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(MSN)   Robert Mueller asks for 100 blank subpoenas and excuse me I need to change my pants   ( msn.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, Virginia, Trump campaign, blank subpoenas, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Trump campaign chairman, counsel Robert Mueller, United States Constitution, Witness  
•       •       •

3367 clicks; posted to Politics » on 12 Jul 2018 at 1:42 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-07-11 08:14:42 PM  
The suspense is terrible! I hope it will last...
Youtube Oci1CuCht7E
 
2018-07-11 08:15:24 PM  
MAKE IT SO.
 
2018-07-11 08:16:25 PM  
/not subby
 
2018-07-11 08:19:12 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-11 08:22:34 PM  
This seems like an appropriate place to ask:

Wasn't the last batch of 30-something subpoena pairs set for yesterday's date?

What happened yesterday?
 
2018-07-11 08:43:44 PM  
smoke and mirrors.  The only hope.  Mueller is the Obi Jaun of hope they got left.
 
2018-07-11 08:44:53 PM  
Tables Turn - The Wonderful 101
Youtube J_moHXjH7pc
Mueller needs to hurry up.  I want to "Press A to Protect America" already.
 
2018-07-11 08:52:18 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-11 09:48:01 PM  
the news that his lawyers were aiding him in sending and receiving emails through them and their laptops should have them up on criminal charges too. I wonder if Mueller has those emails and these new subpoenas have something to do with that?
 
2018-07-11 10:32:47 PM  
Sounds like a bunch of witnesses are going to show up at some bad person's trial.

Proceed...
 
2018-07-12 01:43:08 AM  
Me thinks this will not end in October or November...
 
2018-07-12 01:45:02 AM  
100 blank subpoenas?

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 01:45:18 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 01:47:38 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 01:48:38 AM  
Moist Vagina (2013 Mix)
Youtube DQWTBxsbm1M
 
2018-07-12 01:50:22 AM  
That's a lot. I'd write in god and Elvis just to see if they showed up.
 
2018-07-12 01:50:43 AM  
This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.
 
2018-07-12 01:54:47 AM  

blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.


Math and spelling are not your strong suit. But it is a little ridiculous.
 
2018-07-12 01:55:01 AM  
So... 50 total unique subpoenas here, right? Can anyone shed some light on how narrow each subpoena is required to be -- for instance could this be 50 different individuals AND email phone and bank records for each? Or are different subpoenas required for individual mediums, but the same person -- i.e. a subpoena to me, the witness, and a separate subpoena for my phone records, etc.

I.e., is this likely 50 people + their stuff? 25 people and their stuff? Thanks for any guidance, no need to go into much detail and feel free to throw stones at my ignorance.
 
2018-07-12 01:56:24 AM  
Smokescreen.  Nothingburger.  Witch hunt!
 
2018-07-12 01:59:17 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

100!⚡⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ 100 bank subpoenas!
Ah, ah, ah...
 
2018-07-12 02:01:48 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: [img.fark.net image 480x360]
100!⚡⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ 100 bank subpoenas!
Ah, ah, ah...


bank subpoenas?
media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 02:03:36 AM  

The Zen Philosopher Basho: gozar_the_destroyer: [img.fark.net image 480x360]
100!⚡⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ 100 bank subpoenas!
Ah, ah, ah...

bank subpoenas?
[media1.tenor.com image 373x280]


Maybe they are subpoenas for Russian bankers, AKA the bank subpoenas.
 
2018-07-12 02:04:32 AM  

NateAsbestos: This seems like an appropriate place to ask:

Wasn't the last batch of 30-something subpoena pairs set for yesterday's date?

What happened yesterday?


I was wondering why the #subpoena hashtag was trending so strongly on Hamilton 68.

https://dashboard.securingdemocracy.or​g/

Now there's another 6 Degrees of Clinton murder conspiracy.
 
