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(Boston.com)   Vermont cheese: the best in the country. Do not read this if you're a fan of individually wrapped cheese food slices   ( boston.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Milk, cheese, cheese makers, Stamp, Vermont cheese road, small cheese board, eclectic cheese counter, Cheese  
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443 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 22 Jul 2018 at 3:16 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-07-22 01:20:53 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-22 01:40:06 PM  
Vermont cheese: the best in the country.

You gouda be kidding me.
 
2018-07-22 01:42:03 PM  
I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.
 
2018-07-22 01:50:34 PM  

DannyBrandt: I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.


Right with you, bubbly.

But, guess what? You can enjoy American semi-dairy cheese product for its distinctive flavor and melting qualities and STILL be capable of appreciating these Vermont cheeses and craft beers.

It's the weirdest thing, like you can like more than one thing at a time. Crazy, right?

/food snobs give me indigestion.
 
2018-07-22 01:53:12 PM  

DannyBrandt: I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.


I have melted a pound of Velveeta into a can of RO-TEL on more than one occasion.
 
2018-07-22 01:53:47 PM  
There are some absolutely breathtaking Vermont cheeses available, but Wisconsin cheeses are really coming into their own these days. I would like to see more American producers focusing on sheep's milk cheeses, from pecorinos to blues. But all in all, I have had excellent product from California to Virginia. Now if only the US consumer could be talked into supporting our artisanal offerings. I realize they cost a lot more--but it's so worth it. Even a tiny $2 piece of a good cheese made with the milk from healthy animals who are roaming around grazing on local vegetation is a million times better than the commercial stuff we mostly have access to in this country. And I'm not a snob about cheese. I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful. It has a sharpness and melts like nothing else and lends itself to everything from being grated onto chili to grilled cheese sandwiches. We could also be developing some incredible queso frescos and Oaxacan style exemplars. I even like "American" cheese and would get a huge kick out of a refined version of that. I love the mozarella you can get in SF and Seattle. And I love the ricotta from small shops in the Boston-to-Philadelphia corridor. And then there's fresh paneer. I found some amazing cow's milk and goat's milk cheese in NC. Some of it tasted like clover and meadows. It was like the end of summer dancing on your tongue. I just got a block of domestic cheddar for a souffle for like $6/lb that had just that right amount of acidity and bite. Sharp but still creamy. It would be nice if we could come up with a parmesan like they do in Argentina. If we could have a distributor and cheerleader like Neal's Yard Dairy, we could probably take over the world one piece of cheese at a time...

Whatever. Cheese is good.
 
2018-07-22 01:55:01 PM  
Yeah, well, our cows are happier
 
2018-07-22 01:55:20 PM  
The best US cheddar I've had was 15 years old from Wisconsin.  You have to go to Vermont in the early fall to get the good cheese (winter they're snowed in, spring is too muddy, and summer has biting insects).
 
2018-07-22 02:06:54 PM  
"American" cheese tastes like coating your tongue in wax. Real cheese from Vermont and Wisconsin, now that's the good stuff.
 
2018-07-22 02:11:40 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: DannyBrandt: I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.

I have melted a pound of Velveeta into a can of RO-TEL on more than one occasion.


Break up some Jimmy Dean's breakfast sausage and cook it up.

Add that to your velveta and ro-tel.

Best dip ever.
 
2018-07-22 02:15:32 PM  
Wisconsin cheese curds, when still warm and squeaky fresh, are better than anything else.
 
2018-07-22 03:08:10 PM  
 
2018-07-22 03:19:44 PM  

ginandbacon: There are some absolutely breathtaking Vermont cheeses available, but Wisconsin cheeses are really coming into their own these days. I would like to see more American producers focusing on sheep's milk cheeses, from pecorinos to blues. But all in all, I have had excellent product from California to Virginia. Now if only the US consumer could be talked into supporting our artisanal offerings. I realize they cost a lot more--but it's so worth it. Even a tiny $2 piece of a good cheese made with the milk from healthy animals who are roaming around grazing on local vegetation is a million times better than the commercial stuff we mostly have access to in this country. And I'm not a snob about cheese. I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful. It has a sharpness and melts like nothing else and lends itself to everything from being grated onto chili to grilled cheese sandwiches. We could also be developing some incredible queso frescos and Oaxacan style exemplars. I even like "American" cheese and would get a huge kick out of a refined version of that. I love the mozarella you can get in SF and Seattle. And I love the ricotta from small shops in the Boston-to-Philadelphia corridor. And then there's fresh paneer. I found some amazing cow's milk and goat's milk cheese in NC. Some of it tasted like clover and meadows. It was like the end of summer dancing on your tongue. I just got a block of domestic cheddar for a souffle for like $6/lb that had just that right amount of acidity and bite. Sharp but still creamy. It would be nice if we could come up with a parmesan like they do in Argentina. If we could have a distributor and cheerleader like Neal's Yard Dairy, we could probably take over the world one piece of cheese at a time...

