rome wasn't smart enough to feed their soldiers first?

That's like, job 2 for a ruler.


Egypt was Rome's bread basket, and it's why Rome interfered so much in their affairs.  If the Nile failed to flood as expected, their crops would not grow and, as a result, Romans would starve.
 
2018-08-09 03:50:28 PM  
aungen:I had two years of Ancient Rome at college.  Mainly focused on the rise of Rome.  We started way back, and ended the first year's classes around Gaius Marius' fall from power.  We made it to about 100 AD by the end of Year 2.  I never did see how the story ended.

If you're interested the History of Rome podcast by Mike Duncan is really good and easy to listen to. He manages to go into some detail while not making it dry and boring.
 
2018-08-09 03:51:39 PM  
In ancient society your authority as the ruler derived in part because you were, in essence, a god on Earth.  So if you fail to make it rain and the crops fail, you suck at your job and the populace fires you.  It's all very logical, actually.
 
2018-08-09 03:51:48 PM  
Yeah not sure why this is a weird reason.  There is a reason the phrase bread and circuses came up, hunger and boredom in the populaces are not great for the ruling class.
 
2018-08-09 03:55:12 PM  
This should have been done already. Why hasn't it?

Blind Melon - No Rain
Youtube 3qVPNONdF58
 
2018-08-09 03:56:40 PM  

Dahnkster: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/BI5IA8as​sfk]


So bad they brought down Rome?
 
2018-08-09 03:57:36 PM  

Crewmannumber6: This should have been done already. Why hasn't it?

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/3qVPNONd​F58]


Well, it has been referred to.
 
2018-08-09 03:57:37 PM  

lilplatinum: Yeah not sure why this is a weird reason.  There is a reason the phrase bread and circuses came up, hunger and boredom in the populaces are not great for the ruling class.


Once in a while you just have to raze the cities and start over.
I learned that from Rome: Total War.
And Avengers: Infinity War.
Also - the Roman Empire.
 
2018-08-09 03:59:28 PM  

aungen: lilplatinum: Yeah not sure why this is a weird reason.  There is a reason the phrase bread and circuses came up, hunger and boredom in the populaces are not great for the ruling class.

Once in a while you just have to raze the cities and start over.
I learned that from Rome: Total War.
And Avengers: Infinity War.
Also - the Roman Empire.


Batman Begins, Sim City, Galveston, TX
 
2018-08-09 04:04:55 PM  
I call bullshiat.
 
2018-08-09 04:11:33 PM  

Old Man Winter: I call bullshiat.


It is.
Let's talk about other Roman stuff, like this gorgeous 1,800 gold ring
https://www.livescience.com/63265-anc​i​ent-roman-gold-ring-found.html
 
2018-08-09 04:15:41 PM  

Corydon: Not sure what all the skepticism is for.  The explanation sounds plausible.  It's a variation on the old "When people are hungry the pitchforks come out" theory.  If he's determined enough of a correlation between the two, it's at least worthy of further investigation (to the extent that that is possible).

Writing the history of events 2000 years ago is never going to result in certainties.  It's like putting together a 2000 piece puzzle with 1700 pieces missing and trying to figure out what the picture is.  There will always be a degree of speculation.  Where the professionalism of the discipline comes in is in having enough background knowledge to put these things into their right context.

imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size

Back in the 1980s, an econ professor wrote down the inflation and unemployment numbers during each election and the spread during the election.  It seemed that a low total inflation+unemployment lead to the party (especially the incumbent) winning, while the reverse meant the electorate handed the other party the White House.

This was stood on its head in 2000, and 2004 didn't make any more sense.  Go figure for 2016.

Sure, it matched rainfall and crop growth.  It is always easier to rouse the rabble if things aren't going well.  But it also may have matched sheep entrails that the high priest pulled out or the quality of chariot teams (no joke, this was a huge thing in Constantinople).
 
2018-08-09 04:15:49 PM  

Crewmannumber6: This should have been done already. Why hasn't it?

