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(MSN)   Here is a scientific explanation for everyday life. Come for how a power drill can set your house on fire, stay for the amount of force a Lego brick can support   ( msn.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Water, water, author Chris Woodford, Everyday Life Science, high specific heat, water molecules, typical power drill, tall office buildings  
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2265 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Jul 2018 at 11:20 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-07-11 10:33:23 AM  
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2018-07-11 10:33:24 AM  
I've stepped on enough legos over the years to know that they can support at least 200 pounds and whatever I was holding before I dropped it in pain.
 
2018-07-11 11:28:19 AM  
Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room.

As a former Home Depot employee I imagine at least one customer has done that in their house. Some of the people that came into the store I wouldn't have trusted with a cube of Jell-O never mind power tools.
 
2018-07-11 11:29:55 AM  
Well, the water "sticking" to dirt and itself was actually a non-scientific explanation.
 
2018-07-11 11:42:33 AM  
What are the physics that if there is one lego brick in a dark room, it is destined to be stepped on?
 
2018-07-11 11:44:23 AM  
A lego brick is precisely engineered to withstand the exact amount of force required to maximise pain in the human foot, any more than that and it breaks, starting the second, more intense, wave of pain and a hospital visit.

Most people do not push through and stop before the second wave. It is rare to read of anyone doing this.
 
2018-07-11 12:34:22 PM  

OldJames: What are the physics that if there is one lego brick in a dark room, it is destined to be stepped on?


That's meta-physics. And yes.
 
2018-07-11 12:51:42 PM  
"Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.
 
2018-07-11 12:57:04 PM  
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2018-07-11 12:57:32 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.


Yeah, they aren't smart science types...

Take this little nugget, for example:

11. BABIES' BODIES CONTAIN MORE WATER THAN ADULTS.'
Adults are around 60 percent water. By contrast, newborn babies are about 80 percent water. But that percentage quickly drops: A year after birth, kids' water content is down to around 65 percent, according to the USGS.

Babies don't "contain more water than adults", they have a higher percentage of water. If a 200 lb. adult has 65% water weight, that means 130 lbs. of their weight is water. a 10 lb. baby with 80% water weight only holds 8 lbs. of water. 8 is not "more" than 130.
 
2018-07-11 01:00:36 PM  
13. CALORIE COUNTS ARE CALCULATED BY INCINERATING FOOD.

That's because calories are a unit of energy related to heat, you farking morons. It's like being gobsmacked that length is measured by using a ruler.
 
2018-07-11 01:08:38 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.


I've made things out of Santos mahogany...  it burned more than it cut
 
2018-07-11 01:22:48 PM  
FTA: People give off body heat, as anyone who has been trapped in a small crowded room knows. So how many people would it take to warm up your home with just body heat in the winter? About 70 people in motion

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2018-07-11 01:32:20 PM  

Ashelth: ReapTheChaos: "Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.

I've made things out of Santos mahogany...  it burned more than it cut


Santos Mahogany is notorious for it's dulling effect on cutting tools due to its density and interlocked grain. You need a quality blade, and if the project is large, expect to resharpen it a few times over the course of the job.
 
2018-07-11 02:39:34 PM  
If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.
 
2018-07-11 02:56:06 PM  

Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.


True,  but if the drill doesn't bind up, it probably isn't powerful enough to cause friction heat buildup either
 
2018-07-11 02:57:10 PM  

Mikey1969: 13. CALORIE COUNTS ARE CALCULATED BY INCINERATING FOOD.

That's because calories are a unit of energy related to heat, you farking morons. It's like being gobsmacked that length is measured by using a ruler.


Are you a wizard?
 
2018-07-11 03:01:44 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.


This one is very much a "under specific circumstances".  Talking about the pine boards that make up most houses, even with a dull drill bit?  Not a chance.  We have a small computer controlled carving machine here and it was busy cutting through a 10" by 10" by 1" block of pine for 10+ hours yesterday in an enclosed box without any form of cooling.

Hard wood and a very dull bit?  Well, yes.  That's called a fire bow drill and the tech has been around since the neolithic.
 
2018-07-11 03:10:12 PM  
One other I'll call BS on- shrinking skyscrapers.  I'll put serious money that the 1.5mm shrinking from the weight of people during the day is less than a tenth of the thermal expansion of the building as it warms up.
 
2018-07-11 03:18:58 PM  
A drill can start a fire. I witnessed an airport hangar fire triggered by the nicad battery-powered drill chargers.

We spotted the smoke from the air.

"Is that a fire near the airport?"
"THE FIRE IS AT THE AIRPORT."

I landed and parked the plane far away.
 
2018-07-11 04:20:26 PM  
I am the only one who has ever stepped on a Lego. Let me tell you, the pain was so intense that I had to be medevac'd to the nearest induced coma unit. The entire university med school had to come and observe my anomalous injury that put my life in dire jeopardy. After countless surgeries, amputations and robot prosthetics I am finally able to hop to the bathroom.
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2018-07-11 04:38:04 PM  

Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.


If you are drilling in a hole for less than 4 minutes you might want to consult a doctor.
 
2018-07-11 04:55:08 PM  
LEGO or GTFO. I'm not stepping on any imitation blocks!
 