Whatever. Cheese is good.


I just had a small Wisconsin meats and cheeses store open less than two miles from my house. The gods are smiling.
 
2018-07-22 03:23:47 PM  

holdmybones: ginandbacon: There are some absolutely breathtaking Vermont cheeses available, but Wisconsin cheeses are really coming into their own these days. I would like to see more American producers focusing on sheep's milk cheeses, from pecorinos to blues. But all in all, I have had excellent product from California to Virginia. Now if only the US consumer could be talked into supporting our artisanal offerings. I realize they cost a lot more--but it's so worth it. Even a tiny $2 piece of a good cheese made with the milk from healthy animals who are roaming around grazing on local vegetation is a million times better than the commercial stuff we mostly have access to in this country. And I'm not a snob about cheese. I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful. It has a sharpness and melts like nothing else and lends itself to everything from being grated onto chili to grilled cheese sandwiches. We could also be developing some incredible queso frescos and Oaxacan style exemplars. I even like "American" cheese and would get a huge kick out of a refined version of that. I love the mozarella you can get in SF and Seattle. And I love the ricotta from small shops in the Boston-to-Philadelphia corridor. And then there's fresh paneer. I found some amazing cow's milk and goat's milk cheese in NC. Some of it tasted like clover and meadows. It was like the end of summer dancing on your tongue. I just got a block of domestic cheddar for a souffle for like $6/lb that had just that right amount of acidity and bite. Sharp but still creamy. It would be nice if we could come up with a parmesan like they do in Argentina. If we could have a distributor and cheerleader like Neal's Yard Dairy, we could probably take over the world one piece of cheese at a time...

Whatever. Cheese is good.

I just had a small Wisconsin meats and cheeses store open less than two miles from my house. The gods are smiling.


So jealous.
 
2018-07-22 03:29:51 PM  
I'm a cheese snob.

But I'll be damned if a Kraft Single doesn't taste pretty damn perfect on a hamburger. Or in a grilled cheese.

Is it nostalgia? Maybe, but I don't think so. Of course, in my opinion, American cheese tastes like crap if you are using for anything besides those 2 things.

My theory is that American cheese demands to be paired HEAVY "umami" flavors to taste good. But then it tastes great.
 
2018-07-22 03:30:24 PM  
There are some really good made-in-Oregon cheeses too.

images-nitrosell-com.akamaized.netView Full Size


One of my favorites
 
2018-07-22 03:30:26 PM  
Someone actually read this and interpreted it as "Vermont cheese is the best in the country?!"

It was a cheesemonger competition. It had nothing to do with the quality of the cheese, but with the quality of the people involved with it.

This is akin to having a Polish mechanic win a NAPA competition, then exclaiming that Polish automobiles are the best in the world. WTH, Fark?
 
2018-07-22 03:32:17 PM  
Egg thread, cheese thread... So what cheese pairs best with eggs? I like an extra-sharp cheddar on scrambled eggs, myself.
 
2018-07-22 03:39:55 PM  

forteblast: "American" cheese tastes like coating your tongue in wax. Real cheese from Vermont and Wisconsin, now that's the good stuff.


And Colorado, Illinois, and California, too. 8 of the 66 world's best cheeses come from the United States. Here they are, in alpha order:
- Cremont - Vermont Creamery (Vermont)
- Gold Hill - Haystack Mountain Goat Dairy (Colorado)
- Kiss My Ash - Saputo Cheese (Illinois)
- Little Hosmer - Cellars at Jasper Hill (Vermont)
- Point Reyes Bay Blue - Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company (California)
- Sartori Reserve BellaVitano Gold - Sartori Cheese (Wisconsin)
- Sartori Reserve SarVecchio - Sartori Cheese (Wisconsin)
- Shepherds Blind - Carr Valley Cheese Co., Inc. (Wisconsin)
 
2018-07-22 03:40:49 PM  
And I loves me some Point Reyes - that blue is marvelous, and easily obtained out here.
 
2018-07-22 04:08:57 PM  

DannyBrandt: Marcus Aurelius: DannyBrandt: I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.

I have melted a pound of Velveeta into a can of RO-TEL on more than one occasion.

Break up some Jimmy Dean's breakfast sausage chorizo and cook it up.

Add that to your velveta and ro-tel.

Best dip ever.