2018-07-12 02:06:40 AM  
If this version of 'Law & Order' were on PBS, they would be sponsored by Office Depot or Staples.
 
2018-07-12 02:07:08 AM  

The Zen Philosopher Basho: gozar_the_destroyer: [img.fark.net image 480x360]
100!⚡⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ 100 bank subpoenas!
Ah, ah, ah...

bank subpoenas?
[media1.tenor.com image 373x280]


To be fair, spellscheck has failed me, as has my right ring finger.

\having health problems with your hands is a real pain
\\no, not from that
\dictated, not typed
 
2018-07-12 02:15:33 AM  
FTA: The request comes roughly a month after Mueller filed a request for 150 blank subpoenas.

Muhahahaha!

/Felt like the evil laugh was appropriate
 
2018-07-12 02:18:09 AM  

blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.


I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.
 
2018-07-12 02:18:56 AM  

BadReligion: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

Math and spelling are not your strong suit. But it is a little ridiculous.


He's asked for a total of 250.
They come in pairs.

That makes 125 witnesses.
 
2018-07-12 02:21:11 AM  
Not without*

Hey, I'm not on the clock here.   This is a teensy screen, anyway.

/excuses, excuses
 
2018-07-12 02:21:30 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.


I expect Herr Drumpf to be screaming about this on Twitter in the next 48 hours.

It might take until next year to get new charges just because of all the rats, roaches, and snakes they keep finding. It's like a dark horror comedy where there are so many dead bodies you start laughing due to the absurdity of it all.
 
2018-07-12 02:27:14 AM  

gozar_the_destroyer: [img.fark.net image 480x360]
100!⚡⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ ⚡ 100 bank subpoenas!
Ah, ah, ah...


**thunderclap**
 
2018-07-12 02:27:32 AM  

BlueDWarrior: PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.

I expect Herr Drumpf to be screaming about this on Twitter in the next 48 hours.

It might take until next year to get new charges just because of all the rats, roaches, and snakes they keep finding. It's like a dark horror comedy where there are so many dead bodies you start laughing due to the absurdity of it all.


I can imagine multiple dollies wheeled in stacked with boxes crammed full of potential exhibits.

You get to where you can gauge how long a session is going to take by A) how many attorneys file into the room and B) how many of those bloody dollies their assistants are toting.

I don't even want to contemplate how much paper evidence alone is going to come out of this thing.  O'god.

I have to laugh bleakly sometimes, yeah.
 
2018-07-12 02:30:36 AM  
So many subpoeni
 
2018-07-12 02:36:03 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.


Thanks.
They're expecting the trial to take three weeks.
That's just over 8 witnesses a day.


http://www.columbian.com/news/2017/no​v​/03/mueller-expects-manafort-trial-to-​last-3-weeks/
 
2018-07-12 02:37:05 AM  
maybe he's just out of printer paper.
 
2018-07-12 02:41:26 AM  
This can't be true. FAKE NEWS!! I was assured by Giuliani several months ago that this investigation would be wrapped up in two weeks.
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 02:42:55 AM  
I've been assured by conservatives that Mueller hasn't found one single solitary shred of evidence, so I wonder, why would there be any need for subpoenas? My guess is that he and his team are using them as a Mad Libs type party game. I mean, the name fits, right?
 
2018-07-12 02:43:31 AM  
Hillary Clinton had her philandering husband and exactly 98 other senior staff on her campaign. Coincidence? I think not. Chickens are coming home to roost.
 
2018-07-12 02:45:59 AM  

blastoh: PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.

Thanks.
They're expecting the trial to take three weeks.
That's just over 8 witnesses a day.


http://www.columbian.com/news/2017/nov​/03/mueller-expects-manafort-trial-to-​last-3-weeks/


Interesting.  I have not followed all of this extensively, but from the sound of that maybe they aren't deposing them.  That would be a media circus all its own.

Like I said, I'm a small fry.  I type words on a funny keyboard.

