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(The Hollywood Reporter)   Broadway squeezes the life out of Spongebob Squarepants   (hollywoodreporter.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Tony Award nominations, Tony Award, Nickelodeon stage venture, long-running Nickelodeon cartoon, Palace Theatre, Musical theatre, The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie, terrific Broadway debut  
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1793 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 09 Jul 2018 at 8:50 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-07-09 08:45:25 AM  
I like Bob Fosse.
 
2018-07-09 08:53:31 AM  
Who lives in a pineapple off of Broadway. SpongeBob SquarePants!
 
2018-07-09 09:21:12 AM  

668NeighborOfTheBeast: Who lives in a pineapple off of Broadway. SpongeBob SquarePants!


And never getta Tony
Spongebob SquarePants!
 
2018-07-09 09:26:12 AM  
Are you suggesting an audience that seeks to be seen as "cultured" wouldn't be caught dead at the critically-acclaimed spinoff of a children's cartoon show?

To be fair, the entire second Act is essentially Spongebob attacking the fanbase for criticizing the decline of the show, I can kind of understand why it's not winning over the hardcores.  They even bring in a new character to do this, Nautilus Neckbeard, and every time he says "the show sucks now", either Spongebob or Patrick hit the guy over the head with a massive spatula.

The most impressive part of all of this is that it's clear the actor for Nautilus is doing his own stunts, and in order to make the attack look convincing, he just flops downward face first as the spatula smashes him into the ground.  I'm not joking here, this thing looks like it weighs a couple of hundred pounds.

But nevermind that, I really don't care if the actor gets hurt, you play an asshole neckbeard, as far as I'm concerned, you become one.  And if you say even a single bad word about any media property that I personally enjoy, you are a tryhard and you deserve to be exiled from society.

Sorry you hardcores can't handle the truth, which is that The Simpsons is as good as it's ever been, lol.
 
2018-07-09 09:29:58 AM  
I never thought there would be much of an overlap on the Venn diagram of people who are willing to shell out a couple hundred bucks per ticket and people clamoring to see a SpongeBob SquarePants musical.

Now the Aqua Teen Hunger Force musical? That's gonna knock that smug, little Hamilton of its high horse.
 
2018-07-09 10:05:19 AM  
i1.wp.comView Full Size
 
2018-07-09 10:06:10 AM  

gunga galunga: I never thought there would be much of an overlap on the Venn diagram of people who are willing to shell out a couple hundred bucks per ticket and people clamoring to see a SpongeBob SquarePants musical.

Now the Aqua Teen Hunger Force musical? That's gonna knock that smug, little Hamilton of its high horse.


I don't need a Broadway musical to know how to ROCK!
 
2018-07-09 10:10:07 AM  
The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.
 
2018-07-09 10:33:36 AM  

peterquince: Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world.


Art is sequenced by its intelligibility. The more natural and prosaic the form, the lower it is. Hence most movies.

The more abstract, foreign, and unintelligible, the higher brow it is -- like high-fashion, or Noh.

Theater is low-to-middle-brow. Opera sits above it.
 
2018-07-09 10:33:55 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

BroADwaY sQueEzeS thE lIFE ouT Of SpONgeBoB SqAREpANts
 
2018-07-09 10:49:25 AM  

This text is now purple: peterquince: Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world.

Art is sequenced by its intelligibility. The more natural and prosaic the form, the lower it is. Hence most movies.

The more abstract, foreign, and unintelligible, the higher brow it is -- like high-fashion, or Noh.

Theater is low-to-middle-brow. Opera sits above it.


I don't disagree with any of that. But there's definite overlap. The current production of Carousel, which features Renee Fleming, would probably be more in the high-art category (and in fact opera houses will produce shows like Carousel from time to time). Or like...that Baz Luhman production of La Boheme that was on Broadway was probably lower-art than a comparable production at the Met.

But I *do* think that folks who are more removed from the performing arts world differentiate it differently. I went to law school in central Illinois. The local theater company differentiated between shows that were on Broadway ("good") and shows that were not on Broadway ("irrelevant"). I suspect that that's not an uncommon differentiation, and I suspect that lots of drama teachers are going to be using that logic when they pitch this show for their school's spring musical.
 
2018-07-09 10:51:34 AM  
csb:

When the Countess and I were in NYC last November, they were practically trying to give Spongebob tickets away around the TKTS booth. We passed - we didn't come to NYC to see a play based on a cartoon Nickelodeon seems to air 20 hours a day.

Two weeks later, we saw the performance at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. To our surprise and slight horror, we found it fun. I looked up to see who wrote the music, and saw the list of musicians that contributed songs. We felt like members of the Bluth family for a moment - as theatre geeks, we knew we made a huge mistake.

