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(Slate)   "Anxiety makes me a better employee"   ( slate.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Anxiety, anxiety, Psychology, Fear, clinical anxiety, anxiety disorder, anxious workers, well-managed anxiety  
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1426 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Jul 2018 at 11:29 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-07-08 08:35:10 AM  
Anxiety makes me a better employee rube
 
2018-07-08 08:46:59 AM  
there's about half a dozen ways I can think off that can go wrong, and that's without even thinking very hard.
 
2018-07-08 11:29:39 AM  
A little anxiety is a natural motivator.  The issue is when it overwhelms everything else.
 
2018-07-08 11:38:30 AM  
hyperventilating and crying helps be more productive...
 
2018-07-08 11:49:21 AM  

pueblonative: Anxiety makes me a better employee rube


Wage slave.
 
2018-07-08 12:12:18 PM  
Imagine a world in which workers are fairly. Compensated for the value of their labor. Then what?

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


What does that get us? A discontented, lazy rabble instead of a thrifty, working class. And all because a few starry-eyed dreamers like Peter Bailey stir them up and fill their heads with a lot of impossible ideas.
 
2018-07-08 12:14:07 PM  
The coke gives her anxiety, which makes her a better employee.  So she can earn more money.  So she can buy more coke...
 
2018-07-08 12:14:39 PM  
I'd say my anxious and neurotic tendencies are a benefit to my employer. I live by the motto that i'm only as good as what I've done today, and work my ass off to deliver results that are up to my, and their standards. I'm terrified of not having a job, and that plays a part in my willingness to go to great lengths to stay in my career.

I wish this wasn't the case, but i learned long ago that I can't shake the fear of what could happen were I to not be this way.
 
2018-07-08 12:27:02 PM  
You know who else benefits from anxiety? Serial killers, it makes them more conscientious.
 
2018-07-08 12:40:34 PM  

phedex: I'd say my anxious and neurotic tendencies are a benefit to my employer. I live by the motto that i'm only as good as what I've done today, and work my ass off to deliver results that are up to my, and their standards. I'm terrified of not having a job, and that plays a part in my willingness to go to great lengths to stay in my career.

I wish this wasn't the case, but i learned long ago that I can't shake the fear of what could happen were I to not be this way.


Alright, I've had enough of the whining. You're fired!
 
2018-07-08 12:51:54 PM  
I am annoyed that the article doesn't cover the fact that chronically anxious people are very risk adverse.

In every job I have ever had the tolerance for uncompensated risk (risk that doesn't correlate with higher opportunity for return) was way way too high?

Are we in danger of violating export law because some mouthbreather left classified information in a document marked Unclassified?  NAH we don't need to re-review the document.

Is our risk mitigation software being abused and allows for pants on head stupid risk valuation on equities that are much riskier than someone fat fingered into the model? Not our fault! Its the user's decisions.

Should we let a customer dictate when and how they pass us millions of records of data without signing a consistency clause into their delivery contract?  No, we don't want to anger our paying customers.

As someone who struggles with anxiety I have been telling the "cool kids" to get down off that rusty piece of playground equipment my entire damn life.

Its what I bring to the equation, I turn chaos and dumpster fires into stable operating systems.  And yet this whinefest didn't even point out that the anxious are really good at risk awareness.

BLEARGGGGGG
 
2018-07-08 12:56:51 PM  

Harry Wagstaff: hyperventilating and crying helps be more productive...


Just do it in your own cubicle, not mine.
 
2018-07-08 01:02:06 PM  
My boss has an anxiety disorder and she sucks at her job. In fairness, I think that's because of her lack of requisite skills rather her anxiety.
 
2018-07-08 01:41:21 PM  

Chevello: Harry Wagstaff: hyperventilating and crying helps be more productive...

Just do it in your own cubicle, not mine.


Welcome to the open office munechacho(sp?), ain't no where to hide from these helpless fractured people now!

/I am in an open office but we're setup with lots of hardware around us while we're testing it out.  I keep a bank of servers at ready to turn on if I need some strong white noise to either encourage a conversation to go elsewhere or remind people how stupid it was to put so many of us in a single big open space.
 
