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(My Fox 8 Greensboro)   How members of the British royal family get their last names. 'Earl of Dumbass' already claimed in the politics tab   ( myfox8.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, Meghan Markle, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Charles, Prince of Wales, House of Windsor, Prince Harry, royal family, royal family member  
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3522 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 May 2018 at 11:05 AM (7 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-05-17 09:58:03 AM  
King Douchenozzle von Crunk unavailable for comment.
 
2018-05-17 10:29:27 AM  
This is what makes Shakespeare's history plays somewhat challenging for first timers. Many characters are called by five or six different names. Titles = income.
 
2018-05-17 10:36:33 AM  
Duke of Albany is available, since the last one was on the losing side of the family during WWI, and doubled down for WWII, and the Crown stripped him of the title.
 
2018-05-17 11:09:50 AM  
Arise, Sir Loin of Beef
Youtube 8Qtgm5g5Gyo
 
2018-05-17 11:10:41 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Qtgm5g5​Gyo]


Damn, too slow.
 
2018-05-17 11:12:41 AM  
Lord and Lady Douchebag
Youtube K_b3oPslctA
 
2018-05-17 11:14:56 AM  

OtherLittleGuy: Duke of Albany is available, since the last one was on the losing side of the family during WWI, and doubled down for WWII, and the Crown stripped him of the title.


Apparently so was the Duke of Connaught.

Although that part of the world not being English anymore might have been a small problem.
 
2018-05-17 11:16:02 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-05-17 11:17:34 AM  
Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?
 
2018-05-17 11:18:56 AM  
In before Elizabeth II, Admiral in the Great Navy of the State of Nebraska.
 
2018-05-17 11:21:32 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


And I am the Duke of Ted!
 
2018-05-17 11:22:18 AM  
"...it used to be 'Shiat-House'!"
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-05-17 11:22:52 AM  
Duke of earl.
Married With Children - Duke Of Earl
Youtube nwJ3FMLlrSQ
 
2018-05-17 11:23:24 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Qtgm5g5​Gyo]

Came here for this, leaving satisfied.
 
2018-05-17 11:25:50 AM  

OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?


No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.
 
2018-05-17 11:26:51 AM  
It could be worse, it was Saxe-Coburg-Gotha before WWI.
 
2018-05-17 11:30:58 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


And his children are Little Snots.
 
2018-05-17 11:31:22 AM  

doctorguilty: Tyrone Slothrop: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Qtgm5g5​Gyo]
Came here for this, leaving satisfied.


Yeah, that's pretty much obligatory.
 
2018-05-17 11:36:46 AM  

Amish Tech Support: [img.fark.net image 474x355]


I once witnessed a knuckle-dragging red-stater launch a tirade on Facebook against a guy with a hyphenated last name. Said knuckle-dragger assumed this person had adopted the last name of his wife upon marriage, and many of the typical aspersions such as "liberal snow flake" and "cuck" were cast. The target of the tirade coolly responded "Sir, I am British. My surname has existed in this form longer than your country has."
 
2018-05-17 11:37:51 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
OOF
2018-05-17 11:41:29 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-05-17 11:42:19 AM  
It's pronounced Doo-maws thank you very much
/Good Day Sir
//I said Good day
 
2018-05-17 11:42:36 AM  
So they tend to take place names based on their father's title?  A form of patronymic naming.  A convention similar to that which Welsh (and maybe Irish and Scots) people used until the English told them to "Stop, take a name and keep it!" oh so long ago.

Fark the royals with a crusty stick?
 
2018-05-17 11:47:12 AM  
European royals don't have last names. They're Prince Rutabaga of the House of Prunepitt or whatever. Last names are for commoners, to distinguish one from another: George (the) Smith, Robert (the) Tailor, John Johnson (John's son) and so on. Royals are "too special" to be confused with one another.

I knew an Ethiopian girl at work several years ago. She used her father's name as her surname because a last name is required in the US but Ethiopians don't have them.

Then there are all the Icelanders who just use a patronymic (for men) or matronymic (for ladies.) So John Ericsson's son might be Lars Johnson, and his son might be Olaf Larson (I'm using Scandinavian-American names in my example because I can't think of, or spell, actual Icelandic ones.) And the women go by So-and-so'sdottir (daughter) using their mother's first name. That used to be common practise throughout Scandinavia. (I knew a guy whose last name was Olson when it should have been Larson, because his great-grandfather Sven Larson was so nervous when he was at Ellis Island that when an immigration official suddenly asked him his name, startling him, he automatically reverted to the old form: "I'm Sven, Ole's son." So Olson was what got put in the records, and Olsons they were from then on.)

Then you have your Hungarians who put their family name first and their given name last. I think Vietnamese do that too. Last names can vary between generations, can actually be first names, and can even be nonexistent.
 