/end csb
 
2018-07-09 10:52:06 AM  

peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.


My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.
 
2018-07-09 10:58:44 AM  

Ker_Thwap: peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.

My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.


100% agree with you. I LOVED my time performing in and seeing those shows. I promise I'm not shiatting on them at all. I just really want to see us promoting (and them tackling) more meaningful shows like a "Bridges of Madison County" or a "Once" than a "Spongebob" or a "Margaritaville", which were created by marketing departments to expand the brand experience.
 
2018-07-09 11:06:16 AM  
Directed by Tina Landau with a book by Kyle Jarrow, the show's score is made up of original songs by artists from across the popular music spectrum, including Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith, Sara Bareilles, The Flaming Lips, Lady Antebellum, Cyndi Lauper, John Legend, Panic! At the Disco, Plain White T's, They Might Be Giants and T.I.

You did kinda miss one more semi-famous person who wrote a number for this show, mr Hollywood Reporter, ayoung, up-and comer named DAVID FARKING BOWIE.
 
2018-07-09 11:10:41 AM  

Count_Crackula: csb:

When the Countess and I were in NYC last November, they were practically trying to give Spongebob tickets away around the TKTS booth. We passed - we didn't come to NYC to see a play based on a cartoon Nickelodeon seems to air 20 hours a day.

Two weeks later, we saw the performance at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. To our surprise and slight horror, we found it fun. I looked up to see who wrote the music, and saw the list of musicians that contributed songs. We felt like members of the Bluth family for a moment - as theatre geeks, we knew we made a huge mistake.

/end csb


If it makes you feel any better, my Actor son, who is a\now a GIGANTIC  Hamilton fan, so much so that he bought his mom and himself tickets to see the show ...for $700...1,000 miles away in Chicago.... for Christmas....had a chance to see it for free when it wasn't yet on Broadway because the premise of the show seemed SO absurd...
 
2018-07-09 11:17:14 AM  

Magorn: Count_Crackula: csb:

When the Countess and I were in NYC last November, they were practically trying to give Spongebob tickets away around the TKTS booth. We passed - we didn't come to NYC to see a play based on a cartoon Nickelodeon seems to air 20 hours a day.

Two weeks later, we saw the performance at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. To our surprise and slight horror, we found it fun. I looked up to see who wrote the music, and saw the list of musicians that contributed songs. We felt like members of the Bluth family for a moment - as theatre geeks, we knew we made a huge mistake.

/end csb

If it makes you feel any better, my Actor son, who is a\now a GIGANTIC  Hamilton fan, so much so that he bought his mom and himself tickets to see the show ...for $700...1,000 miles away in Chicago.... for Christmas....had a chance to see it for free when it wasn't yet on Broadway because the premise of the show seemed SO absurd...


UGH. I did that with both Hamilton (a friend was in the show) and The Producers.
 
2018-07-09 11:18:07 AM  

This text is now purple: Art is sequenced by its intelligibility. The more natural and prosaic the form, the lower it is. Hence most movies.

The more abstract, foreign, and unintelligible, the higher brow it is -- like high-fashion, or Noh.


I don't know if you heard me scream internally, but you can be assured that I did it.
 
2018-07-09 11:47:00 AM  

Mike_LowELL: Are you suggesting an audience that seeks to be seen as "cultured" wouldn't be caught dead at the critically-acclaimed spinoff of a children's cartoon show?

To be fair, the entire second Act is essentially Spongebob attacking the fanbase for criticizing the decline of the show, I can kind of understand why it's not winning over the hardcores.  They even bring in a new character to do this, Nautilus Neckbeard, and every time he says "the show sucks now", either Spongebob or Patrick hit the guy over the head with a massive spatula.

The most impressive part of all of this is that it's clear the actor for Nautilus is doing his own stunts, and in order to make the attack look convincing, he just flops downward face first as the spatula smashes him into the ground.  I'm not joking here, this thing looks like it weighs a couple of hundred pounds.

But nevermind that, I really don't care if the actor gets hurt, you play an asshole neckbeard, as far as I'm concerned, you become one.  And if you say even a single bad word about any media property that I personally enjoy, you are a tryhard and you deserve to be exiled from society.

Sorry you hardcores can't handle the truth, which is that The Simpsons is as good as it's ever been, lol.


That's so punk rock!
 
2018-07-09 12:14:20 PM  

This text is now purple: peterquince: Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world.

Art is sequenced by its intelligibility. The more natural and prosaic the form, the lower it is. Hence most movies.

The more abstract, foreign, and unintelligible, the higher brow it is -- like high-fashion, or Noh.

Theater is low-to-middle-brow. Opera sits above it.


Have you ever actually followed the plot of an opera? You kidding? That's why they had to nickname them "soap operas," that wasn't a coincidence.

