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(CBS Sacramento)   Warning: Your deer is a jar   ( sacramento.cbslocal.com) divider line
    More: Scary, neighbor Sandra Purcell, peanut butter jar, placer county, Peanut butter, young mother deer, Deer, spokesperson Kyle Orr, Debra Twardus  
•       •       •

5647 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jul 2018 at 10:50 PM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-07-11 05:42:50 PM  
"got milk?" commercial?
 
2018-07-11 06:35:25 PM  
The Department of Fish and Wildlife has not received any official request for help so far. The agency spokesperson also said it is illegal for any private citizens to take possession of the deer in order to rescue it.

Consider a nationally-available news story your "official request" you dumb motherf*ckers.
 
2018-07-11 09:09:54 PM  
Does this effect the validity of my argument?
 
2018-07-11 10:02:29 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-11 11:06:07 PM  
I've got a lasso, and I know how to use it.
Anybody else available to cut away the jar?
Alternatively, if it's a glass jar, I can take care of that with well-aimed pellet.
 
2018-07-11 11:08:43 PM  
Lately the deer has been in my car with the bolting/ crossing road without looking both ways.
 
2018-07-11 11:13:25 PM  
Apparently deer didn't understand box lunch and now owes subette a jar of PB
 
2018-07-11 11:15:42 PM  

turbidette: I've got a lasso, and I know how to use it.
Anybody else available to cut away the jar?
Alternatively, if it's a glass jar, I can take care of that with well-aimed pellet.


Good luck wtih that.... fun fake news story but more than a few grains of truth behind it...

I had this idea that I was going to rope a deer, put it in
a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it.
The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured
that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear
of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the
bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not
be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it
down) then hog tie it and transport it home.
I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with
my rope.
The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well
back. They were not having any of it.
After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up -- 3 of them. I
picked out.. ..a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and
threw.. My rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me.
I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so
I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could
tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation.
I took a step towards it...it took a step away. I put a little
tension on the rope and then received an education.
The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may
just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action
when you start pulling on that rope.
That deer EXPLODED.
The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer
is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could
fight down with a rope and with some dignity.
A deer-- no chance.
That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was
no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet
and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer
on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined.
The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina
as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as
quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me
a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out
of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed
venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope.
I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around
its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was
no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing,
and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.
Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where
I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large
rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to
recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility
for the situation we were in, so I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow
death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder -
a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute.
I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could
get my rope back.
Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million
years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised
when I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist.
Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a
horse where they just bite you and then let go. A deer bites you and shakes
its head --almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts.
The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably
to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method
was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes,
but it was likely only several seconds.
I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning
that claim by now), tricked it.
While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right
arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when
I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.
Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear
right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and
their hooves are surprisingly sharp. I learned a long time ago that, when an animal
-- like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily,
the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards
the animal.
This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you
can escape.
This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such
trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different
strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run.
The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and
run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will
hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after
all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second
I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.
Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does
not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger
has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you
while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.
I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went
away.
So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring
a rifle with a scope to sort of even the odds.
 
2018-07-11 11:26:27 PM  
With a heavy lid
My pop quiz kid
 
2018-07-11 11:27:43 PM  
have the right permit....get the back-strap out---soak in buttermilk---bread and fry---then make gravy---BAMM
 
2018-07-11 11:29:44 PM  

i.r.id10t: turbidette: I've got a lasso, and I know how to use it.
Anybody else available to cut away the jar?
Alternatively, if it's a glass jar, I can take care of that with well-aimed pellet.

Good luck wtih that.... fun fake news story but more than a few grains of truth behind it...