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/3qVPNONd​F58]


Came for this. Leaving whistling a tune with a jingle in my step ...
 
2018-08-09 04:16:02 PM  

raerae1980: Old Man Winter: I call bullshiat.

It is.
Let's talk about other Roman stuff, like this gorgeous 1,800 gold ring
https://www.livescience.com/63265-anci​ent-roman-gold-ring-found.html


Or this beautiful mural.
 
2018-08-09 04:16:30 PM  

aungen: raerae1980: stir22: raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.

But enough about Emperor Commodus!

HA!   ;-P

I had two years of Ancient Rome at college.  Mainly focused on the rise of Rome.  We started way back, and ended the first year's classes around Gaius Marius' fall from power.  We made it to about 100 AD by the end of Year 2.  I never did see how the story ended.


They fixed the cable.
 
2018-08-09 04:19:32 PM  

HailRobonia: raerae1980: Old Man Winter: I call bullshiat.

It is.
Let's talk about other Roman stuff, like this gorgeous 1,800 gold ring
https://www.livescience.com/63265-anci​ent-roman-gold-ring-found.html

Or this beautiful mural.


You can see that in person if you visit Pompeii.
 
2018-08-09 04:20:09 PM  
so they were only happy when it rains?
 
2018-08-09 04:21:37 PM  

aungen: raerae1980: stir22: raerae1980: Yeah....I'm not sure I buy this theory.   I mean, yeah, of course droughts and other natural disasters affected the ruling classes in antiquity, but that doesn't mean one actually caused the other.
Julius Caesar wasn't assassinated because Egypt was in a drought.  That is just too simplistic of an answer.
It will be interesting to see how this theory is flushed out by other discoveries.

But enough about Emperor Commodus!

HA!   ;-P

I had two years of Ancient Rome at college.  Mainly focused on the rise of Rome.  We started way back, and ended the first year's classes around Gaius Marius' fall from power.  We made it to about 100 AD by the end of Year 2.  I never did see how the story ended.


For the Romans, kinda badly.  For modern Western society, we lucked out.  The Romans were quite the innovators.
 
2018-08-09 04:24:49 PM  

raerae1980: The Romans were quite the innovators.


They were better assimilators than innovators.  Their greek slaves were the scientists.
 
2018-08-09 04:25:29 PM  
Pet Shop Boys - King Of Rome
Youtube fQk6LuHweFg

RIP
 
2018-08-09 04:26:24 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 04:32:11 PM  

lilplatinum: raerae1980: The Romans were quite the innovators.

They were better assimilators than innovators.  Their greek slaves were the scientists.


*tilts head*
They absolutely did incorporate some innovations from the Greeks, but the Greeks didn't invent everything.
Roads, aqueducts, Law codes, concrete, a solid number system (roman numerals), a calendar system, they had the first "newspaper"......I could go on.
 
2018-08-09 04:36:10 PM  

Dead for Tax Reasons: so they were only happy when it rains?


what a load of garbage
 
2018-08-09 04:36:53 PM  

raerae1980: They absolutely did incorporate some innovations from the Greeks, but the Greeks didn't invent everything.
Roads, aqueducts, Law codes, concrete, a solid number system (roman numerals), a calendar system, they had the first "newspaper"......I could go on.


After about 100 AD though they were fairly stagnant as far as technological advancement goes, but then again when you are the big dog I guess it tends to have a 'ain't broke, don't fix it' attitude.
 
2018-08-09 04:38:13 PM  
relatably.comView Full Size
 
2018-08-09 04:45:20 PM  

raerae1980: lilplatinum: raerae1980: The Romans were quite the innovators.

They were better assimilators than innovators.  Their greek slaves were the scientists.

*tilts head*
They absolutely did incorporate some innovations from the Greeks, but the Greeks didn't invent everything.
Roads, aqueducts, Law codes, concrete, a solid number system (roman numerals), a calendar system, they had the first "newspaper"......I could go on.


s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
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