 
2018-07-22 04:50:02 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-22 04:53:08 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: The best US cheddar I've had was 15 years old from Wisconsin.  You have to go to Vermont in the early fall to get the good cheese (winter they're snowed in, spring is too muddy, and summer has biting insects).


I regularly get a 7 year old cheddar from a small place in NW North Carolina.  I can't imagine what something twice that age would taste like.
 
2018-07-22 05:10:59 PM  
Wish I had more local cheeses here, but Kerrygold Reserve, which is/was available at Costco is real good. It's like a mix of Cheddar and Parmagiano Reggiano.
 
2018-07-22 05:26:45 PM  

COMALite J: DannyBrandt: Marcus Aurelius: DannyBrandt: I think crappy American cheese is like hot dogs. As an adult, you know that stuff is nasty, you know better.

But you grew up with it, loved it as a kid.

So it gets grandfathered in. Hell, I still eat hot dogs and I'll put "cheese product" on a burger. Don't judge me.

I have melted a pound of Velveeta into a can of RO-TEL on more than one occasion.

Break up some Jimmy Dean's breakfast sausage chorizo and cook it up.

Add that to your velveta and ro-tel.

Best dip ever.


I make it with seasoned ground beef.
 
2018-07-22 05:40:48 PM  
Not to get all advertisementy

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-22 06:02:11 PM  
Had some very good Vermont taleggio-like cheese made by the von Trapp family not that long ago.
 
2018-07-22 06:29:09 PM  

ginandbacon: I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful.


Here you go - Deer Creek's The Robin

holdmybones: I just had a small Wisconsin meats and cheeses store open less than two miles from my house. The gods are smiling.


Try the Marieke Fenugreek Gouda

FormlessOne: And I loves me some Point Reyes - that blue is marvelous, and easily obtained out here.


You can find that in Wisconsin, but for some reason no one 'imports' Dry Jack here from CA. Rumiano makes a great one and I can only get it when my employer sends me to the factory in Crescent City.
 
2018-07-22 06:42:46 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: The best US cheddar I've had was 15 years old from Wisconsin.  You have to go to Vermont in the early fall to get the good cheese (winter they're snowed in, spring is too muddy, and summer has biting insects).


It's fun year round here. Our weather is never boring.

Best cheddar:

img.fark.netView Full Size



Best cheddar accompaniment:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-22 06:44:39 PM  

phaseolus: ginandbacon: I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful.


Here you go - Deer Creek's The Robin


OMG that looks absolutely beautiful! Thank you!!!!!!
 
2018-07-22 07:31:06 PM  

forteblast: "American" cheese tastes like coating your tongue in wax.


Dollar store cheese .
 
2018-07-22 07:40:02 PM  

phaseolus: ginandbacon: I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful.

Here you go - Deer Creek's The Robin

holdmybones: I just had a small Wisconsin meats and cheeses store open less than two miles from my house. The gods are smiling.

Try the Marieke Fenugreek Gouda

FormlessOne: And I loves me some Point Reyes - that blue is marvelous, and easily obtained out here.

You can find that in Wisconsin, but for some reason no one 'imports' Dry Jack here from CA. Rumiano makes a great one and I can only get it when my employer sends me to the factory in Crescent City.


I jotted that down. Will look for it this week.
 
2018-07-22 07:44:48 PM  

holdmybones: phaseolus: ginandbacon: I would love to see a quality longhorn for example. It's a truly American product and it's delightful.

Here you go - Deer Creek's The Robin

holdmybones: I just had a small Wisconsin meats and cheeses store open less than two miles from my house. The gods are smiling.

Try the Marieke Fenugreek Gouda

FormlessOne: And I loves me some Point Reyes - that blue is marvelous, and easily obtained out here.

You can find that in Wisconsin, but for some reason no one 'imports' Dry Jack here from CA. Rumiano makes a great one and I can only get it when my employer sends me to the factory in Crescent City.

I jotted that down. Will look for it this week.


Also taking notes...
 
2018-07-22 08:08:53 PM  
Anyone tried to make a grilled cheese PB&J?  No?  Hint.  The jelly will turn into a liquid, making a mess.  Take 2 slices of bread, spread peanut butter over one.  Pop onto your cooking surface, putting the cheese over the peanut butter and the second slice of bread over that.  Cook, flip, cook, enjoy.
 
2018-07-22 08:27:24 PM  
My wife likes my dick cheese.

Not really, but she won't read this.
 
2018-07-22 08:27:54 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: The best US cheddar I've had was 15 years old from Wisconsin.  You have to go to Vermont in the early fall to get the good cheese (winter they're snowed in, spring is too muddy, and summer has biting insects).


