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(MLB Trade Rumors)   Attn Baseball Geeks: can a team cut a player if they lose an arbitration case with him? I would think yes, but don't know for sure   ( mlbtraderumors.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Baseball statistics, Home run, Major League Baseball, Babe Ruth, Batting average  
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672 clicks; posted to Sports » on 12 Jan 2018 at 6:35 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2018-01-12 04:46:47 PM  
That would be bad faith at a minimum. Sounds like a lawsuit would follow.
 
2018-01-12 04:49:28 PM  
Just a guess, but I think the one year tenders and arbitration awards result in guaranteed contracts. Even if the player was cut, they'd still have to pay him.
 
2018-01-12 06:52:05 PM  
You can, but if you weren't interested in keeping the player, you would have traded or released him before going to arbitration. Both sides shoot for what they think is fair market value anyway. Pick an outrageous number and they'll rule against you, leaving you stuck with the other side's offer.
 
2018-01-12 07:30:50 PM  
I was just reading about this the other day. Was looking up whether players optioned down to the minors with arbitration contracts still get paid their money. The short answer is... yes.

From MLB's site:

Players on arbitration contracts who are cut on or before the 16th day of Spring Training are owed 30 days' termination pay (based on the prorated version of his agreed-upon arbitration salary). A player cut between the 16th day and the end of Spring Training is owed 45 days' termination pay (based on the prorated version of his agreed-upon arbitration salary). The arbitration salary becomes guaranteed if the player is on the 25-man roster when the season begins.

So if a team really decides they're not worth their arbitration amount, they can simply a cut the player. No team has done this, and it seems unlikely a team would, because:

A) Even if overpaid, a player is likely worth *something* in a trade, and other teams are likely able to absorb a one-year contract
B) By tendering a contract offer in the first place, you're already expressing some sort of confidence that this player would have some value.
 
2018-01-12 08:30:58 PM  
If a team's arbitration offer is very far removed from the player's offer, and far enough from fair that the arbitrator goes with the player, they might be tempted to drop him, but it's not like they're going to be $10 million apart. According to the website subby linked, Betts and Boston are $3 million apart, and Springer and Houston are $2 million apart. I doubt either team would cut the guy if they lose.
I suppose if there's a guy going into his last arb-eligible season, and he really doesn't fit in with the team's future, they might be tempted to cut him, but it's hard to imagine a scenario where the player had no trade value at all, and still got an exorbitant arbitration sum.
 
2018-01-12 09:06:11 PM  
Baseball contracts are guaranteed.  Once the team offer arbitration, they're committed.

If they release the player, they're still on the hook for whatever the arbitrator decided.  If the player is released and catches on, then the new team would pay the league minimum, but the team that lost the arbitration has to pay the rest.

So there's no reason to release the player, since you're paying his salary anyway.  And you only offer arbitration if you think the player will be an asset to the team.
 
2018-01-12 10:25:25 PM  

RealityChuck: Baseball contracts are guaranteed.  Once the team offer arbitration, they're committed.

If they release the player, they're still on the hook for whatever the arbitrator decided.  If the player is released and catches on, then the new team would pay the league minimum, but the team that lost the arbitration has to pay the rest.

So there's no reason to release the player, since you're paying his salary anyway.  And you only offer arbitration if you think the player will be an asset to the team.


I believe it's called 'binding arbitration' for a reason...
 
2018-01-13 12:30:00 AM  
Baseball contracts are guaranteed.  They can cut anyone they want any time they want.  They still have to pay them.
 
2018-01-13 12:54:15 AM  
In 2015, the white Sox released Dayan Viciedo prior to spring training after an arbitration award of about 3 million.  The white sox were responsible for 25% of Viciedo's salary.  it's the only time I can recall this happening.
 
2018-01-13 10:46:53 AM  

SpockYouOut: In 2015, the white Sox released Dayan Viciedo prior to spring training after an arbitration award of about 3 million.  The white sox were responsible for 25% of Viciedo's salary.  it's the only time I can recall this happening.


Actually, they avoided arbitration by signing him to a $4.4 million contract in January 2015, released him in early February and paid him less than $750,000 of that contract.
 
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