Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(British Psychological Society)   It turns out that open plan offices actually reduce collaboration and face-time (probably because workers are tired of seeing faces all the time)   ( digest.bps.org.uk) divider line
    More: Misc, Office, open-plan offices, open-plan office, Cubicle, large open-plan offices, fully open-plan workspace, open-plan office space, open-plan office environment  
•       •       •

921 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Jul 2018 at 4:35 PM (6 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



80 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
6 days ago  
I hate them. YMPWV
 
6 days ago  
Anytime I'm at a place that's talking about setting up open workspaces, I buy a copy of this book and leave it in the lunchroom:
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
6 days ago  
I don't hate them. But I hate when Senior Management keep their offices.
 
6 days ago  
It would cut down on Fark posting during the day. Not sure I could keep my sanity if all I had to occupy my mind all day was work and the only people to interact with were my cow-orkers.
 
6 days ago  
How are you supposed to hold a conversation when everybody's in one big room where everybody's making noise?

Sometimes you need a door you can close.
 
6 days ago  
Duh.
 
6 days ago  
FTA: "As well as their cost-saving appeal, the rationale for large open-plan offices is that they are expected to act as a crucible for human chemistry, increasing face-to-face encounters between colleagues to the benefit of creativity and collaboration."

It's not a "rationale", it's a rationalization. The one and only reason for open-plan offices is cost savings.
 
6 days ago  
No way. I like my large cubicle tyvm. Good perk for a humble engineer.
 
6 days ago  
This is not a surprise to anyone except those selling open plan offices, and those trying to save money by using open plan offices. Anybody who actually sits in one knows they're complete garbage.
 
6 days ago  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
6 days ago  
I enjoy friendly banter with coworkers that everyone in the office can also hear and enjoy. I similarly enjoy taking calls from my proctologist on speakerphone in the middle of the produce section of the grocery store.
 
6 days ago  
Open floor plans suck for everyone who has to work in them.

It sure does give the director looking out of his glass-walled office a purty view though. Like being paid to stare at an aquarium...
 
6 days ago  
We're in the process of switching to these. It is hell for most of our workforce because they rarely collaborate. So not only are we making this switch, they are changing most of their processes to require collaborative work. Oh, and no one has an assigned desk anymore and you have 1/3 of the workspace you used to have.

It makes legal work (compliance) a living nightmare. Rather sad because I like my coworkers and I have great benefits at this company but I'm tempted to leave. (We have also had massive turnover since this process started. No surprises there. And we aren't that big of a company, so we feel the losses keenly.)
 
6 days ago  
We went to an open office two years ago. I don't know if it increased collaboration but I certainly masturbate at my desk much less often.
 
6 days ago  
This commercial actually summed up the suckage really well
FedEx Commercial
Youtube Z7VuvXihcw0
 
6 days ago  
last place i worked was half open, half offices.  problem was that the loudest, most talkative people were the ones with the offices and loved to come out and talk, or just shout out of the offices to each other
 
6 days ago  

bloobeary: How are you supposed to hold a conversation when everybody's in one big room where everybody's making noise?

Sometimes you need a door you can close.


I used to work tech support. It's hard to concentrate on my support call while the people on either side of me are working on their calls as well. Even having a partial divider between workers is better than nothing. And for god's sake don't sit everyone at one long desk! Even with the divider you still have the person next to you. Put people at an angle to each other so sound is deflected by the divider.
 
6 days ago  
I'd rather sit in a cubicle and avoid Subway farts at 2 in the afternoon.

If you need to talk to me, I have email.
 
6 days ago  
I can verify that working in an "open plan" office made me farking hate most of my coworkers. Having to hear their phones ring (not the office phone, their personal phones) multiple times a day, hearing their belching (constant belching, not quite as bad as Rick Sanchez, but almost), smelling their lunch, etc. Repellent and extremely distracting. And there was no place to go for quiet.

I sat about 3-6 feet away from about 8 other people and hated every second of it.

