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(Daily Express)   NASA has a probe that will travel at 430,000 MPH towards the center of our solar system. The Sun is there (possible nsfw content on page)   ( express.co.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting, Sun, astrophysicist Eugene Parker, Sun alerted science, planetary magnetic systems, huge solar event, Interstellar medium, Mars, Mercury  
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1394 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Jan 2018 at 2:05 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-01-12 12:20:52 PM  
here it is on final assembly
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-12 01:02:13 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-12 01:13:05 PM  
I bet it would go faster with an Epstein Drive.
 
2018-01-12 01:34:57 PM  
Making something get close to the sun requires a lot of change in velocity. That's why I always laugh when someone wants to fire something into the sun. It would be easier to put it on the ocean floor near a subduction zone and let geological processes take over.

/Quality headline, substein.
 
2018-01-12 01:55:42 PM  
Pink Floyd - Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
Youtube 8RbXIMZmVv8
 
2018-01-12 02:08:00 PM  

UberDave: I bet it would go faster with an Epstein Drive.


That would be ironic since old jewish women tend to drive slower than normal
 
2018-01-12 02:12:29 PM  
Are there black buttons on a black console with a black light that lights up black?
 
2018-01-12 02:13:17 PM  
Are they sending it at night?
 
2018-01-12 02:25:02 PM  
Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi
 
2018-01-12 02:25:17 PM  
go*
 
2018-01-12 02:37:50 PM  

CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi


Data rate to the probe is on the order of 25 Kbps and ping will be anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.  Going to make playing Overwatch a bit tough.
 
2018-01-12 02:40:02 PM  

CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi


you get wifi but it is through comcast. sorry.

/in space no one can hear you scream...about losing net neutrality
 
2018-01-12 02:42:05 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi

Data rate to the probe is on the order of 25 Kbps and ping will be anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.  Going to make playing Overwatch a bit tough.


It's ok, most of my games are offline.
 
2018-01-12 02:43:10 PM  
NASA has probe that will travel at 430,000 MPH towards the center of our solar system.

At that speed they'd reach the Earth core in about 30 seconds.
 
2018-01-12 02:44:06 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Making something get close to the sun requires a lot of change in velocity. That's why I always laugh when someone wants to fire something into the sun. It would be easier to put it on the ocean floor near a subduction zone and let geological processes take over.

/Quality headline, substein.


A preferred method for getting a solar flyby is actually using a gravity assist around Jupiter to slow down.
It takes less delta V to launch up to Jupiter's orbit and use its massive gravity well to slow down to your final perihelion than it does to sit at Earth orbit and slow down all on your own.

Ulysses was last solar probe to do that (though its job was to map the polar regions of the sun so it mainly used Jupiter to do a plane change and kick itself up to around 80 degrees off the ecliptic).

The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.  Solar Parker is going to use somewhere around 7 flybys of Venus to gradually drop its perihelion until it's making a close approach to the sun every 3 months or so.

Meanwhile, in KSP I killed a couple guys by crashing them into the sun when I was trying to put a station into low solar orbit.
 
2018-01-12 02:45:53 PM  
KanedaParker Solar Probe! What do you see?
 
2018-01-12 03:00:34 PM  

dennysgod: NASA has probe that will travel at 430,000 MPH towards the center of our solar system.

At that speed they'd reach the Earth core in about 30 seconds.


How does a flat disk have a core?
 
2018-01-12 03:28:08 PM  

freidog: Tr0mBoNe: Making something get close to the sun requires a lot of change in velocity. That's why I always laugh when someone wants to fire something into the sun. It would be easier to put it on the ocean floor near a subduction zone and let geological processes take over.

/Quality headline, substein.

A preferred method for getting a solar flyby is actually using a gravity assist around Jupiter to slow down.
It takes less delta V to launch up to Jupiter's orbit and use its massive gravity well to slow down to your final perihelion than it does to sit at Earth orbit and slow down all on your own.

