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(Sky.com)   "This is your Captain speaking, we apologize for the rough landing, but we are safely on the ground. Please now close your window to avoid seeing the side of the cliff we are hanging off and we hope you had a pleasant flight"   ( news.sky.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Turkey, news agency Anadolu, Turkish capital Ankara, Social media users, Trabzon, muddy cliff, Southwest Airlines, runway excursion  
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7574 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2018 at 9:20 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2018-01-14 06:00:04 AM  
...and the Captain's sphincter shrank 3 sizes that day...
 
2018-01-14 07:36:28 AM  
"If you can walk away from a landing, it's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
Chuck Yeager
 
2018-01-14 08:02:32 AM  
Pining for the fjord?

/Will make for an interesting recovery, unless they chop it up into itty bitty bits.
 
2018-01-14 08:04:05 AM  
Worst flight I was ever on was a Southwest flight from Vegas to LA.

We were a little over half way when the primary hydraulic system suddenly lost pressure, meaning it was no longer capable of performing its duties of applying the brakes once we landed, or lowering the wheels so we could land, or steering the plane so we could get to an airport in the first place.

Fortunately, hydraulic systems are so critical to a plane's operation - as critical as wings - that passenger planes have secondary hydraulic systems.  Unfortunately, we didn't know why or how the first system failed, and whether the same would happen to the second.  So we were either doomed or fine.

The pilot turned the plane around and hauled tail back to Vegas, because, as the frightened crew told us, there was more open space and the emergency equipment was better.  And we sat waiting to find out what would happen to us.  The young sales lady next to me couldn't stop crying.  I held her hand.

And it was fine.  We landed.  On a cleared runway with emergency vehicles everywhere, while braced in crash position, but we landed fine.  And then we all went and got drunk, which, being in Vegas, we were able to do in spectacular fashion.

The weirdest thing was I was calm the whole time, and boarded the new flight to LA with no issues, and finished my trip with no problems, but when I got back to the airport to fly home I couldn't get on the plane.  My brain said go, but my body said no way.  I had to extend my stay, and was thinking I might need to drive back, but fortunately I got over... whatever that was.

Got a $200 credit from Southwest though.  Yay.
 
2018-01-14 08:42:21 AM  
They ran out of coffee.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2018-01-14 08:52:25 AM  
I'm no pilot, but I think you're supposed to land parallel with the long axis of the runway.
 
2018-01-14 09:25:06 AM  
Braking News
 
2018-01-14 09:30:21 AM  
I knew turkeys couldn't fly!

...I dunno,  I got nothing.
 
2018-01-14 09:39:31 AM  
"runway excursion"  That's one of the bust euphemisms ever.
 
2018-01-14 09:40:42 AM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2018-01-14 09:43:15 AM  
We've got the strangest names for things like this.  This one was a "runway excursion" which sounds like a pleasant Saturday stroll to a fashion show.  Chernobyl was a "power transient" which sounds like a metal band you'd find playing under an overpass, down by the river.
 
2018-01-14 09:44:04 AM  
Did someone tell them that pgs can't fly?
 
2018-01-14 09:47:19 AM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-14 09:50:29 AM  

indifference_engine: We've got the strangest names for things like this.  This one was a "runway excursion" which sounds like a pleasant Saturday stroll to a fashion show.  Chernobyl was a "power transient" which sounds like a metal band you'd find playing under an overpass, down by the river.


Those barrels of flaming trash are super useful during metal concerts
 
2018-01-14 09:55:06 AM  
rnatalie:
img.fark.netView Full Size


Well, Pegasus can fly. There is nothing in Greek myths that would imply that Pegasus can also land.
 
2018-01-14 09:59:13 AM  

ZAZ: I'm no pilot, but I think you're supposed to land parallel with the long axis of the runway.


"What a strange runway.  10,000' wide but only 150' long!"
 
2018-01-14 10:10:29 AM  

Scaley: Braking News


More like "Not braking news".
 
2018-01-14 10:14:40 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size


According to Pegasus airlines spokes person, Kathy Jenkins, the 737 was found to be missing at around 11:30 last night.  It is believed that the airplane slipped out quietly during "lights out" and returned sometime early this morning. "She turned off all her communication systems, so we aren't surewhere she went.", said Jenkins.  "However, we have reason to believe it may have been New Orleans."
 