2018-07-11 07:15:15 PM  

montreal_medic: Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.

True,  but if the drill doesn't bind up, it probably isn't powerful enough to cause friction heat buildup either


As mentioned above, the "trick" is you're using a dull bit. Most people have a set of bits and only use a few, so their 7/32" bit is in great shape but the 1/2" bit is so dull it WILL start fires if you push on it.
 
2018-07-11 10:31:12 PM  

ReapTheChaos: In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.


I have some left handed drill bits. More than one fire has been caused by tool borrowers who were not paying attention when they chucked a bit.

/Don't ask me why or where they originally came from
//I just have a big metal box of drill bits
///Three is a magic number
 
2018-07-11 11:18:15 PM  

Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.


I see you've never drilled a pilot hole into concrete.
 
2018-07-12 12:14:05 AM  

thrasherrr: ReapTheChaos: In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.

I have some left handed drill bits. More than one fire has been caused by tool borrowers who were not paying attention when they chucked a bit.

/Don't ask me why or where they originally came from
//I just have a big metal box of drill bits
///Three is a magic number


Left handed bits are a pretty rare item, most people probably don't know they even exist. That being said, you may want to reconsider who you lend your tools to. Anyone with an ounce of common sense should have realized something was wrong and stopped trying long before the bit caused enough friction to start a fire.
 
2018-07-12 03:06:05 AM  
DENSITY EXPLAINS WHY COLD WATER FEELS COLDER THAN AIR AT THE SAME TEMPERATURE.

[stopped_reading_there.bmp]
 
2018-07-12 03:09:43 AM  

CastIronStove: Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.

I see you've never drilled a pilot hole into concrete.


Who the hell drills a pilot hole in concrete?
 
2018-07-12 08:54:04 AM  

CastIronStove: Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.

I see you've never drilled a pilot hole into concrete.


Me: "Dad, you should let that bit cool down before you drill the next hole."
Dad, immediately: BZZZZZZZZZZZRRRRRRT
Bit: "Look at me, I'm a smooth rod now!"

I don't know what the bit was made of but apparently it got hot enough to make it malleable when drilling multiple holes in reinforced concrete. I also don't know why dad thought it was a good idea to keep drilling when the bit came out glowing red.
 
2018-07-12 11:03:47 AM  

Mikey1969: ReapTheChaos: "Assuming a typical power drill uses 750 watts of electricity, and it puts out 750 joules of energy, Woodford calculates that it would take just four minutes to set fire to a wooden wall in a 68°F room."

While I'm no scientist or engineer, I am a machinist by trade and very skilled carpenter to boot, and there's a lot more variables to it than that. Such as size, type and sharpness of the drill bit, rpm of the drill, hardness of the material, and the amount of pressure used.

While I suppose it's possible in theory, you would be hard pressed to find a piece of wood in an average home that would take 4 minutes to drill through. Even the 10" walls of a log cabin wouldn't take 4 minutes to drill through unless you're drilling an unusually large hole or using an exceptionally dull bit.

In fact, the more I think about it, the only way it would even be possible is if you were using a completely dull bit on a very hard wood. Unlike metal, wood doesn't conduct heat very well. As you drill through it, your constantly cutting into cooler material. In order for enough heat to build up it would have to be spinning, but not penetrating, allowing friction to build up on that one particular spot of wood.

Yeah, they aren't smart science types...

Take this little nugget, for example:

11. BABIES' BODIES CONTAIN MORE WATER THAN ADULTS.'
Adults are around 60 percent water. By contrast, newborn babies are about 80 percent water. But that percentage quickly drops: A year after birth, kids' water content is down to around 65 percent, according to the USGS.

Babies don't "contain more water than adults", they have a higher percentage of water. If a 200 lb. adult has 65% water weight, that means 130 lbs. of their weight is water. a 10 lb. baby with 80% water weight only holds 8 lbs. of water. 8 is not "more" than 130.


Thanks for ruining my plans for a baby juicing business, Killjoy.
 
2018-07-12 11:30:28 AM  

turboke: CastIronStove: Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.

I see you've never drilled a pilot hole into concrete.

Me: "Dad, you should let that bit cool down before you drill the next hole."
Dad, immediately: BZZZZZZZZZZZRRRRRRT
Bit: "Look at me, I'm a smooth rod now!"

I don't know what the bit was made of but apparently it got hot enough to make it malleable when drilling multiple holes in reinforced concrete. I also don't know why dad thought it was a good idea to keep drilling when the bit came out glowing red.


STOP!!

Hammerdrill
 
2018-07-12 02:10:07 PM  

studebaker hoch: CastIronStove: Miniac78: If it takes you longer than 4 minutes to drill a hole, you have bigger problems than a potential fire.

I see you've never drilled a pilot hole into concrete.

Who the hell drills a pilot hole in concrete?


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2018-07-12 10:21:15 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Anyone with an ounce of common sense should have realized something was wrong and stopped trying long before the bit caused enough friction to start a fire.


Actual tool users tend to have their own drill bits.  My friends who need to dig through my metal box for a bit are types who, when asked to give you a utility knife at their house, go to the silverware drawer.
 
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