I had this idea that I was going to rope a deer, put it in
a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it.
The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured
that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear
of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the
bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not
be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it
down) then hog tie it and transport it home.
I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with
my rope.
The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well
back. They were not having any of it.
After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up -- 3 of them. I
picked out.. ..a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and
threw.. My rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me.
I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so
I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could
tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation.
I took a step towards it...it took a step away. I put a little
tension on the rope and then received an education.
The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may
just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action
when you start pulling on that rope.
That deer EXPLODED.
The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer
is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could
fight down with a rope and with some dignity.
A deer-- no chance.
That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was
no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet
and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer
on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined.
The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina
as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as
quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me
a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out
of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed
venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope.
I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around
its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was
no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing,
and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.
Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where
I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large
rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to
recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility
for the situation we were in, so I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow
death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder -
a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute.
I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could
get my rope back.
Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million
years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised
when I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist.
Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a
horse where they just bite you and then let go. A deer bites you and shakes
its head --almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts.
The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably
to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method
was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes,
but it was likely only several seconds.
I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning
that claim by now), tricked it.
While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right
arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when
I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.
Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear
right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and
their hooves are surprisingly sharp. I learned a long time ago that, when an animal
-- like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily,
the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards
the animal.
This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you
can escape.
This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such
trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different
strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run.
The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and
run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will
hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after
all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second
I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.
Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does
not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger
has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you
while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.
I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went
away.
So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring
a rifle with a scope to sort of even the odds.


Tl:dr
coont
 
Juc
2018-07-11 11:37:48 PM  
They're asking what will happen to the doe? It'll be saved by humans or it will die. Tada mystery solved.
 
2018-07-12 12:08:40 AM  
One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.
 
2018-07-12 12:11:22 AM  
"You can tell she just wants to eat," Twardus said. "You know, she's hungry, she's thirsty..."


Maybe try the Pander express.  It's a favorite among you shiatty local news outlets
/ 😠
//every single time, apparently
 
2018-07-12 12:12:13 AM  

Juc: They're asking what will happen to the doe? It'll be saved by humans or it will die. Tada mystery solved.


It will come back for REVENGE.

Queens Of The Stone Age - No One Knows
Youtube s88r_q7oufE
 
2018-07-12 12:12:16 AM  

NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.


Learn to drive
 
2018-07-12 12:19:33 AM  

doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive


Suck my balls.
 
2018-07-12 12:22:04 AM  
If the internet has taught me anything the sensible thing to do is to ban peanut butter jars.

Is it a plastic jar or a glass jar.  I watched a video the other day of a guy sniping a house sparrow (it's an invasive species and it had chased a non-invasive species out of the house he'd set up for them.)  Makes me wonder if, depending on the jar material, if you couldn't snipe it off...

I mean, best case scenario you free the deer.  Worst case scenario you have venison.
 
2018-07-12 12:27:11 AM  
"This is a human-caused problem, I think we need to fix it," Purcell said.

The fact that we continuously encroach on their habitat is also a human-caused problem. Solution? Kill the deer, of course.
 
2018-07-12 12:51:13 AM  
FTA:
""My suspicion is it might have been used for baiting, deer for hunting," neighbor Sandra Purcell said."

Eeewwwwww

/commas, how do they work?!
 
2018-07-12 12:57:49 AM  

i.r.id10t: turbidette: I've got a lasso, and I know how to use it.
Anybody else available to cut away the jar?
Alternatively, if it's a glass jar, I can take care of that with well-aimed pellet.

Good luck wtih that.... fun fake news story but more than a few grains of truth behind it...

I had this idea that I was going to rope a deer, put it in
a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it.
The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured
that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear
of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the
bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not
be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it
down) then hog tie it and transport it home.
I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with
my rope.
The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well
back. They were not having any of it.
After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up -- 3 of them. I
picked out.. ..a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and
threw.. My rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me.
I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so
I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could
tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation.
I took a step towards it...it took a step away. I put a little
tension on the rope and then received an education.
The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may
just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action
when you start pulling on that rope.
That deer EXPLODED.
The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer
is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could
fight down with a rope and with some dignity.
A deer-- no chance.
That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was
no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet
and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer
on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined.
The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina
as many other animals.

A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as
quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me
a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out
of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed
venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope.
I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around
its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At the time, there was
no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing,
and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual.
Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where
I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large
rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to
recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility
for the situation we were in, so I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow
death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder -
a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute.
I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could
get my rope back.
Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million
years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised
when I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist.
Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a
horse where they just bite you and then let go. A deer bites you and shakes
its head --almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts.
The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably
to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method
was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes,
but it was likely only several seconds.
I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning
that claim by now), tricked it.
While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right
arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when
I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.
Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear
right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and
their hooves are surprisingly sharp. I learned a long time ago that, when an animal
-- like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily,
the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards
the animal.
This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you
can escape.
This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such
trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different
strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run.
The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and
run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will
hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after
all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second
I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.
Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does
not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger
has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you
while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.
I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went
away.
So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring
a rifle with a scope to sort of even the odds.