2018-07-08 01:46:00 PM  
Stress - Jim's Big Ego (Dr. Demento's 30th Anniversary Collection: Dementia 2000)
Youtube AEu78VeGzCM
 
2018-07-08 02:40:13 PM  
Mentioned it already, still holds ground.  Of course they'd want such people.  If one is troubled so easily, it simply means they are a pushover, and be easily bullied into doing whatever

Those able, confident enough to stand alone in handling affairs or questioning stupid means won't further stupid objectives.  They would expect better than status quo

both sides of the fence have their appeals, imo.  Wouldn't necessarily disparage either
 
2018-07-08 02:42:23 PM  

Sugarbombs: The coke gives her anxiety, which makes her a better employee.  So she can earn more money.  So she can buy more coke...


J'fais d'la poudre
Pour travailler plus
Pour faire plus d'argent
Pour faire plus de poudre.
 
2018-07-08 02:43:05 PM  
Not being an employee frees me from most causes of anxiety.
 
2018-07-08 03:08:22 PM  
I have a boss that loves little sadistic tricks like:

"I need you to come to my office"... and they never say what it's about. Could be they need me to change something minor on something insignificant, which could have been done over the phone or by email... or it could be "you've been on double-secret probation for a month and I'm writing you up for an imaginary infraction I have no proof of, but HR automatically believes anything I say so you're farked."

The techniques mentioned in TFA are helpful and work.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques are useful for anybody, in any situation, but especially when you're an imaginative person faced with a boss from hell. It helps you to get out of a spiral of guessing what evil comes next and building up a huge anxiety over it.
 
2018-07-08 03:58:24 PM  

Splinthar: I am annoyed that the article doesn't cover the fact that chronically anxious people are very risk adverse.

In every job I have ever had the tolerance for uncompensated risk (risk that doesn't correlate with higher opportunity for return) was way way too high?

Are we in danger of violating export law because some mouthbreather left classified information in a document marked Unclassified?  NAH we don't need to re-review the document.

Is our risk mitigation software being abused and allows for pants on head stupid risk valuation on equities that are much riskier than someone fat fingered into the model? Not our fault! Its the user's decisions.

Should we let a customer dictate when and how they pass us millions of records of data without signing a consistency clause into their delivery contract?  No, we don't want to anger our paying customers.

As someone who struggles with anxiety I have been telling the "cool kids" to get down off that rusty piece of playground equipment my entire damn life.

Its what I bring to the equation, I turn chaos and dumpster fires into stable operating systems.  And yet this whinefest didn't even point out that the anxious are really good at risk awareness.

BLEARGGGGGG


This!  As soon as I'm presented with anything remotely unexpected or that I haven't done before my immediate visceral response is "no!".  My brain then starts constructing a 1000 justifications for having made that response because clearly it must have come from somewhere.

I get to sort through the giant list of things that could go wrong or situations for which I'm unprepared or reasons I don't want to and decide which if any of them of them are remotely legitimate before deciding "sure, Subway sounds good for lunch today"

This can be useful when I can harness that for some new project and turn that "no" into "ok, but first we need to first test x, y, and z to make sure that q doesn't happen, we'll need to learn more about w, and we should probably warn people that they might experience v".
 
2018-07-08 04:00:44 PM  
If you had actually "developed coping mechanisms ", then you would just be a person and you wouldn't be clinging to your excuse label.
You are, so you didn't, so you're not worth hiring.
 
2018-07-08 05:42:53 PM  
Chronically anxious people are high risk for mental fatigue and coronary issues. So you work harder/faster, and die WAY earlier.
 
TWX
2018-07-08 06:55:08 PM  

Splinthar: I am annoyed that the article doesn't cover the fact that chronically anxious people are very risk adverse.