Don't even get me started on the farking assholes who had offices but didn't give even half a fark about being reasonably quiet while having meetings, conference calls, etc.
 
6 days ago  
I suspect this will be a very unpopular opinion here but....I remain very skeptical of claims regarding decreased performance in open office plans.  Maybe it's just anecdotal based as a developer / manager of developers having an openish area really has worked out better.

I was a consultant, so that means lots of projects of different sizes and lengths with different teams in different locations.  Sometimes we work out of our office, sometimes the team is spread throughout a building, sometimes we're in a closet.  Without a doubt, having everyone on the team in the same room worked out the best.  People slacked off less and were available to help more.

Sure, the last thing I want is my boss sitting next to me, watching everything I do; but the truth is, I (like most people) are going to waste a certain amount of time each day on non-work crap.  Having my boss next to me means I keep that to a minimum and only waste time in work appropriate ways.

Give me a private office and it'll be less than a week before I'm doing very not work appropriate things and wasting far more time than I should on non-work related stuff.  Also, having worked with remote teams, when everyone is in the same room, nobody ever randomly misses an important meeting because 'they forgot' or 'didn't see Outlook popup'.

I know, I know, I'm not supposed to feel this way.  And yeah, I'd love my own private office and I do get annoyed when I hear the guy or girl behind me tapping their foot....but I don't think it's an issue of cutting costs.  Again, when we were onsite at the client's office, were weren't paying for space, they were, and we'd still request for all of us to be together in an open/shared office space.
 
6 days ago  

Gubbo: I don't hate them. But I hate when Senior Management keep their offices.


The two best companies I ever worked for had open offices, and *everyone* was in it with the exceptions of the CEO and HR/Legal.

Current company just spent $3 million on an office renovation.  End result is that cubes got stupidly small and offices got much larger.  This is easily the worst company I've ever worked at in 30 years.  If I didn't love what I do, I'd be gone, and I'm probably gone anyway.
 
6 days ago  
My office ended up buying everyone $350 noise cancelling headphones of our choice to bribe us into biatching less about the open office they've stuck us in.  We still biatch, but honestly those headphones let me concentrate when I need to, it also helps to develop a solid biatchy-resting-face to discourage people from trying to get your attention.
 
6 days ago  

Rent Party: Gubbo: I don't hate them. But I hate when Senior Management keep their offices.

The two best companies I ever worked for had open offices, and *everyone* was in it with the exceptions of the CEO and HR/Legal.

Current company just spent $3 million on an office renovation.  End result is that cubes got stupidly small and offices got much larger.  This is easily the worst company I've ever worked at in 30 years.  If I didn't love what I do, I'd be gone, and I'm probably gone anyway.


If I call a company and here everyone in the background, it is not a a good sign.
 
6 days ago  

bloobeary: How are you supposed to hold a conversation when everybody's in one big room where everybody's making noise?

Sometimes you need a door you can close.


The client I'm at has everyone in an open office.  Maybe directors and up get offices but they're in another building - out of sight, etc.  Anyway, while it's all open, there a boatload of huddle room in varying sizes and capabilities you can use from one person with a table and phone to 6 people with a TV and speakerphone.  When I go onsite I usually camp out for the day in a huddle room.
 
6 days ago  
Never had to work in an open office, my wife does and it's the main reason she's looking for a different job. The place had cubicals when she started, but the owner wanted to cram more people into the space.
 
6 days ago  
Open office doesn't mean the same thing to everyone. Some people will say having a department of, say ten people in a single room, isn't an open office - an open office is when lots of people are in a big room. Whatever you want to call it, the best arrangement in my opinion is when the people you actually work with are in the same room, but the boss has his own office, and there are no other departments sharing the space. But that also comes from the perspective of not thinking my job is making phone calls, and therefore not focusing on a quiet space to make them as the most important thing.
 
6 days ago  
Oh and I'll add this about how I'm finding the switch to an open office:  I think we do generally make better decisions regarding our work due to increased communication...but I definitely find I am accomplishing a lot less because because those discussions eat from time that'd be spent following through with those plans.
 
