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(LA Times)   I have an idea, let's incorrectly install an electric fence in a wildfire area. What could go wrong?   ( latimes.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, San Francisco Bay Area, electric livestock fence, California, spokesman Scott McLean, Yolo County district, eerie yellow haze, Napa County, California, National Weather Service  
•       •       •

6445 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Jul 2018 at 3:05 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-07-12 02:25:25 PM  
Well that made me wonder so... https://www.ibiblio.org/farming​-connec​tion/grazing/features/fencemis.htm

"So you won't have to learn the hard way, here are 17 common mistakes that you should avoid:

Poor earth grounding. Lots of folks (including me) still think you can skimp when it comes to adequate earth grounding. What we must all learn to do, is install several ground rods -- at least three that are 6 to 8 feet long, galvanized, and attached with good ground clamps. The electricity must complete a full circle back to the charger through the ground. Poor grounding gives weak shocks.

Using different types of metals. Don't do it. When you hook up steel wire to copper something call electrolysis happens and the metal becomes corroded, making a poor contact and weakening shocking power.

Inadequate animal training. Each and every animal must learn that the fence hurts. So please build a handy training fence, preferably on heavy wet soil. Flag the fence for visibility, and force the animal to try and cross the fence.

Fenceposts too close together. Well-intended government agencies recommend lots of fenceposts in their fencing specifications. Fifty-foot spacing on flat land is just too close. You want the fence to act like a rubber band. When something runs into the wire, you don't want to break all the insulators or knock posts out of the ground. If the posts are spread apart far enough -- say 80 to 100 feet -- the wire will just bend to the ground and pop back up.

Too many wire tie-offs. Again, fencing specifications may call for braces every quarter mile wire to tie the wire off. But I have found that even 5,000 feet is OK, and actually adds more elasticity in the fence wire. This reduces the chance of wires breaking.

Wires tied tight to each fencepost. To maintain elasticity (the rubber band effect), wires must float past each line fencepost.
"
Building new fences near old existing fences. Old fence wires seem to be always moving somewhere and coming in contact with the new electrified wires. This almost always causes a complete short in the fence, and away the animals go.

Bottom wire in contact with heavy, wet vegetation. Wet grass will suck lots of juice out of any fence charger. Hook up the lower wires separate from the other wires, and install a switch for the lower wires that you can turn them off when the grass is tall.

Poor-quality insulators. Be careful here. Sunlight deteriorates plastic. So buy good-quality, long-lasting insulators. Usually black ones are treated to resist degradation by ultraviolet light. I have found that poor quality insulators turn white or clear after a few years in direct sunlight.

Staples driven in all the way. When using plastic tubing as an insulator, don't staple it too tight. I once spent several hours trying to find a short in a gate. Finally, I discovered a staple had damaged the tubing next to a ground wire, causing a hidden short.

Solar panels not directly facing the sun. This seems almost too obvious to be a problem. But a solar panel won't function at its potential if not properly installed. Please read the instructions. Don't just guess if you have done it right.

Kinks in high-tensile wire. A small kink in stiff wire will always break. Also avoid hitting this kind of wire with a hammer, as this will easily damage the wire causing a break. Always cut out a damaged section of high tensile wire and splice it. Incidentally, I have found that a hand-tied square knot makes the strongest splice.

Installing in-line strainers close together. Wires will flip together once in awhile. If in-line strainers are installed one above the other, they will sometimes hook up. Separate in-line strainers by a fencepost and they will never catch on each other.

Wires too close to each other. Keep them at least 5 inch apart.

No voltmeter. Without a voltage meter to check how hot a fence is, you're just guessing.

Wire too small. The larger the wire, the more electricity it will carry. Don't skimp.

Inadequate charger. A wimpy fence charger gives you a wimpy fence. Don't skimp here because animals will think a smooth wire fence is a joke without a strong bite, and they'll walk right through it.
 
2018-07-12 03:06:01 PM  
whizzing on it?
 
2018-07-12 03:07:46 PM  
"A fire that has scorched 90,000 acres in Yolo ..."