Yep. I spent a decade working for a terrible lead at my employer. Unfortunately the active and long-term retirement benefits are far too good to make leaving easy, and everywhere else I've ever worked has gone out of business. The lead that I worked for was an idiot that actually realized he wasn't capable, and thus he both enforced everyone working down to the weakest person so no one stood-out as being so good as to being a threat to him, and he gave himself the best assignments or all of the assignments that put staff into contacts with upper management so that they didn't realize how bad he was either, no one else to compare to. Among his techniques were to make employees think that they were at risk of being let go, to penalize employees that managed their workload efficiently enough to end up with downtime during the afternoons by giving them literal no-benefit busy-work, and to do things like force employees that he didn't like to change desks, change computers for simply a different unit of the same model, change work vehicles, turn-in work-provided tools without readily exchanging, etc.

I had strongly considered quitting, but on hitting a decade I was going to be 100% vested with employer-matching contributions to the retirement plan, so at year eight it was better to remain for the last two. Then during that eighth year I discovered that if I stopped just taking his abuse and literally yelled back in front of other coworkers that he cowed and caved. Made that year and a half or so a lot more tolerable, and then close to year ten I got a different position, no longer working for this asshole, still with the company.

Now, that decade has arguably left me scarred. Despite consistently high employee performance reviews I have to consistently remind myself when some decision goes contrary to me or when something feels like a slight that I'm not subject to the same kinds of persecutions that I experienced under that asshole, and that my contributions actually are valued and relied upon. It's difficult though, a decade of dread isn't something that one gets over quickly, and it arguably hurts my workplace performance today.

/those ailments one wouldn't wish on one's worst enemy? I wish those upon him
//Krohn's Disease, for example, he would be a perfect candidate for it
///his adult son committed suicide. I can see why
 
TWX
2018-07-08 06:57:35 PM  

Any Pie Left: "I need you to come to my office"... and they never say what it's about. Could be they need me to change something minor on something insignificant, which could have been done over the phone or by email... or it could be "you've been on double-secret probation for a month and I'm writing you up for an imaginary infraction I have no proof of, but HR automatically believes anything I say so you're farked."


god I hate that one. Nowadays my current boss really likes me and he has never had anything worse than constructive criticism to offer in such circumstances, but every time he makes such a request I get the feeling that I'm in trouble and I have to remind myself that I'm not actually in trouble.
 
2018-07-08 07:02:01 PM  
It\s not anxiety but insecurity that makes me a better employee. I've been told a few times that I'm the last person who should be insecure, but I basically have two modes: insecure or cocky. Cocky me says, "You don't need to study for this exam, you're acing this class. You got this." (Result: 50%, bringing my grade down at least one letter grade.)
Insecure me tries extra hard and puts in extra work and performs at an optimum rate because I'm also second guessing my work and catching the majority of errors (which are minimal.)
 
2018-07-08 07:12:53 PM  

TWX: Any Pie Left: "I need you to come to my office"... and they never say what it's about. Could be they need me to change something minor on something insignificant, which could have been done over the phone or by email... or it could be "you've been on double-secret probation for a month and I'm writing you up for an imaginary infraction I have no proof of, but HR automatically believes anything I say so you're farked."

god I hate that one. Nowadays my current boss really likes me and he has never had anything worse than constructive criticism to offer in such circumstances, but every time he makes such a request I get the feeling that I'm in trouble and I have to remind myself that I'm not actually in trouble.


Much like when you drive past a cop on the road and you've done nothing wrong, that same feeling*

*Offer not valid if DWB
 
2018-07-08 07:15:54 PM  
I was that way when I had debt.  Managed to turn it around and have enough saved to last maybe 15 years.  Now I'm super relaxed, and it helps with confidence and concentration.  I really dig what I do, and I think that would have been ruined if I 'had' to.

Debt is a cancer on your life experience in so many ways, and most people are happy to take on more.  It's like some kind of Aesop's fable gone wrong.
 
TWX
2018-07-08 07:22:17 PM  

jayphat: TWX: Any Pie Left: "I need you to come to my office"... and they never say what it's about. Could be they need me to change something minor on something insignificant, which could have been done over the phone or by email... or it could be "you've been on double-secret probation for a month and I'm writing you up for an imaginary infraction I have no proof of, but HR automatically believes anything I say so you're farked."

god I hate that one. Nowadays my current boss really likes me and he has never had anything worse than constructive criticism to offer in such circumstances, but every time he makes such a request I get the feeling that I'm in trouble and I have to remind myself that I'm not actually in trouble.