6 days ago  
I have a semi-private office where nobody can look over my shoulder.  The only foot traffic is from a few people in the accounting office next door that occasionally pass through.  When someone comes in, they only see the back of my wall of monitors.  I don't even have an extra chair, to discourage anyone from wanting to hang out and chit chat.  It ain't glamorous; lots of ducts & sprinkler pipes, but it's all mine.
 
6 days ago  
We just moved into a new open space.  I'm a bit loud under the best conditions, the open concept just seems to make it worse.  My boss has hinted that I might need to find a way to work from home more often.

/not unhappy about that
 
6 days ago  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I suspect this will be a very unpopular opinion here but....I remain very skeptical of claims regarding decreased performance in open office plans.  Maybe it's just anecdotal based as a developer / manager of developers having an openish area really has worked out better.

I was a consultant, so that means lots of projects of different sizes and lengths with different teams in different locations.  Sometimes we work out of our office, sometimes the team is spread throughout a building, sometimes we're in a closet.  Without a doubt, having everyone on the team in the same room worked out the best.  People slacked off less and were available to help more.

Sure, the last thing I want is my boss sitting next to me, watching everything I do; but the truth is, I (like most people) are going to waste a certain amount of time each day on non-work crap.  Having my boss next to me means I keep that to a minimum and only waste time in work appropriate ways.

Give me a private office and it'll be less than a week before I'm doing very not work appropriate things and wasting far more time than I should on non-work related stuff.  Also, having worked with remote teams, when everyone is in the same room, nobody ever randomly misses an important meeting because 'they forgot' or 'didn't see Outlook popup'.

I know, I know, I'm not supposed to feel this way.  And yeah, I'd love my own private office and I do get annoyed when I hear the guy or girl behind me tapping their foot....but I don't think it's an issue of cutting costs.  Again, when we were onsite at the client's office, were weren't paying for space, they were, and we'd still request for all of us to be together in an open/shared office space.


It really depends on the job you do.

My last position was as a DBA and the head of a team of reporting analysts.  There were five or six of us in a smallish office (it happened to be a second floor corner office, so we had large windows).  Because we were all developers/analysts/techs of various kinds, there was very little ambient noise generally except typing; obviously there were occasional phone calls and visitors, and we'd chit-chat about stuff now and then, but mostly it was quiet.  It worked great, and when something came up that everyone needed to be involved in (which was often), we were all there and participating.

In a separate part of the company, they had a high-volume call center with a similar setting (5-6 people all in a smallish office).  They were all on the phone all the time - like, 6 to 7 hours out of an 8-hour work day.  It was hell.  They kept having people quit or transfer to other departments and finally hit on the fact that no one could concentrate or do anything with that much activity going on.  They moved the group into a different area that had noise dampening and cubicle walls between them.  Turnover dropped to normal levels, and productivity actually went up.

Some jobs work well with open offices.  Some don't.  One size does not fit all.
 
6 days ago  
I have an office with a door with my name on it--

It's a work truck.  Because working in an office is complete dildos.  Rather be digging a trench and nailing down plastic chairs for a 6" duct bank, rather than having to tolerate some fat fark's sweaty, complainy, back-stabby workplace politics in an air-conditioned box.  In fact, I've actually gotten a friend (also a college grad) to jump ship from white collar and enter the unionized trades.  He's absolutely no regrets.

/The most important life lesson I've learned to date is that the hardest way and the most rewarding are the exact same paths.  Never quit--never give up.
//It just gets easier as the years soldier on
 
6 days ago  

arcgear: I have an office with a door with my name on it--

It's a work truck.  Because working in an office is complete dildos.  Rather be digging a trench and nailing down plastic chairs for a 6" duct bank, rather than having to tolerate some fat fark's sweaty, complainy, back-stabby workplace politics in an air-conditioned box.  In fact, I've actually gotten a friend (also a college grad) to jump ship from white collar and enter the unionized trades.  He's absolutely no regrets.

