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(YouTube)   Two-minute visualization of the whole 2017 hurricane season, with salt, dust and smoke from the western fires all tracked. Because science is awesome   ( youtube.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Tiny aerosol particles, Aerosol, Gas, Sodium chloride, sea salt  
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1839 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Nov 2017 at 12:20 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»




2017 Hurricanes and Aerosols Simulation

How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.

This visualization uses data from NASA satellites, combined with mathematical models in a computer simulation allowing scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.

During the same time, large fires in the Pacific Northwest released smoke into the atmosphere. Large weather patterns can transport these particles long distances: in early September, you can see a line of smoke from Oregon and Washington, down the Great Plains, through the South, and across the Atlantic to England.

Dust from the Sahara is also caught in storms sytems and moved from Africa to the Americas. Unlike the sea salt, however, the dust is removed from the center of the storm. The dust particles are absorbed by cloud droplets and then washed out as it rains.

Advances in computing speed allow scientists to include more details of these physical processes in their simulations of how the aerosols interact with the storm systems.

Supercomputing 2017 conference:
https://www.nas.nasa.gov/SC17/home.html

Credits:
Matthew R. Radcliff (USRA): Lead Producer
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Technical Support
William Putman (NASA/GSFC): Lead Scientist
Anton S. Darmenov (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Ellen T. Gray (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Narrator

Music: Elapsing Time by Christian Telford [ASCAP], Robert Anthony Navarro [ASCAP]

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12772

If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer

Or subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD Podcast: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f00​04_index.html

Follow NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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