Snowed in?  That's absurd.  That's what the snowshoes are for.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-22 08:34:19 PM  
I'm not letting someone from Vermont shame me about my appreariation for plastic cheese
 
2018-07-22 10:16:27 PM  
OK, I've only had one cheese that I didn't like.  It was a Swiss product that was walnut brown, waxy, and tasted like caramelized goat.  I do like goat.  The person that served it to me did not know the name of it.

On the other hand, a pound of taco-seasoned ground beef with a can of Ro-Tel and a pound of Velveeta melted and served with corn chips is sublime.

Stilton, Limburger, etc.  Bring it on!
 
2018-07-22 11:28:38 PM  
I will need more samples before I can definitively say whether Vermont cheese is better than cheese made in Wisconsin.  (burp)
 
2018-07-22 11:32:25 PM  

lather: OK, I've only had one cheese that I didn't like. It was a Swiss product that was walnut brown, waxy, and tasted like caramelized goat. I do like goat. The person that served it to me did not know the name of it.


Not Gjetost?
img.fark.netView Full Size

I thought that was Norwegian.
 
2018-07-23 12:24:32 AM  

flondrix: lather: OK, I've only had one cheese that I didn't like. It was a Swiss product that was walnut brown, waxy, and tasted like caramelized goat. I do like goat. The person that served it to me did not know the name of it.

Not Gjetost?
[img.fark.net image 715x477]
I thought that was Norwegian.


I made a nice parmesan today, and was planning to make Gjetost with the whey, but just didn't feel up to sitting in front of the cheesepot for another five hours in this heat.
Spread on homemade seedy crackers, Gjetost is one of my favorite foods.
 
2018-07-23 12:44:28 AM  
Mmmm, I love me some cheese out of a can.


I'm referring, of course, to Cougar Gold from Washington State University.  Don't forget to buy two tins: one to eat now and one to let sit for a couple of years growing crystals.
 
2018-07-23 01:00:12 AM  

lather: OK, I've only had one cheese that I didn't like.  It was a Swiss product that was walnut brown, waxy, and tasted like caramelized goat.  I do like goat.  The person that served it to me did not know the name of it.

On the other hand, a pound of taco-seasoned ground beef with a can of Ro-Tel and a pound of Velveeta melted and served with corn chips is sublime.

Stilton, Limburger, etc.  Bring it on!


I bought a chunk of tilsit one time, and it was pretty good. Definite aroma, but nothing too offensive. Then I decided to make a toasted cheese sandwich with it. The smell from the cooking cheese had such an overpoweringly gross, ripe, foot- fungusy smell that I couldn't bring myself to eat it. And it took forever for that smell to clear out of the apartment. My roommate was not happy.
 
2018-07-23 03:47:36 AM  
Vermont cheese gets it's funk fromunda teddy-bears.
 
2018-07-23 05:38:03 AM  
Photo taken just now at the Burlington (Vermont) airport:

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-23 08:30:38 AM  

turbidette: Spread on homemade seedy crackers


img.fark.netView Full Size


Well, I guess it takes all kinds, but I wouldn't spread cheese on them if you paid me.
 
2018-07-23 08:46:43 AM  

turbidette: Spread on homemade seedy crackers, Gjetost is one of my favorite foods.


"Spread"?  I don't think we're talking about the same cheese.  The Gjetost I have encountered, although not quite a "hard" cheese, is so stiff that you have to shave it with one of those cheese shaver things if you want it thin (which you do).
 
2018-07-23 10:09:30 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: The best US cheddar I've had was 15 years old from Wisconsin.  You have to go to Vermont in the early fall to get the good cheese (winter they're snowed in, spring is too muddy, and summer has biting insects).


Did you buy it at the castle?
roadsideamerica.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-23 11:24:29 AM  

flondrix: turbidette: Spread on homemade seedy crackers, Gjetost is one of my favorite foods.

"Spread"?  I don't think we're talking about the same cheese.  The Gjetost I have encountered, although not quite a "hard" cheese, is so stiff that you have to shave it with one of those cheese shaver things if you want it thin (which you do).


The homemade version doesn't have all the same crap in it that much of the commercially made Gjetost does.  Think of the difference between homemade yogurt made with milk and bacteria cultures versus the stuff from the store with dry milk, gelatin, guar gum, etc added to thicken it up.
Homemade (traditional) Gjetost is kind of crumbly and stiff.  You can form it into shapes and it will hold, but I generally pour the freshly made molten cheese into a wide shallow jar.  I scoop it out to serve it. It's too crumbly to slice (except thickly) and too stiff to spread easily.  I'm having trouble thinking of any other food with the same consistency.
The flavor is nutty, and caramelly, and tangy.  It's amazing, and I don't know why it's so hard to find in the US.
 
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