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(BBC-US)   Heatwave unveils ancient settlements in Wales. Still no sign of lost vowels   ( bbc.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Soil, Ditch, long-gone fortification ditches, Wicca, Agriculture, Water, Precipitation, Irrigation  
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1542 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Jul 2018 at 2:35 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-07-10 02:28:07 PM  
namespedia.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-10 02:38:40 PM  
I thought all the vowels missing from Eastern Europe were found in Wales.
 
2018-07-10 02:42:42 PM  
Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.
 
2018-07-10 02:47:09 PM  
Welsh has more vowels than English. You just can't pronounce any of them.
 
2018-07-10 02:55:31 PM  
Do all the ancient settlements look like one particular rock quarry in Cardiff?

/Too obscure even for Fark? Naaaaaaah.
 
2018-07-10 03:01:06 PM  

Bimmer Jones: Do all the ancient settlements look like one particular rock quarry in Cardiff?

/Too obscure even for Fark? Naaaaaaah.


Doctor Who and Hitchhiker?
 
2018-07-10 03:01:08 PM  
shiat. I always confuse which language is all Vowels and which one is all Consonants.

/subby
 
2018-07-10 03:08:14 PM  
I thought that was interesting.

I am a dork, though.
 
2018-07-10 03:14:57 PM  

Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.


You dig in those "crop circles", you will find ruins and artifacts.
 
2018-07-10 03:19:24 PM  

LouisZepher: Doctor Who and Hitchhiker?


Nobody can say you don't know where your towel is.
 
2018-07-10 03:20:30 PM  
Patriarchaeth - GWENNO
Youtube 7W3MPqA1SMg


Gwenno is a Welsh / Cornish singer.  she used to be in a pop-py girl band and then left and did more serious music.  this is from 2016's sublime "Y Dydd Olaf" album, sung entirely in Welsh.  It's based on a 60s sci-fi novel where aliens invade earth and enslave humans.  the only way humans can fight back is by communicating in Welsh, which is the one language the aliens can't crack.

it's a really cool mix of ambient, electronica, and kinda poppy synthesizers.  I love this album even though I can't understand a single word.

/she just released "Le Kov", which similarly, is sung entirely in Cornish.  it's a bit more conventional songs than Olaf but I think both are incredible.  I'm listening now, matter of fact.
 
2018-07-10 03:23:23 PM  

dj495ufj3: Welsh has more vowels than English. You just can't pronounce any of them.


or see 'em
 
2018-07-10 03:27:11 PM  

Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.


You shouldn't be clicking on sites intended for adults if you have the attention span and interests of an 8 year old. Sorry, the real world isn't an Avengers movie for you.
 
2018-07-10 03:56:25 PM  

jaytkay: You shouldn't be clicking on sites intended for adults if you have the attention span and interests of an 8 year old. Sorry, the real world isn't an Avengers movie for you.


Well, shiat! I was hoping Professor Erskine would have that Super Soldier Serum any day now.

/any...day...now...
 
2018-07-10 04:19:53 PM  

the_innkeeper: Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.

You dig in those "crop circles", you will find ruins and artifacts.


That's true of anywhere in Britain.
 
2018-07-10 04:22:56 PM  

WelldeadLink: the_innkeeper: Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.

You dig in those "crop circles", you will find ruins and artifacts.

That's true of anywhere in Britain.


And now we have come full circle...
 
2018-07-10 04:48:46 PM  
Guess those things have been there always and forever.
 
2018-07-10 04:54:36 PM  

jaytkay: Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.

You shouldn't be clicking on sites intended for adults if you have the attention span and interests of an 8 year old. Sorry, the real world isn't an Avengers movie for you.


I think that's unfair to 8 year olds.

If smart kids didn't see stuff like this and let their imaginations light up, we wouldn't have archaeologists.
 
2018-07-10 04:57:46 PM  

WelldeadLink: the_innkeeper: Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.

You dig in those "crop circles", you will find ruins and artifacts.

That's true of anywhere in Britain.


Perhaps; the British and Irish Isles have been settled since like, forever, sure.

But archaeology has to start somewhere; one does not simply randomly dig to find historical sites. Aerial photography, like in TFA, is an important way to do research before sending in geophys teams, and actually breaking ground.

/I'm having random flashbacks to both Time Team and The Detectorists as I compose this post.
 
2018-07-10 04:59:56 PM  

iron de havilland: The Detectorists


The what?

Hey, the series is free over here on Amazon. I will check that out.
 