Ulysses was last solar probe to do that (though its job was to map the polar regions of the sun so it mainly used Jupiter to do a plane change and kick itself up to around 80 degrees off the ecliptic).

The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.  Solar Parker is going to use somewhere around 7 flybys of Venus to gradually drop its perihelion until it's making a close approach to the sun every 3 months or so.

Meanwhile, in KSP I killed a couple guys by crashing them into the sun when I was trying to put a station into low solar orbit.


I prefer the single slingshot method, but wasn't the high eccentricity of the Ulysses mission a requirement and not a limitation of the maneuver? Like, couldn't they have done the same thing without going out of the ecliptic?

I bring it up because I did the same thing in kerbal and empty low orbit.

/loves killing kerbals
 
2018-01-12 03:28:45 PM  
Kept my low orbit. Drr
 
2018-01-12 03:54:21 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: freidog: Tr0mBoNe: Making something get close to the sun requires a lot of change in velocity. That's why I always laugh when someone wants to fire something into the sun. It would be easier to put it on the ocean floor near a subduction zone and let geological processes take over.

/Quality headline, substein.

A preferred method for getting a solar flyby is actually using a gravity assist around Jupiter to slow down.
It takes less delta V to launch up to Jupiter's orbit and use its massive gravity well to slow down to your final perihelion than it does to sit at Earth orbit and slow down all on your own.

Ulysses was last solar probe to do that (though its job was to map the polar regions of the sun so it mainly used Jupiter to do a plane change and kick itself up to around 80 degrees off the ecliptic).

The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.  Solar Parker is going to use somewhere around 7 flybys of Venus to gradually drop its perihelion until it's making a close approach to the sun every 3 months or so.

Meanwhile, in KSP I killed a couple guys by crashing them into the sun when I was trying to put a station into low solar orbit.

I prefer the single slingshot method, but wasn't the high eccentricity of the Ulysses mission a requirement and not a limitation of the maneuver? Like, couldn't they have done the same thing without going out of the ecliptic?

I bring it up because I did the same thing in kerbal and empty low orbit.

/loves killing kerbals


If you want to go full astro-nerd, try the boardgame High Frontier:
cf.geekdo-images.comView Full Size
The line on the map aren't orbits, they are "paths" between objects in the solar system reflecting the ease of getting something from A to B. Each junction reflects a point where fuel is needed to alter the actual path of the spacecraft.
 
2018-01-12 04:06:14 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi

Data rate to the probe is on the order of 25 Kbps and ping will be anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.  Going to make playing Overwatch a bit tough.


That's OK. You just need one ping only.
 
2018-01-12 04:12:06 PM  

freidog: The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.


Ulysses never got close to the sun. Perihelion was farther out than Earth's orbit. The mission was mainly about seeing the suns poles. Thus:

Tr0mBoNe: Like, couldn't they have done the same thing without going out of the ecliptic?


the answer to this is no. If you eliminate the need to alter the inclination, then Jupiter becomes of no use. Using Jupiter can drop perihelion over time, but conservation of energy still requires aphelion to extend to Jupiter's orbit. This is the same thing that allows them to use Venus multiple times. But to decrease both aphelion and perihelion, you need to do at least two different trajectory altering maneuvers.
 
2018-01-12 04:21:40 PM  

CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi


Travel bro:p. You'll feel better about humans and realize merica is just in a rough spot right now
 
2018-01-12 04:35:42 PM  

bigdanc: CygnusDarius: Can I so in the probe? I'm tired of this planet.

/I don't need much
//Just food, water, and wifi

Travel bro:p. You'll feel better about humans and realize merica is just in a rough spot right now


This is Voyager 1.  At ~13 billion miles from the Sun, it is the furthest man made object from Earth

Lucky bastard

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-12 04:53:31 PM  
If you go that fast, you're going to get a ticket.
 