2018-05-17 12:00:45 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


And then there was King Ralph Jones.....
 
2018-05-17 12:04:29 PM  
Prince Weedlord Bonerhitler
 
2018-05-17 12:27:28 PM  

vinniethepoo: European royals don't have last names. They're Prince Rutabaga of the House of Prunepitt or whatever. Last names are for commoners, to distinguish one from another: George (the) Smith, Robert (the) Tailor, John Johnson (John's son) and so on. Royals are "too special" to be confused with one another.

I knew an Ethiopian girl at work several years ago. She used her father's name as her surname because a last name is required in the US but Ethiopians don't have them.

Then there are all the Icelanders who just use a patronymic (for men) or matronymic (for ladies.) So John Ericsson's son might be Lars Johnson, and his son might be Olaf Larson (I'm using Scandinavian-American names in my example because I can't think of, or spell, actual Icelandic ones.) And the women go by So-and-so'sdottir (daughter) using their mother's first name. That used to be common practise throughout Scandinavia. (I knew a guy whose last name was Olson when it should have been Larson, because his great-grandfather Sven Larson was so nervous when he was at Ellis Island that when an immigration official suddenly asked him his name, startling him, he automatically reverted to the old form: "I'm Sven, Ole's son." So Olson was what got put in the records, and Olsons they were from then on.)

Then you have your Hungarians who put their family name first and their given name last. I think Vietnamese do that too. Last names can vary between generations, can actually be first names, and can even be nonexistent.


That's some mighty fancy explainin' there, Mr. Poo.
 
2018-05-17 12:44:09 PM  
I'm the Earl of Obe.

/what you say?
 
2018-05-17 01:15:07 PM  

HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.


I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either. Will someone please explain? Thank you.
 
2018-05-17 01:19:13 PM  
TFA doesn't understand the difference between a title and a surname.  "Wales" and "Cambridge" aren't surnames, they're titles that are used in the place of surnames as a matter of convenience and tradition.  As TFA correctly points out, the British royal family's last name is Mountbatten-Windsor, although the Queen is technically the last member of the house of Windsor.  In addition, the name of the royal house is not necessarily the same as the monarch's surname.  The house of Windsor is an example where the surname is the same as the house name.  Its predecessor, the house of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is an example where the surname (Wettin) was different.
 
2018-05-17 01:19:39 PM  

billiamaire: HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.

I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either.


No one does.

That's the joke.
 
2018-05-17 01:19:56 PM  

billiamaire: HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.

I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either. Will someone please explain? Thank you.


The it is the not getting it.  Or in other words, "what is wrong with you?"
 
2018-05-17 01:22:20 PM  
 
2018-05-17 01:33:37 PM  
Since I had the same problem for years I'll bite:

1.  Google "gene masseth" without quotes of course.
2.  Click on any of the images on the page.
3.  Read the names of the good samaritans shoveling snow.
 
2018-05-17 06:24:16 PM  

SansNeural: billiamaire: HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.

I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either. Will someone please explain? Thank you.

The it is the not getting it.  Or in other words, "what is wrong with you?"


Obviously I'm a stupid farker.
 
2018-05-17 07:06:07 PM  

billiamaire: SansNeural: billiamaire: HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.

I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either. Will someone please explain? Thank you.

The it is the not getting it.  Or in other words, "what is wrong with you?"

Obviously I'm a stupid farker.


Oh! I am sorry. I didn't mean to insult you.
When the reporter asked the two good Samaritans their names the first one said "Gene Masseth".  The other, being a quick thinking, more humorous sort, replies "Heywood Jablome".
Sound out the second name, both first and last.  The vowels "o" and "e" are pronounced in their LONG mode (OOO & EEE).
Alternatively, go here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?​v=CNbHG7​SLnJ8
Hope this helps.
 
2018-05-17 08:06:13 PM  

vinniethepoo: European royals don't have last names. They're Prince Rutabaga of the House of Prunepitt or whatever. Last names are for commoners, to distinguish one from another: George (the) Smith, Robert (the) Tailor, John Johnson (John's son) and so on. Royals are "too special" to be confused with one another.


It wasn't that long ago that European commoners didn't have last names either. I think royals just retained the old way of naming people.
 
6 days ago  

strobis48z4: billiamaire: SansNeural: billiamaire: HailRobonia: OldJames: Is Sir Haywood Jablome available?

No, but Baron Gene Masseth is.

I'm ashamed to say this but I never got the Gene Masseth thing. I've asked friends and they don't get it either. Will someone please explain? Thank you.

The it is the not getting it.  Or in other words, "what is wrong with you?"

Obviously I'm a stupid farker.

Oh! I am sorry. I didn't mean to insult you.


Neither did I.  My "what is wrong with you?" quip was more about the general feeling I (and I assume others) had while struggling to understand what was(n't) funny about it.
 
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