Now for some reporter humor:
img.fark.netView Full Size

Off to the beauty sleep.
 
2018-07-12 02:54:50 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:04:17 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 03:06:11 AM  

raerae1980: /not subby


That's the only reason I clicked on this, was to check if it was you. Thanks for clearing that up early.
 
2018-07-12 03:09:44 AM  

NateAsbestos: Wasn't the last batch of 30-something subpoena pairs set for yesterday's date?

What happened yesterday?


The start of the trial was delayed at the request of the defense.

But the judge did order Manafort moved from his VIP cell to a less glamorous facility in Alexandria yesterday. Apparently, Manafort was angling for further delays because being so far from DC made it difficult to meet with his lawyers and the judge called his bluff.
 
2018-07-12 03:22:38 AM  

talan123: Me thinks this will not end in October or November...


You are correct.
 
2018-07-12 03:40:20 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: blastoh: This is on top of the previous 150.

That makes a total of 125 people being subpoenad to testify at this trial.

Anyone know how normal that is?  That sounds rediculous, but this is something I don't have a strong background in.

I'm a court reporter.  I do mostly discovery depositions, pre-trial stuff, which is different than actual court testimony in that a judge is generally not present and the setting is more informal.

The average witness in the smallish cases I tend to report may testify from a half-hour to a couple of hours.

On some of these cases the attorneys can cycle six or seven people in and out and be done in under three.  This is stuff like assault cases and bar fights and accident claims.

Now, I don't know as much about how federal cases work, but they are probably going to depose many of these people prior to whatever sort of trial/hearing might take place.  They may not use them all.

And I'm going to guess

and it's a fairly educated guess

that some, if not many, of these folks are going to be grilled for multiple eight-hour days.

Then the transcripts have to be compiled.  An hour of fast-paced testimony can easily run 60-80 pages.
Hundreds of pages don't edit themselves overnight, at least not with a hell of a lot of elbow grease.

From my own experience, and take it with a grain of salt, the deposition testimony of a hundred or more witnesses in a high-profile case like this could easily take months.

So, yeah.


Can you imagine having to transcribe the entire court record? Someone is going to be working on that alone all year.

And the shiat they will have to hear! They will wear their foot-pedal out backing up, "He didn't really just say that, did he?!".
 
2018-07-12 04:52:34 AM  

fnordfocus: NateAsbestos: Wasn't the last batch of 30-something subpoena pairs set for yesterday's date?

What happened yesterday?

The start of the trial was delayed at the request of the defense.

But the judge did order Manafort moved from his VIP cell to a less glamorous facility in Alexandria yesterday. Apparently, Manafort was angling for further delays because being so far from DC made it difficult to meet with his lawyers and the judge called his bluff.


Link?
I read last night he has a phone, laptop, and doesn't have to wear a prison uniform, FFS.
 
2018-07-12 05:58:26 AM  
Aaaaaaaaany day now, mueller.
 
2018-07-12 06:05:36 AM  

fastfxr: fnordfocus: NateAsbestos: Wasn't the last batch of 30-something subpoena pairs set for yesterday's date?

What happened yesterday?

The start of the trial was delayed at the request of the defense.

But the judge did order Manafort moved from his VIP cell to a less glamorous facility in Alexandria yesterday. Apparently, Manafort was angling for further delays because being so far from DC made it difficult to meet with his lawyers and the judge called his bluff.

Link?
I read last night he has a phone, laptop, and doesn't have to wear a prison uniform, FFS.


In his order, Ellis directed the Alexandria jail to allow Manafort, "to the extent practically possible" to meet with his attorneys for eight hours a day until trial.
He noted that the Alexandria jail has housed many high-profile detainees, "including foreign and domestic terrorists, spies and traitors."

BURN!
 
2018-07-12 06:52:18 AM  
SPLOOSH!!!

img.fark.netView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
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