2018-01-14 10:19:05 AM  
20-30 years ago I was leaving an embedded systems conference in the bay area.  We took off and flattened out.  I don't know how high we were, but people were people, not ants.  I'm looking out my window thinking "this is weird".  Next thing I know we're turning around, heading back to the airport.  As we approach the runway there was an assload of emergency equipement, as we passed them they accelerated to keep up with us.  The only thing the pilot said was "prepare for landing".  Uneventful landing.

Turned out a coffee maker had set off a smoke alarm, they fixed it and we took off 2-3 hours later.
 
2018-01-14 10:20:51 AM  

jasonvatch: "If you can walk away from a landing, iat's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
Chuck Yeager


"Take offs are optional. Landings are mandatory."
-probably not Chuck Yeager
 
2018-01-14 10:23:43 AM  

ZAZ: I'm no pilot, but I think you're supposed to land parallel with the long axis of the runway.


A plane is nearing its destination. The pilot turns to his co-pilot and remarks: "That looks like a really short runway." The co-pilot looks at it and says: "Yes, captain, its really short." 100 meters from the runway, the pilot communicates to the passengers and crew: "Fasten your seatbelts, this is going to be an extremely close landing!" The plane touches down on the ground, engages maximum breaks, and with schreaching tires comes to a stop two meters from the end of the runway. "Phew, " says the pilot relieved. "That was the shortest landing I've ever made." The co-pilot looks out of the windows and answers: "And certainly on the widest runway I've every seen.."
 
2018-01-14 10:25:16 AM  
Fun times.

Never had it that bad.  Have had some bad experiences flying, though.

Flying to Tampa on a 737, and having the plane hitting large pockets of turbulence.  Sphincters were clenched, but a bunch of bags were used.  Landing in a rain and high wind also means "extreme crabbing", so you get to feel the plane changing directions pretty hard on the runway.

Flying to Denver in a Beechcraft 1900 (tiny turboprop) during a snowstorm.  Extra fun because the plane couldn't fly over the weather, we flew through it.  Plane was small enough you could hear the alarms from the cockpit the entire flight.  Bonus is knowing that larger planes wouldn't have risked it because everything was grounded in Denver when we landed.

Flying to Kansas City in a Dash-8 (large turboprop).  Takeoff was so rough the flight attendant was asked if we were taking off on square wheels.  Landing wasn't much better.

Latest bit of fun, landing in Newark on a Embraer 175.  Experience a new first.  We landed so hard that we bounced the plane back into the air, then they managed to slam the plane back down onto the runway.
 
2018-01-14 10:27:38 AM  

Snotnose: 20-30 years ago I was leaving an embedded systems conference in the bay area.  We took off and flattened out.  I don't know how high we were, but people were people, not ants.  I'm looking out my window thinking "this is weird".  Next thing I know we're turning around, heading back to the airport.  As we approach the runway there was an assload of emergency equipement, as we passed them they accelerated to keep up with us.  The only thing the pilot said was "prepare for landing".  Uneventful landing.

Turned out a coffee maker had set off a smoke alarm, they fixed it and we took off 2-3 hours later.


Yeah.  If I'm ever on a plane that requires an emergency landing with an "assload of emergency equipment", false alarm or no I'm getting on a different plane.
 
2018-01-14 10:44:01 AM  
Bet there was as much mud inside as outside
 
2018-01-14 10:47:38 AM  
I guess in a situation like that the airframe is a writeoff and they'll just cut it apart for scrap and recover the engines. Or is it possible to recover the aircraft?
 
2018-01-14 10:48:13 AM  
Runways can be treacherous.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-14 10:50:18 AM  

SomeAmerican: Worst flight I was ever on was a Southwest flight from Vegas to LA.

We were a little over half way when the primary hydraulic system suddenly lost pressure, meaning it was no longer capable of performing its duties of applying the brakes once we landed, or lowering the wheels so we could land, or steering the plane so we could get to an airport in the first place.