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:11:44 PM  
bzzzzt
 
2018-07-12 03:13:50 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:14:28 PM  
I doubt that the rancher using this fence knew it was faulty. Electric fences are strung through dry grass all the time and don't cause a problem.
 
2018-07-12 03:14:40 PM  
Yolo trifecta in play?
 
2018-07-12 03:15:00 PM  

edmo: Well that made me wonder so... https://www.ibiblio.org/farming-​connection/grazing/features/fencemis.h​tm

"So you won't have to learn the hard way, here are 17 common mistakes that you should avoid:

Poor earth grounding. Lots of folks (including me) still think you can skimp when it comes to adequate earth grounding. What we must all learn to do, is install several ground rods -- at least three that are 6 to 8 feet long, galvanized, and attached with good ground clamps. The electricity must complete a full circle back to the charger through the ground. Poor grounding gives weak shocks.

Using different types of metals. Don't do it. When you hook up steel wire to copper something call electrolysis happens and the metal becomes corroded, making a poor contact and weakening shocking power.

Inadequate animal training. Each and every animal must learn that the fence hurts. So please build a handy training fence, preferably on heavy wet soil. Flag the fence for visibility, and force the animal to try and cross the fence.

Fenceposts too close together. Well-intended government agencies recommend lots of fenceposts in their fencing specifications. Fifty-foot spacing on flat land is just too close. You want the fence to act like a rubber band. When something runs into the wire, you don't want to break all the insulators or knock posts out of the ground. If the posts are spread apart far enough -- say 80 to 100 feet -- the wire will just bend to the ground and pop back up.

Too many wire tie-offs. Again, fencing specifications may call for braces every quarter mile wire to tie the wire off. But I have found that even 5,000 feet is OK, and actually adds more elasticity in the fence wire. This reduces the chance of wires breaking.

Wires tied tight to each fencepost. To maintain elasticity (the rubber band effect), wires must float past each line fencepost.
"
Building new fences near old existing fences. Old fence wires seem to be always moving somewhere and coming in conta ...


TL:DR
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:21:20 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:25:43 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

It looks safe to me.
 
2018-07-12 03:27:38 PM  
When I was young, and had no sense;
I took a whiz on a 'lectric fence.
It curled my hairs, it scorched my balls,
And made me crap my overalls.
 
2018-07-12 03:27:44 PM  
That's not really a problem in a place where it occasionally rains.
 
2018-07-12 03:31:08 PM  
Ya know, submitter, electric fences aren't designed to create or produce arcs. While they can in fact, arc between different lines of fencing that indicates improper installation, as it significantly decrease effectiveness. They are, however, designed to produce a circuit. Farking moran.
 
2018-07-12 03:31:42 PM  
Unless electric fences have really changed since I was a whippersnapper, you would REALLY have to fark it up to create an arc.
 
2018-07-12 03:33:13 PM  

KyDave: Ya know, submitter, electric fences aren't designed to create or produce arcs. While they can in fact, arc between different lines of fencing that indicates improper installation, as it significantly decrease effectiveness. They are, however, designed to produce a circuit. Farking moran.


(particularly agricultural electric fences: "Danger High Voltage" Jurassic Park fences notwithstanding)
 
2018-07-12 03:36:53 PM  
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:38:23 PM  

KyDave: Ya know, submitter, electric fences aren't designed to create or produce arcs. While they can in fact, arc between different lines of fencing that indicates improper installation, as it significantly decrease effectiveness. They are, however, designed to produce a circuit. Farking moran.


Maybe the dumbass tag was for subby?
 
2018-07-12 03:41:21 PM  
Subby has never lived on a farm.

/piling on
 
2018-07-12 03:42:06 PM  

spatulacity: [img.fark.net image 800x711]


Electoric?
 
2018-07-12 03:42:39 PM  

mr lawson: Subby has never lived on a farm.

/piling on


There is no need to spell an eieio phonetically.
 
2018-07-12 03:46:30 PM  

Snarfangel: mr lawson: Subby has never lived on a farm.

