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(Phys Org2)   Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years, then leave Subway to do some more excavating   ( phys.org) divider line
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1096 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jul 2018 at 6:00 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-07-17 02:49:25 AM  
It's pizza. Invented bc they wanted something to go with the beer
 
2018-07-17 06:12:00 AM  
a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago.

I should not have ordered take out with my Zoom modem.
 
2018-07-17 07:17:49 AM  
"The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period."

This actually makes a lot of sense. You'd better have a use case for something before you start production.
 
2018-07-17 07:23:53 AM  
why did they leave the subway? did a rat take the slice of pizza?
 
2018-07-17 07:28:47 AM  
So agriculture was only discovered around 2000 years ago?

/Must be if the earth is only 6000 years old
//US people tell me so
 
2018-07-17 07:33:00 AM  
Wow, were they eating meat before commercial farming? I am amazed. This is non news idiocy. the only thing remotely news worthy is the age. They found bread that's older than the oldest previous bread,
 
2018-07-17 07:36:01 AM  
The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.
 
2018-07-17 07:41:44 AM  
HOTY candidate. Well played.
 
2018-07-17 07:55:51 AM  
How does one become an expert on prehistoric bread?
 
2018-07-17 08:03:33 AM  
So bread is paleo now.
 
2018-07-17 08:04:22 AM  

ihateallofyou: How does one become an expert on prehistoric bread?


First, get a shovel...
 
2018-07-17 08:06:04 AM  

DerAppie: "The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period."

This actually makes a lot of sense. You'd better have a use case for something before you start production.


Dry unleavened bread can be stored for a long time, like crackers, so using grains to make ready-to-eat food that could be stored would be an incentive to start cultivating grain, instead of just gathering and eating as you go.
 
2018-07-17 08:13:41 AM  
It's the next best thing to sliced bread but I suppose they hadn't discovered that yet.
 
2018-07-17 08:13:59 AM  
Does this mean my friend with the paleo diet while finally shut up?
 
2018-07-17 08:22:56 AM  
Still not acceptable for the Atkins diet.
 
2018-07-17 08:26:45 AM  

lucksi: So agriculture was only discovered around 2000 years ago?

/Must be if the earth is only 6000 years old
//US people tell me so


platform.globig.coView Full Size
 
2018-07-17 08:28:23 AM  
Bullshiat, not sustained by established Biblical Science.
 
2018-07-17 08:37:01 AM  
I prefer to believe that cereal grains were domesticated to brew beer. Not because it necessarily makes more sense, I just really like beer.
 
2018-07-17 08:51:00 AM  

Bslim: Bullshiat, not sustained by established Biblical Science.


I have it on good authority that people were trading rocks, one hundred million years ago, people are saying, I don't know.
 
2018-07-17 08:57:48 AM  
I found a rather interesting read about the biscuit. Specifically, how it evolved from the shipss biscuit, briefly was a scone, then turned into what we think of a biscuit today.

But, my true passion is flat bread.
 
2018-07-17 09:18:40 AM  

Voiceofreason01: I prefer to believe that cereal grains were domesticated to brew beer. Not because it necessarily makes more sense, I just really like beer.


Well of course! Any fool can eat them but the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.

/praise to the maker and glory to His bounty
//for learning about....beer!
___ <- slashies hadd too much beer to stand up straight
 
2018-07-17 09:37:35 AM  
The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

I'll tell you what the findings suggest. That hunter-gatherers kept a messy cookplace and let grains fall to a ground that was rich with ash from fires. Agriculture shmagriculture. These people didn't have decent cookware.
 
2018-07-17 09:38:17 AM  

lando12310: Wow, were they eating meat before commercial farming? I am amazed. This is non news idiocy. the only thing remotely news worthy is the age. They found bread that's older than the oldest previous bread,


That's the point of the whole article dumbass
 
2018-07-17 09:44:15 AM  

a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.


Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!
 
2018-07-17 09:46:10 AM  

Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!


Hardtack, which is essentially what they were making if they were using ground up grain and water, can last nearly forever.
 
2018-07-17 09:54:12 AM  

Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!


Lembas lasts almost forever , if you leave it in its leaf wrappers.
 
2018-07-17 10:45:38 AM  

a_room_with_a_moose: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Lembas lasts almost forever , if you leave it in its leaf wrappers.


Same with dwarf bread, but that's because everyone suddenly finds something, anything they'd rather eat than dwarf bread.
 
2018-07-17 10:59:10 AM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Hardtack, which is essentially what they were making if they were using ground up grain and water, can last nearly forever.


Because no one wants to eat it.

Unlike fluffy, sweet-smelling yeast bread.
 
2018-07-17 11:00:17 AM  
Stuff keeps getting older.

Gobekli Tepe was covered up and lost for the ages about 1 thousand years or so after this.