Much like when you drive past a cop on the road and you've done nothing wrong, that same feeling*

*Offer not valid if DWB


Anyone in a car that doesn't slow down at the sight of a cop is already stopped.
 
2018-07-08 07:26:01 PM  

TWX: Anyone in a car that doesn't slow down at the sight of a cop is already stopped.


If I'm  clearly  busted, and I think I can duck out of sight, it's on!
 
2018-07-08 07:39:42 PM  
Cool story. My anxiety makes me unemployable.
 
TWX
2018-07-08 07:53:41 PM  

AcneVulgaris: TWX: Anyone in a car that doesn't slow down at the sight of a cop is already stopped.

If I'm  clearly  busted, and I think I can duck out of sight, it's on!


Well, yeah, but only if circumstances permit.

/might have been doing a burnout in a red '72 Barracuda as a sixteen year old sitting at a traffic light
//might not have seen the cop sitting in the middle of three oncoming lanes, buried several cars back until he lit-up his lightbar
///might have used knowledge of the neighborhood side streets to avoid having to have a side of the road chat
 
2018-07-08 08:14:46 PM  
My level of anxiousness depends on the job and/or the people I have to work for.
The absolute worst job I've had for anxiety levels was application support - off hours and weekends.  I lived in an apartment with very bad cell reception so I'd constantly be looking at that stupid blackberry to see if I missed anything.  Then there were system issues and a head of IT who would yell first and then get the details later.  I remember the time he sent me an email asking wtf went on with this program and one of the department heads he bcc'd on it replied that everything was already fixed so it was okay.  That really added to my stress level. knowing he's fricking bcc'ing people.  I lasted a short while in that role and decided that having a good nights sleep was more important than carrying around that fricken blackberry with the red flashing light.
 
2018-07-08 11:37:10 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Chevello: Harry Wagstaff: hyperventilating and crying helps be more productive...

Just do it in your own cubicle, not mine.

Welcome to the open office munechacho(sp?), ain't no where to hide from these helpless fractured people now!

/I am in an open office but we're setup with lots of hardware around us while we're testing it out.  I keep a bank of servers at ready to turn on if I need some strong white noise to either encourage a conversation to go elsewhere or remind people how stupid it was to put so many of us in a single big open space.


Open offices make me anxious
 
2018-07-09 02:07:03 AM  

bronyaur1: A little anxiety is a natural motivator.  The issue is when it overwhelms everything else.


Welcome to Trump's America. I have been feeling real palpable anxiety every day since that POS was elected to America's highest office. Can you even believe it?
 
2018-07-09 02:20:33 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-07-09 09:12:11 AM  

BMulligan: Imagine a world in which workers are fairly. Compensated for the value of their labor. Then what?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x194]

What does that get us? A discontented, lazy rabble instead of a thrifty, working class. And all because a few starry-eyed dreamers like Peter Bailey stir them up and fill their heads with a lot of impossible ideas.


What is the value of their labor in your analysis?  I go with marginal revenue product, in most cases.

The value of something in a market economy is that which someone would go to the trouble to acquire it.  In a Marxist universe, it is,the trouble it takes to create it.  The latter has rather resoundingly been demonstrated to not work very well.
 
2018-07-09 09:34:16 AM  

bronyaur1: The value of something in a market economy is that which someone would go to the trouble to acquire it.  In a Marxist universe, it is,the trouble it takes to create it.  The latter has rather resoundingly been demonstrated to not work very well.


Are you beginning to comprehend the inherent flaw in supply-side economics?  Well isn't that precious!

At some point it may even start dawning on you what "that which someone would go to the trouble to acquire it" really entails, how it's measured, and what's been going on with it lately!
 
2018-07-09 04:34:54 PM  
if anxiety/stress makes the person more effective then i'd hire them, if anxiety/stress makes the person a total basketcase, let alone less efficient, then no thanks. I've seen examples of both a number of times throughout my career
 
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