/piling on

There is no need to spell an eieio phonetically.


which word do you think is onomatopoeia spelled out?
 
2018-07-12 03:48:44 PM  
Takes me back to the time one of my friends was dared to touch an electric fence.  He whacked it with a finger and nothing happened so he assumed it was off and grabbed it.  He was wrong.  He just happened to whack it between pulses.  Good times.
 
2018-07-12 03:48:54 PM  
Mommy, mommy, someone touched me in my wildfire area!
 
2018-07-12 03:54:33 PM  

mr lawson: which word do you think is onomatopoeia spelled out?


I think I should have use onomatopoeia in anadverb form...hummmmm??
"Which word do you think is onomatopoetically spelled?"
 
2018-07-12 04:01:29 PM  
You need a good fencing crew for this type of thing. I recommend these guys.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 04:03:24 PM  
Keep telling here in Michigan how northern California is just perfect and wonderful, and how you're so glad you don't have to deal with (OMG!) snow every year.

Tell you what: I'd rather deal with a couple snowstorms every year than a couple firestorms every year.
 
2018-07-12 04:11:22 PM  

WilderKWight: Keep telling here in Michigan how northern California is just perfect and wonderful, and how you're so glad you don't have to deal with (OMG!) snow every year.

Tell you what: I'd rather deal with a couple snowstorms every year than a couple firestorms every year.


Wimp!
 
2018-07-12 04:11:48 PM  

edmo: So please build a handy training fence, preferably on heavy wet soil. Flag the fence for visibility, and force the animal to try and cross the fence.


Riiiiight. *You* are in charge of training the mean, nasty bull that nobody dares get near.
 
2018-07-12 04:12:20 PM  
If your electric fence is arcing you done messed up
 
2018-07-12 04:14:24 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: Unless electric fences have really changed since I was a whippersnapper, you would REALLY have to fark it up to create an arc.


The one I tried it with you could see and/or hear the arc, but it wasn't going to light anything on fire.  If there's anything left after the fire department gets done with him, I suspect the SPCA is next.
 
2018-07-12 04:41:38 PM  

jtown: Takes me back to the time one of my friends was dared to touch an electric fence.  He whacked it with a finger and nothing happened so he assumed it was off and grabbed it.  He was wrong.  He just happened to whack it between pulses.  Good times.


When I was MUCH younger, probably in 1967 or so, our neighbors had an electric fence around their horse paddock. I was leaning in to get a closer look at the horses and inadvertently grabbed onto the electrified wire. That is a sensation I remember to this day...never made that mistake again.
 
2018-07-12 04:46:57 PM  
Note the term "faulty"

Or not, preconceptions, and all ...
 
2018-07-12 05:10:31 PM  
Only an idiot buys from Frankenstein Electric when their voltage needs are merely in the low thousands.
 
2018-07-12 05:14:56 PM  

Nightshade50: [vignette.wikia.nocookie.net image 200x150]



I came here for that, and I leave sassyfied.
 
2018-07-12 06:11:19 PM  
All serious electric fences start with a microwave oven transformer and a couple capacitors...
 
2018-07-12 09:00:55 PM  
*** My fences are for keeping OUT, not IN. As long as the corpse is on the other side of the property line, it's not my problem!
 
2018-07-12 09:52:47 PM  
The one we had was blown off the wall in the barn when lightening struck the fence.  It had a lifetime guarantee, so the company sent a new one.  The cows learned real quick to respect that new one.  The old one, you would catch the more hardy cows leaning into it to reach grass on the other side.  The new one, would drop them to their knees.  There also was a clean hole of about a foot in diameter around the wire where no plants would grow.

/got hit by it a few times
//saw stars
///stars everywhere
 
2018-07-12 11:48:50 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-13 01:59:53 AM  
Earthquake?
Tsunami?
Sharknado?
 
2018-07-13 05:24:31 AM  
Don't Whiz on the Electric Fence Song
Youtube 5X5z0yYGgl4
 
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