Probably should start looking for that comet that slammed into North America 12600 years ago that set the world back a few years.
 
2018-07-17 11:03:31 AM  

Mitch Mitchell: a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago.

I should not have ordered take out with my Zoom modem.


Clever
 
2018-07-17 11:10:21 AM  

mrparks: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Hardtack, which is essentially what they were making if they were using ground up grain and water, can last nearly forever.

Because no one wants to eat it.

Unlike fluffy, sweet-smelling yeast bread.


No argument here. I've been known to make bannock in my toaster oven. I've purchased stainless steel pans that I bake the stuff with. About 30 minutes from start to finish I get a nice, warm, sweet, raisin and nut-filled bread. No yeast but still a nice rise.
 
2018-07-17 11:27:29 AM  

meat0918: So bread is paleo now.


I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.
 
2018-07-17 11:38:35 AM  

adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.

I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.


was it a video sponsored by Kellogg's and Monsanto?  because studies of hunter-gatherer diets looks pretty damn Ancestral/Primal/Paleo: Hunter Gatherer Diets.  Also see diets of the Maasai and Kitavans
 
2018-07-17 11:51:12 AM  

ihateallofyou: How does one become an expert on prehistoric bread?


practice.
 
2018-07-17 12:39:24 PM  

JolobinSmokin: Stuff keeps getting older.

Gobekli Tepe was covered up and lost for the ages about 1 thousand years or so after this.

Probably should start looking for that comet that slammed into North America 12600 years ago that set the world back a few years.


This is the same region as Gobekli and there are un-excavated parts fo the complex that may be older than this cred (14,000 BC).  I am sure in the next few decades we're gonna find hard evidence fo "civilizations" that old as well and realzes that history didn;t start in the Fertile Crescent but Started OVER after the main coastal cities were wiped out by the melting glacier sheets
 
2018-07-17 12:54:04 PM  

DerAppie: "The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period."

This actually makes a lot of sense. You'd better have a use case for something before you start production.


There really are only two possibilities: either they discovered beer first, domesticated the grains for beer, and only then discovered bread or they discovered bread before domesticating grains (and beer only helps to encourage farming/sticking around the keg).

Bread predating farming seems obvious, so I hope this is more about how the evidence confirms the obvious (sometimes people absolutely refuse to do what's obvious in hindsight and do things the hard way).
 
2018-07-17 01:01:14 PM  

NakedDrummer: adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.

I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.

was it a video sponsored by Kellogg's and Monsanto?  because studies of hunter-gatherer diets looks pretty damn Ancestral/Primal/Paleo: Hunter Gatherer Diets.  Also see diets of the Maasai and Kitavans


Yeah, about Paleo.

It's just low carb dieting cosplaying as a caveman.
 
2018-07-17 01:22:29 PM  

meat0918: NakedDrummer: adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.

I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.

was it a video sponsored by Kellogg's and Monsanto?  because studies of hunter-gatherer diets looks pretty damn Ancestral/Primal/Paleo: Hunter Gatherer Diets.  Also see diets of the Maasai and Kitavans

Yeah, about Paleo.

It's just low carb dieting cosplaying as a caveman.


Ancestral diets aren't necessarily low carb.  I guess the original Cordain version of paleo emphasized lean meats and was lower in carbs.  Primal Blueprint is a much better version of ancestral diets and includes tubers, sweet potatoes, fruits, full fat dairy and meats, etc.  Certainly not low carb or ketogenic in it's backbone, though can be adapted for it rather readily.

You link didn't really provide anything interesting and the author doesn't seem to know anything about ancestral diets nor bothered to do any real research.   just some whargarble about Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies.. but that's not core ancestral diet plans, just companies jumping on trends to make some bucks, like, ya know, everything else out there.
 
2018-07-17 01:25:59 PM  

Bondith: a_room_with_a_moose: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Lembas lasts almost forever , if you leave it in its leaf wrappers.

Same with dwarf bread, but that's because everyone suddenly finds something, anything they'd rather eat than dwarf bread.


Dwarven battle bread makes for a great club though!
 
2018-07-17 01:28:51 PM  

NakedDrummer: meat0918: NakedDrummer: adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.

I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.

was it a video sponsored by Kellogg's and Monsanto?  because studies of hunter-gatherer diets looks pretty damn Ancestral/Primal/Paleo: Hunter Gatherer Diets.  Also see diets of the Maasai and Kitavans

Yeah, about Paleo.

It's just low carb dieting cosplaying as a caveman.

Ancestral diets aren't necessarily low carb.  I guess the original Cordain version of paleo emphasized lean meats and was lower in carbs.  Primal Blueprint is a much better version of ancestral diets and includes tubers, sweet potatoes, fruits, full fat dairy and meats, etc.  Certainly not low carb or ketogenic in it's backbone, though can be adapted for it rather readily.