Fortunately, hydraulic systems are so critical to a plane's operation - as critical as wings - that passenger planes have secondary hydraulic systems.  Unfortunately, we didn't know why or how the first system failed, and whether the same would happen to the second.  So we were either doomed or fine.

The pilot turned the plane around and hauled tail back to Vegas, because, as the frightened crew told us, there was more open space and the emergency equipment was better.  And we sat waiting to find out what would happen to us.  The young sales lady next to me couldn't stop crying.  I held her hand.

And it was fine.  We landed.  On a cleared runway with emergency vehicles everywhere, while braced in crash position, but we landed fine.  And then we all went and got drunk, which, being in Vegas, we were able to do in spectacular fashion.

The weirdest thing was I was calm the whole time, and boarded the new flight to LA with no issues, and finished my trip with no problems, but when I got back to the airport to fly home I couldn't get on the plane.  My brain said go, but my body said no way.  I had to extend my stay, and was thinking I might need to drive back, but fortunately I got over... whatever that was.

Got a $200 credit from Southwest though.  Yay.


did you sleep with the sales lady?
 
2018-01-14 11:32:59 AM  
Laurie Anderson - From The Air
Youtube hedIexysvK4
 
2018-01-14 11:46:41 AM  

SomeAmerican: Worst flight I was ever on was a Southwest flight from Vegas to LA.

We were a little over half way when the primary hydraulic system suddenly lost pressure, meaning it was no longer capable of performing its duties of applying the brakes once we landed, or lowering the wheels so we could land, or steering the plane so we could get to an airport in the first place.

Fortunately, hydraulic systems are so critical to a plane's operation - as critical as wings - that passenger planes have secondary hydraulic systems.  Unfortunately, we didn't know why or how the first system failed, and whether the same would happen to the second.  So we were either doomed or fine.

The pilot turned the plane around and hauled tail back to Vegas, because, as the frightened crew told us, there was more open space and the emergency equipment was better.  And we sat waiting to find out what would happen to us.  The young sales lady next to me couldn't stop crying.  I held her hand.

And it was fine.  We landed.  On a cleared runway with emergency vehicles everywhere, while braced in crash position, but we landed fine.  And then we all went and got drunk, which, being in Vegas, we were able to do in spectacular fashion.

The weirdest thing was I was calm the whole time, and boarded the new flight to LA with no issues, and finished my trip with no problems, but when I got back to the airport to fly home I couldn't get on the plane.  My brain said go, but my body said no way.  I had to extend my stay, and was thinking I might need to drive back, but fortunately I got over... whatever that was.

Got a $200 credit from Southwest though.  Yay.


So what about the young crying saleslady? You left out details. Mile high club? Am I right?
 
2018-01-14 12:02:24 PM  
Pegasus has a pretty dismal security record even for a low cost airline.
 
2018-01-14 12:07:57 PM  
'Turn left, Clyde'
 
2018-01-14 12:11:09 PM  
Putz
 
2018-01-14 12:32:26 PM  

SomeAmerican: Worst flight I was ever on was a Southwest flight from Vegas to LA.

We were a little over half way when the primary hydraulic system suddenly lost pressure, meaning it was no longer capable of performing its duties of applying the brakes once we landed, or lowering the wheels so we could land, or steering the plane so we could get to an airport in the first place.

Fortunately, hydraulic systems are so critical to a plane's operation - as critical as wings - that passenger planes have secondary hydraulic systems.  Unfortunately, we didn't know why or how the first system failed, and whether the same would happen to the second.  So we were either doomed or fine.

The pilot turned the plane around and hauled tail back to Vegas, because, as the frightened crew told us, there was more open space and the emergency equipment was better.  And we sat waiting to find out what would happen to us.  The young sales lady next to me couldn't stop crying.  I held her hand.

And it was fine.  We landed.  On a cleared runway with emergency vehicles everywhere, while braced in crash position, but we landed fine.  And then we all went and got drunk, which, being in Vegas, we were able to do in spectacular fashion.

The weirdest thing was I was calm the whole time, and boarded the new flight to LA with no issues, and finished my trip with no problems, but when I got back to the airport to fly home I couldn't get on the plane.  My brain said go, but my body said no way.  I had to extend my stay, and was thinking I might need to drive back, but fortunately I got over... whatever that was.