/the music is purdy
 
2018-07-09 12:41:24 PM  

peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. T


Not much of a theatre guy and I had no idea what to expect when my sister got all of us preview tickets.  Took the kids, made a day out of it, and had a blast.  It was not what I was expecting at all and it was very well done and entertaining.  Glad I got to see it before it shuts down.
 
2018-07-09 12:41:28 PM  

Trocadero: This text is now purple: peterquince: Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world.

Art is sequenced by its intelligibility. The more natural and prosaic the form, the lower it is. Hence most movies.

The more abstract, foreign, and unintelligible, the higher brow it is -- like high-fashion, or Noh.

Theater is low-to-middle-brow. Opera sits above it.

Have you ever actually followed the plot of an opera? You kidding? That's why they had to nickname them "soap operas," that wasn't a coincidence.

/the music is purdy


The 50% that are the same general stories shakespeare told arent bad if you know that.
 
2018-07-09 01:11:26 PM  

Trocadero: Have you ever actually followed the plot of an opera? You kidding? That's why they had to nickname them "soap operas," that wasn't a coincidence.

/the music is purdy


User name checks out.

Kind of. Opera started off low-brow, until they insisted on doing them in foreign languages to class 'em up. Otherwise it's just musical theatre.

\I've sat through Russian plays, in Russian.
\\Pratfalls are a universal language
 
2018-07-09 01:43:23 PM  

peterquince: Ker_Thwap: peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.

My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.

100% agree with you. I LOVED my time performing in and seeing those shows. I promise I'm not shiatting on them at all. I just really want to see us promoting (and them tackling) more meaningful shows like a "Bridges of Madison County" or a "Once" than a "Spongebob" or a "Margaritaville", which were created by marketing departments to expand the brand experience.


Blame Disney and Legally Blonde for the current situation on Broadway.  Most shows that make money these days are based on established properties because theatergoers tend to default to characters and stories they recognize, along with shows that have big names attached like Lin Manuel Miranda for Hamilton or Monty Python for Spamalot, rather than take a chance on something new.  Just look at the Tony nominations for Best Musical since 2010.

In terms of local musical productions...egh.  My problem is that there are certain definitive performances I've either heard a million times on cast albums or in person.  It can be fun to see a young up and comer make an effort at those, but I'll always ending up comparing the two and it'll always be kind of disappointing.

Plays, on the other hand, I absolutely love seeing locally.  There's nothing quite like being in a shoebox theater with the actors close enough to have spittle hitting your face.
 
2018-07-09 01:43:45 PM  
This thread reminded me of this:
img.fark.netView Full Size
(sorry for quality)
 
2018-07-09 01:54:42 PM  

Outshined_One: peterquince: Ker_Thwap: peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.

My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.

100% agree with you. I LOVED my time performing in and seeing those shows. I promise I'm not shiatting on them at all. I just really want to see us promoting (and them tackling) more meaningful shows like a "Bridges of Madison County" or a "Once" than a "Spongebob" or a "Margaritaville", which were created by marketing departments to expand the brand experience.

Blame Disney and Legally Blonde for the current situation on Broadway.  Most shows that make money these days are based on established properties because theatergoers tend to default to characters and stories they recognize, along with shows that have big names attached like Lin Manuel Miranda for Hamilton or Monty Python for Spamalot, rather than take a chance on something new.  Just look at the Tony nominations for Best Musical since 2010.

In terms of local musical productions...egh.  My problem is that there are certain def ...


My only quibble here (just for the sake of discussion) is that Lin Manuel Miranda only became a name *because* of Hamilton - his last show, Bring It On! the musical was a total commercial disaster.

I 100% agree with you about Legally Blonde, and I think we have to go back even a bit further to Mamma Mia! in 1997, though certainly there was crap on Broadway way before that, and many of the shows relied on vegas-style dancing girls that thankfully have (mostly) gone out of fashion. Disney can go either way. The Lion King is stunning and I would argue its a great example of creating "high art" for mass audiences, which I love (and would love to see community theaters tackling that kind of puppetry!), but then they put up crap like The Little Mermaid and Tarzan which I'd put in the same category as Spongebob.

I realize that I'm kind of hogging the conversation here. I don't mean to be forcing my views on anyone. I just find this topic really interesting.
 
2018-07-09 01:59:53 PM  

Outshined_One: Blame Disney and Legally Blonde for the current situation on Broadway. Most shows that make money these days are based on established properties because theatergoers tend to default to characters and stories they recognize, along with shows that have big names attached like Lin Manuel Miranda for Hamilton or Monty Python for Spamalot, rather than take a chance on something new. Just look at the Tony nominations for Best Musical since 2010.


It's older than that. If you go through the best selling Broadway plays, almost every one is an adaptation or remake.