You link didn't really provide anything interesting and the author doesn't seem to know anything about ancestral diets nor bothered to do any real research.   just some whargarble about Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies.. but that's not core ancestral diet plans, just companies jumping on trends to make some bucks, like, ya know, everything else out there.


So you're saying cavemen didn't have chocolate chip cookies? My entire life has been a lie!
 
2018-07-17 02:18:47 PM  

Telos: Dwarven battle bread makes for a great club though!


Just like mom used to hammer out on her anvil.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-17 02:53:07 PM  

Telos: Bondith: a_room_with_a_moose: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Lembas lasts almost forever , if you leave it in its leaf wrappers.

Same with dwarf bread, but that's because everyone suddenly finds something, anything they'd rather eat than dwarf bread.

Dwarven battle bread makes for a great club though!


A club of Dwarven battle bread enthusiasts would have about 8 teeth between them.
 
2018-07-17 03:02:46 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: DerAppie: "The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period."

This actually makes a lot of sense. You'd better have a use case for something before you start production.

There really are only two possibilities: either they discovered beer first, domesticated the grains for beer, and only then discovered bread or they discovered bread before domesticating grains (and beer only helps to encourage farming/sticking around the keg).

Bread predating farming seems obvious, so I hope this is more about how the evidence confirms the obvious (sometimes people absolutely refuse to do what's obvious in hindsight and do things the hard way).


Beer was an also-ran to Mead which was likely the first alcoholic drink humans partook of.   All it took was stumbling across an abandoned beehive after it had rained for a bit annnnd. bingo!
 
2018-07-17 03:13:50 PM  

NakedDrummer: meat0918: NakedDrummer: adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.

I saw a video that debunked the Paleo diet thoroughly based on hunter-gatherer diets and evidence of ancient diets. The diet may have some value, but the reasoning behind the diet and the name are pure ignorance.

was it a video sponsored by Kellogg's and Monsanto?  because studies of hunter-gatherer diets looks pretty damn Ancestral/Primal/Paleo: Hunter Gatherer Diets.  Also see diets of the Maasai and Kitavans

Yeah, about Paleo.

It's just low carb dieting cosplaying as a caveman.

Ancestral diets aren't necessarily low carb.  I guess the original Cordain version of paleo emphasized lean meats and was lower in carbs.  Primal Blueprint is a much better version of ancestral diets and includes tubers, sweet potatoes, fruits, full fat dairy and meats, etc.  Certainly not low carb or ketogenic in it's backbone, though can be adapted for it rather readily.

You link didn't really provide anything interesting and the author doesn't seem to know anything about ancestral diets nor bothered to do any real research.   just some whargarble about Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies.. but that's not core ancestral diet plans, just companies jumping on trends to make some bucks, like, ya know, everything else out there.


For all the Psuedo-scientifc nonsense about "Paleo" diets, they are based on one salient fact:  Until agriculture, Carbohydrates were not the main source of nutrition for most humans, and we evolved to match that.    Thus carbs (which are most abundant in the late summer and fall) trigger insulin to digest, and insulin triggers a cascade of microhormones called eicosaniods that effect the size of your airways, your BP, and of most interest to dieters, the switch that tells the body to store excess calories as fat or to burn fat for fuel. Insulin triggers the hormons that turns the switch to the "make fat" position.  Which kinda makes sense because late summer and fall is when you want to be storing excess fuel for the leaner winter months ahead.    Insulin's opposite number, Glucagon turns on the opposite microhormone set, and when your blood sugar is low, Gulcagon is produced to raise it, which then makes you burn fat for fuel  by the process of ketosis.   (particularly if there aren;t ready card available to become sugar)   Again this makes evolutionary sense for the carb-less winter months.


Even the oldest dates for agriculture are a blip on the evolutionary time scale, so while some people can tolerate them and have evolved the necessary guy bacteria etc to do okay on a carb-rich diet, many people, particularly those descended from nomadic peoples. still don;t do well with a carb heavy diet, and exp[experience rapid weight loss when they take steps to largely exclude them from their diet (150 lb personally 100 in 3 months-with zero caloric restrictions, or significant exercise...just kept carbs under 40)
 
2018-07-17 03:39:43 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: mrparks: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Telos: a_room_with_a_moose: The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

This was the accepted theory when I was in college (cough) thirty (cough) years ago. Breads are travel foods - the loaf, once made, needs no additional preparation and can keep for long periods of time.

But it's always nice to see supporting evidence.

Define long periods of time... I'm lucky if a loaf lasts a week before getting moldy!

Hardtack, which is essentially what they were making if they were using ground up grain and water, can last nearly forever.

Because no one wants to eat it.

Unlike fluffy, sweet-smelling yeast bread.