/The most important life lesson I've learned to date is that the hardest way and the most rewarding are the exact same paths.  Never quit--never give up.
//It just gets easier as the years soldier on


What's a 6" duct bank cost these days anyhow?
 
6 days ago  

hlehmann: I have a semi-private office where nobody can look over my shoulder.  The only foot traffic is from a few people in the accounting office next door that occasionally pass through.  When someone comes in, they only see the back of my wall of monitors.  I don't even have an extra chair, to discourage anyone from wanting to hang out and chit chat.  It ain't glamorous; lots of ducts & sprinkler pipes, but it's all mine.


Those are the best offices, imo, although hot water pipes can suck in the sumer. Even better are old mainframe terminal rooms that haven't been used in decades and most of the soon-to-be-retirees don't even know where they are.
 
6 days ago  

MrBallou: It would cut down on Fark posting during the day. Not sure I could keep my sanity if all I had to occupy my mind all day was work and the only people to interact with were my cow-orkers.


Dairy farm?
 
6 days ago  

obenchainr: In a separate part of the company, they had a high-volume call center with a similar setting (5-6 people all in a smallish office).  They were all on the phone all the time - like, 6 to 7 hours out of an 8-hour work day.  It was hell.  They kept having people quit or transfer to other departments and finally hit on the fact that no one could concentrate or do anything with that much activity going on.  They moved the group into a different area that had noise dampening and cubicle walls between them.  Turnover dropped to normal levels, and productivity actually went up.


Fark open office plans. I'm an architect at a tech company. My job entails thinking long and hard about very stupid details about computer security, getting them right, and writing them down so they can be implemented by developers. Not exaggerating too much, I screw up, things blow up, and the lights turn off. So a quiet, calm area without a lot of traffic is great environment.

I used to have an IT group that did a lot of development work near me. Lots of quiet typing. They got shifted to somewhere else because their group got bigger and they needed more space. Instead, they put an HR recruiting team right next to me. They're on the phone 5 hours a day, all 5 of them at once, soliciting and cajoling folks to join my company. Yeah, even with good headphones, my work productivity has gone down due to the constant droning on about job offers, touching base, being active in their job hunt, etc.

My group is thinking about asking the building manager to move them. We don't want to lose our primo spot, we have some nice windows. And we've been there longer.
 
6 days ago  

HempHead: arcgear: I have an office with a door with my name on it--

It's a work truck.  Because working in an office is complete dildos.  Rather be digging a trench and nailing down plastic chairs for a 6" duct bank, rather than having to tolerate some fat fark's sweaty, complainy, back-stabby workplace politics in an air-conditioned box.  In fact, I've actually gotten a friend (also a college grad) to jump ship from white collar and enter the unionized trades.  He's absolutely no regrets.

/The most important life lesson I've learned to date is that the hardest way and the most rewarding are the exact same paths.  Never quit--never give up.
//It just gets easier as the years soldier on

What's a 6" duct bank cost these days anyhow?


I work for a utility, the engineers (project manager) that i receive the prints to build from usually crunches those numbers.  Yet, it's not like anything you'd really see anywhere else other than a power station: sometimes can be a rack of 36 pipes and with complete slurry backfill.  The cost must be astronomical.

Wish i could give a hard number
 
6 days ago  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: We just moved into a new open space.  I'm a bit loud under the best conditions, the open concept just seems to make it worse.  My boss has hinted that I might need to find a way to work from home more often.

/not unhappy about that


User name checks out
 
6 days ago  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Give me a private office and it'll be less than a week before I'm doing very not work appropriate things and wasting far more time than I should on non-work related stuff. Also, having worked with remote teams, when everyone is in the same room, nobody ever randomly misses an important meeting because 'they forgot' or 'didn't see Outlook popup'.


When people say they hate open plan offices, they don't mean they want to go to full blown private offices. An open plan office is characterized by absolutely no barriers whatsoever between workers. So that means everyone can see what everyone is doing, everyone can hear what everyone is saying, etc.