2018-01-12 05:28:31 PM  

Johnny the Tackling Alzheimers Patient: Tr0mBoNe: freidog: Tr0mBoNe: Making something get close to the sun requires a lot of change in velocity. That's why I always laugh when someone wants to fire something into the sun. It would be easier to put it on the ocean floor near a subduction zone and let geological processes take over.

/Quality headline, substein.

A preferred method for getting a solar flyby is actually using a gravity assist around Jupiter to slow down.
It takes less delta V to launch up to Jupiter's orbit and use its massive gravity well to slow down to your final perihelion than it does to sit at Earth orbit and slow down all on your own.

Ulysses was last solar probe to do that (though its job was to map the polar regions of the sun so it mainly used Jupiter to do a plane change and kick itself up to around 80 degrees off the ecliptic).

The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.  Solar Parker is going to use somewhere around 7 flybys of Venus to gradually drop its perihelion until it's making a close approach to the sun every 3 months or so.

Meanwhile, in KSP I killed a couple guys by crashing them into the sun when I was trying to put a station into low solar orbit.

I prefer the single slingshot method, but wasn't the high eccentricity of the Ulysses mission a requirement and not a limitation of the maneuver? Like, couldn't they have done the same thing without going out of the ecliptic?

I bring it up because I did the same thing in kerbal and empty low orbit.

/loves killing kerbals

If you want to go full astro-nerd, try the boardgame High Frontier:
[cf.geekdo-images.com image 850x566]The line on the map aren't orbits, they are "paths" between objects in the solar system reflecting the ease of getting something from A to B. Each junction reflects a point where fuel is needed to alter the actual path of the spacecraft.


I still have this old classic.
cf.geekdo-images.comView Full Size

Not nearly as nerdy as High Frontier, but what can you expect from Monopoly ...in SPAAACCEE.
 
2018-01-12 06:33:26 PM  

germ78: I still have this old classic.

Not nearly as nerdy as High Frontier, but what can you expect from Monopoly ...in SPAAACCEE.

Nothing's as nerdy as High Frontier
cf.geekdo-images.comView Full Size

Seen SolarQuest in a few thrift stores over the years. There was also the TSR Buck Rogers game (Axis & Allies in SPAAAACCEE) where the planets and asteroids were tracked in simple orbits, meaning that launching invasion fleets had to be timed with their relative positions.
cf.geekdo-images.comView Full Size
 
2018-01-12 07:57:37 PM  

Flt209er: freidog: The downside is of course this leaves you in a highly elliptical orbit and you only get down close to the sun every few years.

Ulysses never got close to the sun. Perihelion was farther out than Earth's orbit. The mission was mainly about seeing the suns poles. Thus:

Tr0mBoNe: Like, couldn't they have done the same thing without going out of the ecliptic?

the answer to this is no. If you eliminate the need to alter the inclination, then Jupiter becomes of no use. Using Jupiter can drop perihelion over time, but conservation of energy still requires aphelion to extend to Jupiter's orbit. This is the same thing that allows them to use Venus multiple times. But to decrease both aphelion and perihelion, you need to do at least two different trajectory altering maneuvers.


That's why I have you farkied as "space cadet"
 
2018-01-12 07:58:30 PM  
Umm, subby, the sun is not the center of the universe.
 
2018-01-12 07:59:08 PM  
Oh crap, solar system.  Never mind.
 
2018-01-12 09:50:20 PM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size

PARKER! Get me more pictures of the Spider-Sun.

 
2018-01-13 12:20:13 AM  
Considering that NASA wants to launch a probe in 2069 that can travel at one tenth the speed of light, this would be a major stepping stone.
 
2018-01-13 08:41:36 AM  
Why do we park in a driveway, drive on a parkway, and call something parker that's going 430,000mph?

/worked for lab that built the FIELDS instruments.
//but worked on other stuff, not Parker stuff.
///still has a Parker patch and stickers... somewhere.
////knows where to get t-shirts, too, has to decide whether to order any, deadline is Jan 19th
//tired of all these motherfarking slashies on this motherfarking comment
 
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