Got a $200 credit from Southwest though.  Yay.


CSB!  Glad you made it.  Did you make the young lady too? ;-)
 
2018-01-14 12:40:36 PM  

Imaginativescreenname: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/hedIexys​vK4]


I love that Laurie Anderson track...
 
2018-01-14 12:52:32 PM  

SomeAmerican: Worst flight I was ever on was a Southwest flight from Vegas to LA.

We were a little over half way when the primary hydraulic system suddenly lost pressure, meaning it was no longer capable of performing its duties of applying the brakes once we landed, or lowering the wheels so we could land, or steering the plane so we could get to an airport in the first place.

Fortunately, hydraulic systems are so critical to a plane's operation - as critical as wings - that passenger planes have secondary hydraulic systems.  Unfortunately, we didn't know why or how the first system failed, and whether the same would happen to the second.  So we were either doomed or fine.

The pilot turned the plane around and hauled tail back to Vegas, because, as the frightened crew told us, there was more open space and the emergency equipment was better.  And we sat waiting to find out what would happen to us.  The young sales lady next to me couldn't stop crying.  I held her hand.

And it was fine.  We landed.  On a cleared runway with emergency vehicles everywhere, while braced in crash position, but we landed fine.  And then we all went and got drunk, which, being in Vegas, we were able to do in spectacular fashion.

The weirdest thing was I was calm the whole time, and boarded the new flight to LA with no issues, and finished my trip with no problems, but when I got back to the airport to fly home I couldn't get on the plane.  My brain said go, but my body said no way.  I had to extend my stay, and was thinking I might need to drive back, but fortunately I got over... whatever that was.

Got a $200 credit from Southwest though.  Yay.


If you didn't see it yet, go see Absinthe in Vegas.

You know, a crash story would have been more interesting or the story about you and the Sales lady in Vegas... but hey..,glad you made it.
 
2018-01-14 01:10:20 PM  
I have flown in the Russian copy of the DC-10. And lived. I'm pretty much immortal now.
 
2018-01-14 01:10:59 PM  
I've had two "interesting" landings.

The first was at Newark, where the crosswind was so bad I could see the entire center line on the runway.

The second was San Diego. Turbulence was awful, and when we touched down, the right wingtip was less than three feet off the ground.
 
2018-01-14 01:13:49 PM  

MythDragon: jasonvatch: "If you can walk away from a landing, iat's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
Chuck Yeager

"Take offs are optional. Landings are mandatory."
-probably not Chuck Yeager


It is always better to be on the ground, wishing you were flying, then to be flying, wishing you were on the ground.
 
2018-01-14 01:16:02 PM  
What author thinks of when someone says "cliff diving":

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-14 01:23:58 PM  

CluelessMoron: I guess in a situation like that the airframe is a writeoff and they'll just cut it apart for scrap and recover the engines. Or is it possible to recover the aircraft?


From what I saw in the picture, those engines were buried 1/4 deep in the clif side. There is nothing left to salvage in those. At this point you are looking at recovering seats and interior fixtures, and maybe parts from the cockpit. The rest is destined for future soda cans.
 
2018-01-14 01:29:28 PM  

indifference_engine: We've got the strangest names for things like this.  This one was a "runway excursion" which sounds like a pleasant Saturday stroll to a fashion show.  Chernobyl was a "power transient" which sounds like a metal band you'd find playing under an overpass, down by the river.


Yeah. I had that bit copied.
Sounded like the pilot came over the com system and said something like "ladies and gentlemen, as we have landed ahead of schedule, I would like to take the opportunity to give you an amazing view of the bay here in Trabzon."

/my guess, and knowing the weather there this time of year, I'm guessing the unblocked wind froze the rain/snow-melt on the runway.
 
2018-01-14 01:33:14 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: CluelessMoron: I guess in a situation like that the airframe is a writeoff and they'll just cut it apart for scrap and recover the engines. Or is it possible to recover the aircraft?

From what I saw in the picture, those engines were buried 1/4 deep in the clif side. There is nothing left to salvage in those. At this point you are looking at recovering seats and interior fixtures, and maybe parts from the cockpit. The rest is destined for future soda cans.