No argument here. I've been known to make bannock in my toaster oven. I've purchased stainless steel pans that I bake the stuff with. About 30 minutes from start to finish I get a nice, warm, sweet, raisin and nut-filled bread. No yeast but still a nice rise.


Recipe?
 
2018-07-17 03:53:42 PM  

Magorn: Beer was an also-ran to Mead which was likely the first alcoholic drink humans partook of.   All it took was stumbling across an abandoned beehive after it had rained for a bit annnnd. bingo!


Or wine.

Hell, birds get sauced on fermented berries. There's literally zero prep needed.
 
2018-07-17 04:00:30 PM  

Magorn: For all the Psuedo-scientifc nonsense about "Paleo" diets, they are based on one salient fact:  Until agriculture, Carbohydrates were not the main source of nutrition for most humans, and we evolved to match that.    Thus carbs (which are most abundant in the late summer and fall) trigger insulin to digest, and insulin triggers a cascade of microhormones called eicosaniods that effect the size of your airways, your BP, and of most interest to dieters, the switch that tells the body to store excess calories as fat or to burn fat for fuel. Insulin triggers the hormons that turns the switch to the "make fat" position.  Which kinda makes sense because late summer and fall is when you want to be storing excess fuel for the leaner winter months ahead.    Insulin's opposite number, Glucagon turns on the opposite microhormone set, and when your blood sugar is low, Gulcagon is produced to raise it, which then makes you burn fat for fuel  by the process of ketosis.   (particularly if there aren;t ready card available to become sugar)   Again this makes evolutionary sense for the carb-less winter months.


Humans originated in equatorial Africa. There was little reason for a summer-winter distinction.
 
2018-07-17 04:02:51 PM  

Magorn: NakedDrummer: meat0918: NakedDrummer: adamatari: meat0918: So bread is paleo now.
For all the Psuedo-scientifc nonsense about "Paleo" diets, they are based on one salient fact:  Until agriculture, Carbohydrates were not the main source of nutrition for most humans, and we evolved to match


For those of us who aren't lactose intolerant, we have evolved (in at least some ways) to eat a post "Paleo" diet and even more of that nonsense.  There's no reason to believe that this is the only one, and that there are plenty of post paleo genes flying around (alcohol intolerance is another famous one that presumably had a clear effect in neolithic times and later.

Magorn: yet_another_wumpus: DerAppie: "The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period."
[...]
Beer was an also-ran to Mead which was likely the first alcoholic drink humans partook of.   All it took was stumbling across an abandoned beehive after it had rained for a bit annnnd. bingo!


Still, you would need to discover mead, discover how to produce mead at will (rainy mead must be nasty.  Even if you got there before the bears, squirrels, birds, etc you didn't get there before the bacteria, although they might have issues with honey), then realize you can do the same trick with grain (I'd guess you would discover wine first, but I think grape cultivation came much later), then cultivate the grain.

There were a lot of tough neolithic jobs, but I suspect neolithic bee keeper was pretty bad.
 
2018-07-17 04:16:53 PM  

Thosw: ihateallofyou: How does one become an expert on prehistoric bread?

First, get a shovel...


Step two: drink alcohol

A lot.
 
2018-07-17 04:49:05 PM  

This text is now purple: Magorn: For all the Psuedo-scientifc nonsense about "Paleo" diets, they are based on one salient fact:  Until agriculture, Carbohydrates were not the main source of nutrition for most humans, and we evolved to match that.    Thus carbs (which are most abundant in the late summer and fall) trigger insulin to digest, and insulin triggers a cascade of microhormones called eicosaniods that effect the size of your airways, your BP, and of most interest to dieters, the switch that tells the body to store excess calories as fat or to burn fat for fuel. Insulin triggers the hormons that turns the switch to the "make fat" position.  Which kinda makes sense because late summer and fall is when you want to be storing excess fuel for the leaner winter months ahead.    Insulin's opposite number, Glucagon turns on the opposite microhormone set, and when your blood sugar is low, Gulcagon is produced to raise it, which then makes you burn fat for fuel  by the process of ketosis.   (particularly if there aren;t ready card available to become sugar)   Again this makes evolutionary sense for the carb-less winter months.

Humans originated in equatorial Africa. There was little reason for a summer-winter distinction.


A quick google for equatorial African seasons..
There are three seasons in Ethiopia; from September to February is the long dry season known as the bega; this is followed by a short rainy season, the belg, in March and April. May is a hot and dry month preceding the long rainy season (kremt) in June, July, and August.

or from the other coast..
Equatorial Guinea has a tropical climate with distinct wet and dry seasons. From June to August, Río Muni is dry and Bioko wet; from December to February, the reverse obtains. In between there is gradual transition

wet-dry seasons have plenty of affect on animal migrations and plant production
 
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