An office with cubicles offers a little bit of privacy for individual workers, while allowing sound absorption. Assuming, of course, that these are proper, full height cubes, and not the shiatty half-height ones where you can stand up and see everyone around you. You can also put people in the same team in cubes next to each other, gaining the same collaboration benefits that open office supposedly has.

The only legitimate reason people move from cubicles to open office is price. You can cram more workers into the same space when you don't have cubicle walls and spacing requirements.
 
6 days ago  

cloudofdust: FTA: "As well as their cost-saving appeal, the rationale for large open-plan offices is that they are expected to act as a crucible for human chemistry, increasing face-to-face encounters between colleagues to the benefit of creativity and collaboration."

It's not a "rationale", it's a rationalization. The one and only reason for open-plan offices is cost savings.


This.  They'd start stacking employees on top of each other if they could then think up some bullshiat sundae to cover it up afterwards.
 
6 days ago  

HempHead: What's a 6" duct bank cost these days anyhow?


About 10 pounds.
 
6 days ago  

trialpha: Fark_Guy_Rob: Give me a private office and it'll be less than a week before I'm doing very not work appropriate things and wasting far more time than I should on non-work related stuff. Also, having worked with remote teams, when everyone is in the same room, nobody ever randomly misses an important meeting because 'they forgot' or 'didn't see Outlook popup'.

When people say they hate open plan offices, they don't mean they want to go to full blown private offices. An open plan office is characterized by absolutely no barriers whatsoever between workers. So that means everyone can see what everyone is doing, everyone can hear what everyone is saying, etc.

An office with cubicles offers a little bit of privacy for individual workers, while allowing sound absorption. Assuming, of course, that these are proper, full height cubes, and not the shiatty half-height ones where you can stand up and see everyone around you. You can also put people in the same team in cubes next to each other, gaining the same collaboration benefits that open office supposedly has.

The only legitimate reason people move from cubicles to open office is price. You can cram more workers into the same space when you don't have cubicle walls and spacing requirements.


That's a great point - thank you for pointing it out.

Some of what I'm thinking of as a 'open office space' might not really be.
 
6 days ago  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: We just moved into a new open space.  I'm a bit loud under the best conditions, the open concept just seems to make it worse.  My boss has hinted that I might need to find a way to work from home more often.

/not unhappy about that


User name checks out.
 
6 days ago  

BlazeTrailer: SoundOfOneHandWanking: We just moved into a new open space.  I'm a bit loud under the best conditions, the open concept just seems to make it worse.  My boss has hinted that I might need to find a way to work from home more often.

/not unhappy about that

User name checks out


Well I knew I should've scrolled down further into the thread.

/shakes fist
//not that kind of fist shaking
 
6 days ago  
Open floor plans cause mass shootings in a study by duh
 
6 days ago  
If I stay at my current employer, I will be subjected to this hell in about 2 years due to a remodel of our building. Funny thing is they are springing for Bose noise cancelling headphones. WTF?
 
6 days ago  
Our office in Houston just switched to this. I got a tour and discovered that there *are* offices you can reserve for the day, but they're first come/first serve. (No, I don't know how those concepts work together.) I commented that anyone senior but who doesn't qualify for an office will pull rank if they have to, even if it means kicking an underling out.
 
6 days ago  

Thosw: Our office in Houston just switched to this. I got a tour and discovered that there *are* offices you can reserve for the day, but they're first come/first serve. (No, I don't know how those concepts work together.) I commented that anyone senior but who doesn't qualify for an office will pull rank if they have to, even if it means kicking an underling out.


Have to? Hell, sometimes just because they want to.
 
6 days ago  

trialpha: An open plan office is characterized by absolutely no barriers whatsoever between workers.


Always reminds me of a scene from Equilibrium (and a few other dystopian movies).

tboake.comView Full Size
 
6 days ago  
You could always live the life you dream of instead of the one handed to you
 
6 days ago  
comingsoon.netView Full Size
 
Displayed 50 of 80 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report