2018-07-10 05:03:05 PM  

jaytkay: iron de havilland: The Detectorists

The what?

Hey, the series is free over here on Amazon. I will check that out.


Worth a watch. Mackenzie Crook and Toby Jones just doing a kind of buddy sitcom based around their love of metal detecting. Not sure if it's just too British for many American tastes, but I know there at least a couple of Farkers, other than me, who are in to it.
 
2018-07-10 06:13:13 PM  

iron de havilland: WelldeadLink: the_innkeeper: Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.

You dig in those "crop circles", you will find ruins and artifacts.

That's true of anywhere in Britain.

Perhaps; the British and Irish Isles have been settled since like, forever, sure.

But archaeology has to start somewhere; one does not simply randomly dig to find historical sites. Aerial photography, like in TFA, is an important way to do research before sending in geophys teams, and actually breaking ground.

/I'm having random flashbacks to both Time Team and The Detectorists as I compose this post.


Ont he other hand, running a metal detector over what is basically a random field can sometimes result in one of the biggest archeological finds in British history.
 
2018-07-10 06:37:52 PM  
I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves". Looking all over the area, I found an air base that hit 87 on July 1, but at the time, the humidity was 35%, so the heat index was 86 degrees.

On contrast, we regularly hit between 95 and 100 degrees and it's just "summer". Our humidity is lower, but we still don't scream about a "heatwave" until it climbs above about 105 for more than a week or so, and the heat index is still higher than that 86 degrees. Phoenix? Yeah, they hit like 115 degrees and it's just another day. "Heatwaves" don't really get mentioned there.
 
2018-07-10 06:52:38 PM  

Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves". Looking all over the area, I found an air base that hit 87 on July 1, but at the time, the humidity was 35%, so the heat index was 86 degrees.

On contrast, we regularly hit between 95 and 100 degrees and it's just "summer". Our humidity is lower, but we still don't scream about a "heatwave" until it climbs above about 105 for more than a week or so, and the heat index is still higher than that 86 degrees. Phoenix? Yeah, they hit like 115 degrees and it's just another day. "Heatwaves" don't really get mentioned there.


It is almost like the weather is different in different places. Huh.
 
2018-07-10 07:10:27 PM  

rickythepenguin: the only way humans can fight back is by communicating in Welsh Navajo.

 
2018-07-10 07:28:29 PM  

dywed88: Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves". Looking all over the area, I found an air base that hit 87 on July 1, but at the time, the humidity was 35%, so the heat index was 86 degrees.

On contrast, we regularly hit between 95 and 100 degrees and it's just "summer". Our humidity is lower, but we still don't scream about a "heatwave" until it climbs above about 105 for more than a week or so, and the heat index is still higher than that 86 degrees. Phoenix? Yeah, they hit like 115 degrees and it's just another day. "Heatwaves" don't really get mentioned there.

It is almost like the weather is different in different places. Huh.


No, it's almost like people in the UK are drama queens. I mean, God forbid someone pulls out a butter knife, it['s like national news.
 
2018-07-10 10:19:43 PM  

Meatsim1: Wow that was kind of a let down, just a bunch of crop circles.  I mean yeah history is interesting but come on, so many people crammed into Britain over thousands and thousands of years, that some of them dug a ditch in this specific spot isn't that interesting.  Call me when you find some actual artifacts and ruins.


Watch an episode of Time Team for goodness sake.  They see features from the air during a drought, use some sort of electromagnetic thingy to map out the disturbed soil in greater detail, then dig a few trenches placed to intersect what they hope are walls or ditches, and see what they find.  Sometimes they set out to excavate a Roman fort, and find a bunch of stone age stuff instead.
 
2018-07-11 12:56:29 AM  

Mikey1969: dywed88: Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves". Looking all over the area, I found an air base that hit 87 on July 1, but at the time, the humidity was 35%, so the heat index was 86 degrees.

On contrast, we regularly hit between 95 and 100 degrees and it's just "summer". Our humidity is lower, but we still don't scream about a "heatwave" until it climbs above about 105 for more than a week or so, and the heat index is still higher than that 86 degrees. Phoenix? Yeah, they hit like 115 degrees and it's just another day. "Heatwaves" don't really get mentioned there.

It is almost like the weather is different in different places. Huh.

No, it's almost like people in the UK are drama queens. I mean, God forbid someone pulls out a butter knife, it['s like national news.


Or, someone pulling a knife is national news, because they aren't inundated by gun violence and no one bothers with a blade because what is a knife going to do.