Yeah, there's no way I'd try to capture a healthy doe. But I've who hasn't had anything to eat or drink in a few days will be easier.
 
2018-07-12 12:58:47 AM  

doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive


Doesn't matter how good of a driver you are when a deer jumps out the brush on the side of the road only a few feet in front of you while your travels 60+mph.
 
2018-07-12 12:59:26 AM  

Resident Muslim: FTA:
""My suspicion is it might have been used for baiting, deer for hunting," neighbor Sandra Purcell said."

Eeewwwwww

/commas, how do they work?!


Go away!  Baiting.
 
2018-07-12 01:02:32 AM  

tjsands1118: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Doesn't matter how good of a driver you are when a deer jumps out the brush on the side of the road only a few feet in front of you while your travels 60+mph.


Or when you're stopped in traffic, a whole herd plows through, and one hits the side of your car.
 
2018-07-12 01:21:09 AM  

NINEv2: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Suck my balls.


I think I spotted your ride.

img.fark.netView Full Size
/ I keed
 
2018-07-12 01:27:36 AM  

doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive


You must not live in an area that has a lot of deer. I did. Hunting season can be a nightmare. Deer are on the run. They will fark up your car in a blind panic. Half the time you don't even know they're there until they're running into your car. Not much time to react.
 
2018-07-12 01:30:22 AM  

doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive


Learn to hunt.

/Proud killer of deer by archery
//Shot two last year
///Then another with a rifle
 
2018-07-12 01:41:29 AM  

parkthebus: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Learn to hunt.

/Proud killer of deer by archery
//Shot two last year
///Then another with a rifle


How'd the deer get a rifle?
 
2018-07-12 02:25:48 AM  

doglover: Learn to drive


A) Skill doesn't necessarily matter into it, they will sometimes literally jump out inches in front of your car. Or, in my dad's case-

B) They will jump into the side of your car. One slammed into my dad's car *while it was traveling at speed* and farked up the wheel well so bad that the metal was *almost*, but not quite, touching the tire.
 
2018-07-12 02:38:02 AM  

Felgraf: doglover: Learn to drive

A) Skill doesn't necessarily matter into it, they will sometimes literally jump out inches in front of your car. Or, in my dad's case-

B) They will jump into the side of your car. One slammed into my dad's car *while it was traveling at speed* and farked up the wheel well so bad that the metal was *almost*, but not quite, touching the tire.


I grew up in Western PA, I know the dangers of whitetails, but I don't know many people who hit more than one. Pretend they're really big kids and scan for them in likely areas. They're animals not suicide bombers.

Now birbs. I love birbs, but birbs loved hitting my grill.  I don't miss prying bloody feathers and sometimes sad little sparrow corpses out of the bars. Half the time you didn't even know you'd hit one.
 
2018-07-12 03:19:27 AM  

ajgeek: tjsands1118: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Doesn't matter how good of a driver you are when a deer jumps out the brush on the side of the road only a few feet in front of you while your travels 60+mph.

Or when you're stopped in traffic, a whole herd plows through, and one hits the side of your car.


I had a combination of those two happen once.  I was driving along in the middle of the day and there was a deer clearly visible standing in the snow about 10 yards off the shoulder, so I slowed down.  But I was on a highway, in traffic, and couldn't stop completely.  The deer decided it'd be fun to run through foot-deep snow and right into the side of the van I was driving while I was going about 30 mph.  It got up and ran off again, so I suspect it was fine, but it did dent the sliding door and almost ripped the tail light out of its housing.

Deer are not bright creatures.
 
2018-07-12 04:25:23 AM  

doglover: Felgraf: doglover: Learn to drive

A) Skill doesn't necessarily matter into it, they will sometimes literally jump out inches in front of your car. Or, in my dad's case-

B) They will jump into the side of your car. One slammed into my dad's car *while it was traveling at speed* and farked up the wheel well so bad that the metal was *almost*, but not quite, touching the tire.

I grew up in Western PA, I know the dangers of whitetails, but I don't know many people who hit more than one. Pretend they're really big kids and scan for them in likely areas. They're animals not suicide bombers.