That's a total hull loss.  Break it for scrap.  One engine looks sheered off, the other is buried in dirt and rocks so probable smashed to bits.  While the airframe looks mostly intact, it is probably cracked a couple places from going off the runway and smashing down the cliff. No way it flies again. However as bad as it looks, the plane did it's job as the passengers and crew survived.
 
2018-01-14 01:37:42 PM  
Never going to get that smell out.
 
2018-01-14 01:44:43 PM  

Daedalus27: Evil Twin Skippy: CluelessMoron: I guess in a situation like that the airframe is a writeoff and they'll just cut it apart for scrap and recover the engines. Or is it possible to recover the aircraft?

From what I saw in the picture, those engines were buried 1/4 deep in the clif side. There is nothing left to salvage in those. At this point you are looking at recovering seats and interior fixtures, and maybe parts from the cockpit. The rest is destined for future soda cans.

That's a total hull loss.  Break it for scrap.  One engine looks sheered off, the other is buried in dirt and rocks so probable smashed to bits.  While the airframe looks mostly intact, it is probably cracked a couple places from going off the runway and smashing down the cliff. No way it flies again. However as bad as it looks, the plane did it's job as the passengers and crew survived.


Once airborne, the aircraft itself is expendable. It exists soley to ensure the safe return of it's passengers.

/old avaition bits o' wisdom
//most of which
///are adapted old sailing bit o' wisdom
 
2018-01-14 01:53:42 PM  

Daedalus27: Evil Twin Skippy: CluelessMoron: I guess in a situation like that the airframe is a writeoff and they'll just cut it apart for scrap and recover the engines. Or is it possible to recover the aircraft?

From what I saw in the picture, those engines were buried 1/4 deep in the clif side. There is nothing left to salvage in those. At this point you are looking at recovering seats and interior fixtures, and maybe parts from the cockpit. The rest is destined for future soda cans.

That's a total hull loss.  Break it for scrap.  One engine looks sheered off, the other is buried in dirt and rocks so probable smashed to bits.  While the airframe looks mostly intact, it is probably cracked a couple places from going off the runway and smashing down the cliff. No way it flies again. However as bad as it looks, the plane did it's job as the passengers and crew survived.


Oooh, you're right.  It's worse than it looked from the first pic I saw.  Engine #1 ate lots of dirt:

img.fark.netView Full Size


Engine #2 is in the drink:

img.fark.netView Full Size


I think I'd be willing to pay a small premium for a beer in a can made from that airplane.
 
2018-01-14 02:02:19 PM  
It will be interesting to see what happened to cause it to go off the runway.  Did they land long and hard breaking caused tires to blow and a loss of control?  Did the thrust reversers only deploy on one side and the crew wasn't ready?  They have the black boxes, the crew, and the passengers to interview which should allow this to be figured out quick. Air Crash Investigation/Mayday always needs new episode material and it is refreshing when everyone survives a hull loss.
 
2018-01-14 02:05:47 PM  
Here is another example of going off the runway although that was hydroplaning on a wet runway that doesn't seem like an issue here from the pictures:

Air Crash Investigation "Edge of Disaster" Season 15, Episode 6
 
2018-01-14 02:06:11 PM  

MythDragon: jasonvatch: "If you can walk away from a landing, iat's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
Chuck Yeager

"Take offs are optional. Landings are mandatory."
-probably not Chuck Yeager


Planes are interesting things.... Even if you run out of fuel, you always have enough power to get you to the crash site.
 
2018-01-14 02:09:34 PM  

wxboy: ZAZ: I'm no pilot, but I think you're supposed to land parallel with the long axis of the runway.

"What a strange runway.  10,000' wide but only 150' long!"



That's a whole lot of sideways for what had to be the last few seconds of the landing.
 
2018-01-14 02:30:04 PM  

dj495ufj3: MythDragon: jasonvatch: "If you can walk away from a landing, iat's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
Chuck Yeager

"Take offs are optional. Landings are mandatory."
-probably not Chuck Yeager

Planes are interesting things.... Even if you run out of fuel, you always have enough power to get you to the crash site.


"It's generally a bad idea to run out of speed, altitude, and ideas all at the same time."
 
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