It's a different culture, and no one accused the Scots of ever living in a tropical paradise.

FFS, they aren't used to the heat, and their housing is not used to the heat, and that adds up. Live in Adak all your life, then move to Orlando, with no air conditioning. See how you deal.
 
2018-07-11 05:03:58 AM  

Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves". Looking all over the area, I found an air base that hit 87 on July 1, but at the time, the humidity was 35%, so the heat index was 86 degrees.


Good. Now, compare that to a typical year.

This has been the hottest summer in the UK since 1976, probably.

Personally, I wasn't born then, the hottest summer I remember from my lifetime would be 1995, and I'm not sure temperature records were being broken then as they have been this year.

There were a couple of rain showers where I am last weekend, I couldn't tell you when it last rained before that. My aunt is a very keen gardener, and as of a couple of weeks ago, she hadn't had any rain since the end of May.

The ground is tinder dry, in the local news there are reports of gorse/brush fires in the hills every other day or so; yesterday's was about a bunch of kids trying to start a fire in a local wood, but I guess it was easier to control than some of them because the shade of the wood has prevented the forest floor from completely drying out.

This is not normal. The UK is a temperate, Atlantic climate. Most years we have maybe a week or so like this, and the rest just kind of usually drizzly Atlantic weather.

Read TFA, ffs. The ground is dry enough that archaeological features are visible that have never been seen before in modern times.

On contrast, we regularly hit between 95 and 100 degrees and it's just "summer". Our humidity is lower, but we still don't scream about a "heatwave" until it climbs above about 105 for more than a week or so, and the heat index is still higher than that 86 degrees. Phoenix? Yeah, they hit like 115 degrees and it's just another day. "Heatwaves" don't really get mentioned there.

And what is the weather usually like there at this time of year? Is that unusual for those places? Are people prepared for that with houses designed for that climate? Does everyone have aircon?

A lot of it's just what you're used to. But this, so far, has probably been the UK's hottest summer in 42 years. That is notable.
 
2018-07-11 05:08:28 AM  
Just as an aside. Thought occured to me after walking my dogs t'other day. Now, they both had a good guddle in the river to cool down, and after the walk and getting back to the house, they were still peching for 20-30 minutes after. How the hell do dogs cope with living in the hellhole temperatures that some farkers like to boast about?

I mean, particularly the sorts of dogs like German shepherds, who have double coats, but really any kind of dog. Do they need regular haircuts to keep their coats short, so they don't just die in the heat outside, or, like their owners, do they just acclimatise to the conditions?
 
2018-07-11 07:59:35 AM  

Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves".


as folks mentioned, different places, different weather patterns.  I lived in Seattle about 20 years ago.  They had a heat wave, red cross types were setting up "cool shelters" and giving out fans.  it was 85, zero humidity.  I laughed as I had just come from 95+ with 100% humidity, so it felt 105+.

Then I realized most houses/apartments didn't have AC as the climate up there generally didn't require AC.
 
2018-07-11 10:56:24 AM  

toetag: Mikey1969: I don't understand these people and their "heatwaves".

as folks mentioned, different places, different weather patterns.  I lived in Seattle about 20 years ago.  They had a heat wave, red cross types were setting up "cool shelters" and giving out fans.  it was 85, zero humidity.  I laughed as I had just come from 95+ with 100% humidity, so it felt 105+.

Then I realized most houses/apartments didn't have AC as the climate up there generally didn't require AC.


85 is when I start counting down the time until I can open the windows(Usually open them when it gets around 77 or so). 75 is when you start feeling like summer is here. That means a grand total of 10 degrees sends people into a panic. 10 degrees. That's silly. We have a greater span between daytime high and nighttime lows. It will be 95 during the day and 70 at night. 25 degrees, I think people should be able to handle 10.

I also laugh at people who flip their shiat because it's going to be less than 30 on a winter's day here. We're getting ridiculously soft. These people don't need to be able to handle 115 degrees, but 85 is not a heat wave.
 
2018-07-11 11:42:25 AM  

iron de havilland: This is not normal. The UK is a temperate, Atlantic climate. Most years we have maybe a week or so like this, and the rest just kind of usually drizzly Atlantic weather...

A lot of it's just what you're used to. But this , so far, has probably been the UK's hottest summer in 42 years. That is notable.


1995 was hotter, and part of a sequence of hot Summers. 2018 is more of a drought than a heatwave, and comes after a series of fairly poor Summers. This exact same story ran back then, and a couple of major discoveries were made.
 
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