Now birbs. I love birbs, but birbs loved hitting my grill.  I don't miss prying bloody feathers and sometimes sad little sparrow corpses out of the bars. Half the time you didn't even know you'd hit one.


Absolutely wrong. They indeed are pretty much suicide bombers...
 
2018-07-12 06:09:34 AM  

Ruthven13: Absolutely wrong. They indeed are pretty much suicide bombers...


The only thing worse are black angus cattle in the road at night. Can't see them til your on them. Then its too late.
 
2018-07-12 06:59:02 AM  
Maybe it's her favorite jar.
 
2018-07-12 07:53:26 AM  
"Scary"?
 
2018-07-12 09:25:11 AM  
In my 70 some years living and working in rural spaces I have seen deer and other wildlife die slowly in far more horrible ways than dehydration with a jar on your face.

The real world out there us really very rough snowflakes and I hope you don't see it.

Blue tongue and wasting disease knocking the deer in Illinois. In winter I find the carcasses lost by bow hunters.

Now want pictures of puppies and kittens.
 
Juc
2018-07-12 11:18:27 AM  

Nocrash: In my 70 some years living and working in rural spaces I have seen deer and other wildlife die slowly in far more horrible ways than dehydration with a jar on your face.

The real world out there us really very rough snowflakes and I hope you don't see it.

Blue tongue and wasting disease knocking the deer in Illinois. In winter I find the carcasses lost by bow hunters.

Now want pictures of puppies and kittens.


I think a lot of folks are just in denial about how awful nature can be. Nature's beautiful, majestic, disgusting, cruel, awful and awesome all at once.
Most people only think of disney movies when they think of nature though.


i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-12 12:45:38 PM  

Wendigogo: NINEv2: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Suck my balls.

I think I spotted your ride.

[img.fark.net image 384x512]/ I keed


Those were funny like one time. That bumper sticker on the other hand...
 
2018-07-12 02:37:43 PM  

NINEv2: Wendigogo: NINEv2: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Suck my balls.

I think I spotted your ride.

[img.fark.net image 384x512]/ I keed

Those were funny like one time. That bumper sticker on the other hand...


They were never funny to me. Just incredibly tacky and a sure sign that a douchebag was at the wheel.
 
2018-07-12 04:33:53 PM  

Wendigogo: NINEv2: Wendigogo: NINEv2: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Suck my balls.

I think I spotted your ride.

[img.fark.net image 384x512]/ I keed

Those were funny like one time. That bumper sticker on the other hand...

They were never funny to me. Just incredibly tacky and a sure sign that a douchebag was at the wheel.


Usually, yes. Though a friend of mine in college did festively adorn his rusty ol' geo metro with a set. That was rather funny more than once.

/why yes, he was a bit of a douche.
 
2018-07-12 06:05:34 PM  

NINEv2: Wendigogo: NINEv2: Wendigogo: NINEv2: doglover: NINEv2: One less $3K body work bill to my car. Hooved rats.

Learn to drive

Suck my balls.

I think I spotted your ride.

[img.fark.net image 384x512]/ I keed

Those were funny like one time. That bumper sticker on the other hand...

They were never funny to me. Just incredibly tacky and a sure sign that a douchebag was at the wheel.

Usually, yes. Though a friend of mine in college did festively adorn his rusty ol' geo metro with a set. That was rather funny more than once.

/why yes, he was a bit of a douche.


Ok yes, THAT would be hilarious.
 
2018-07-12 06:23:53 PM  
The deer has been freed, BTW, by the California Fish & Wildlife folks. A vet checked it after the jar was removed. The doe is safe.
 
2018-07-12 06:40:38 PM  

Juc: Nocrash: In my 70 some years living and working in rural spaces I have seen deer and other wildlife die slowly in far more horrible ways than dehydration with a jar on your face.

The real world out there us really very rough snowflakes and I hope you don't see it.

Blue tongue and wasting disease knocking the deer in Illinois. In winter I find the carcasses lost by bow hunters.

Now want pictures of puppies and kittens.

I think a lot of folks are just in denial about how awful nature can be. Nature's beautiful, majestic, disgusting, cruel, awful and awesome all at once.
Most people only think of disney movies when they think of nature though.


[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


True. But it's awful and cruel only because we perceive it that way when filtered through our sense of morality and justice. Nature is completely indifferent.
 
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