Hell, even Cats.
 
2018-07-09 02:34:49 PM  

peterquince: Outshined_One: peterquince: Ker_Thwap: peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.

My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.

100% agree with you. I LOVED my time performing in and seeing those shows. I promise I'm not shiatting on them at all. I just really want to see us promoting (and them tackling) more meaningful shows like a "Bridges of Madison County" or a "Once" than a "Spongebob" or a "Margaritaville", which were created by marketing departments to expand the brand experience.

Blame Disney and Legally Blonde for the current situation on Broadway.  Most shows that make money these days are based on established properties because theatergoers tend to default to characters and stories they recognize, along with shows that have big names attached like Lin Manuel Miranda for Hamilton or Monty Python for Spamalot, rather than take a chance on something new.  Just look at the Tony nominations for Best Musical since 2010.

In terms of local musical productions...egh.  My problem is that there are certain def ...

My only quibble here (just for the sake of discussion) is that Lin Manuel Miranda only became a name *because* of Hamilton - his last show, Bring It On! the musical was a total commercial disaster.


Miranda first hit it big with In the Heights.  Granted, Hamilton made him a megastar, but he was a known commodity.
 
2018-07-09 02:39:54 PM  

Outshined_One: Miranda first hit it big with In the Heights. Granted, Hamilton made him a megastar, but he was a known commodity.


Yeah, but his name wasn't enough to guarantee box office success. If it were, his other show Bring it On! would have been less commercially disastrous.
 
2018-07-09 04:01:54 PM  
I just don't get why the characters just look like humans in outfits that are the same colors as the characters in the cartoon, but Squidward has 4 legs. Spongebob looks nothing like a sponge, or a square.
 
2018-07-09 05:47:53 PM  

peterquince: Outshined_One: Miranda first hit it big with In the Heights. Granted, Hamilton made him a megastar, but he was a known commodity.

Yeah, but his name wasn't enough to guarantee box office success. If it were, his other show Bring it On! would have been less commercially disastrous.


It is interesting that his two hits were originals and the flop is an adaptation of a movie.

BTW, Pretty Woman The Musical starts previews July 20.
/eyeroll
 
2018-07-09 08:38:57 PM  

Outshined_One: peterquince: Ker_Thwap: peterquince: The theatre folks I know really enjoy this show. They describe it as really imaginative escapism. Also there are 28 confetti cannons at the end of the show. I can't say I'm sorry to see it go though. I absolutely hate this trend of Broadway turning into little more than branded content.

Whether it's true or not, I think most people in this country consider Broadway to be the pinnacle of Theatrical Art (snooty nose implied), on par with the great opera houses of the world. And shows that run on Broadway not only tour, but are recreated by smaller companies across the US because, after all, they were on Broadway, they must be good! And I hate the idea that 20 or 30 years from now people will have an excuse to present this as Art to their small-town audiences.

My recent Broadway experiences have been obviously exhausted cast members, mailing in performances because they've done them 100s of times before.  I like my local summer theater.  A bunch of college kids trying their best, and sometimes a ringer if the lead singing is technically difficult.

100% agree with you. I LOVED my time performing in and seeing those shows. I promise I'm not shiatting on them at all. I just really want to see us promoting (and them tackling) more meaningful shows like a "Bridges of Madison County" or a "Once" than a "Spongebob" or a "Margaritaville", which were created by marketing departments to expand the brand experience.

Blame Disney and Legally Blonde for the current situation on Broadway.  Most shows that make money these days are based on established properties because theatergoers tend to default to characters and stories they recognize, along with shows that have big names attached like Lin Manuel Miranda for Hamilton or Monty Python for Spamalot, rather than take a chance on something new.  Just look at the Tony nominations for Best Musical since 2010.

In terms of local musical productions...egh.  My problem is that there are certain def ...


See the thing is, I can totally understand why people would default to the "known" commodity. Broadway is really expensive. Even going during Broadway Week or using the TKTS line, Broadway is an expensive day. Because of that, I want to lessen the risk that I won't like the show and have "wasted" my money, so I go with what I know I like.

That being sad, two of the last few shows I've seen were Matilda and Aladdin, and I was thoroughly underwhelmed by both.

I'm hoping to see Come From Away at some point this summer if I can find tickets at about $100.
 
2018-07-09 10:07:36 PM  
Shame. I got to preview the soundtrack from NPR streaming it and loved it. Wife has promised me we'll get tickets if it tours.
 
2018-07-09 10:48:47 PM  

SuburbanCowboy: I just don't get why the characters just look like humans in outfits that are the same colors as the characters in the cartoon, but Squidward has 4 legs. Spongebob looks nothing like a sponge, or a square.


harderfaster.netView Full Size
 
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