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(Quartz)   Serena Williams almost loses her life after giving birth because hospital staff didn't believe her   ( qz.com) divider line
    More: Scary, blood clots, Black people, American women, small blood clots, Serena Williams, African American, youngest Vogue cover, Olympia Ohanian Jr  
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1484 clicks; posted to Sports » on 11 Jan 2018 at 8:49 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-01-11 04:46:45 PM  
Who knew St Marys was a shiathole?
 
2018-01-11 04:49:26 PM  
This article is so histrionic.

The medical staff didn't immediately start "her orders" because she isn't a medical professional and they needed to confirm the diagnosis before proper treatment.  If she had been a white non-medical professional, her treatment would have been exactly the same.
 
2018-01-11 08:05:56 PM  
California wanted to reduce maternal deaths. They figured out what was wrong and created the right protocols to fix it. Now they are publicizing their efforts so other delivery centers use the same/similar protocols. Huh, science saves lives.
 
2018-01-11 08:08:53 PM  
This doesn't surprise me.  Finding a doctor who will actually listen to what you're feeling/reacting to medication (especially if it's not supposed to do that!) is pretty difficult.
 
2018-01-11 08:49:37 PM  

Angry Manatee: This article is so histrionic.

The medical staff didn't immediately start "her orders" because she isn't a medical professional and they needed to confirm the diagnosis before proper treatment.  If she had been a white non-medical professional, her treatment would have been exactly the same.


They didn't have much time for playing around. My sister was taken to the hospital with a PE. She chatted with the EMTs when they picked her up, lost consciousness on the way to the hospital, and was declared dead 45 minutes after she was admitted. She never opened her eyes in the hospital.
 
2018-01-11 09:21:20 PM  
Serena Williams almost loses her life after giving birth because hospital staff didn't believe her
Pick one tense, subby, and stick with it. Please.
 
2018-01-11 09:25:43 PM  
Indeed, even Serena Williams, whose body, as her husband correctly notes, "is one of the greatest things on this planet," is just another black woman when it comes to being heard in the maternity ward-and when it comes to being dismissed.

What a load of shiat. 99 times out of 100 if you do what the patient insists is needed, you are doing the wrong thing.

She wasn't "just another black woman" she was just another patient who thinks they know best. In this case, she was the 1 in 100 who was correct.

I don't doubt that black women get sub-par care and aren't listened to, but this wasn't a case of that.
 
2018-01-11 09:31:44 PM  
Holy shiat! A woman complains of shortness of breath soon after delivery, and alarm bells don't ring? A woman who is a certified world class athlete complaining of breathing problems.
The only way to spin this is that the staff was trying to calm her while engaging the immediate diagnostic/therapeutic process. Is it possible that Serena misinterpreted reassurance as dismissal?
BTW, maternal death rates in the US are 3-4 times Europe and Japan. We should be working to correct this. The death of a young mother is a tragedy. I want my country to lead in preventing this.
 
2018-01-11 09:36:50 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Serena Williams almost loses her life after giving birth because hospital staff didn't believe her
Pick one tense, subby, and stick with it. Please.


Mrs. Jones?  Is that you?  My 6th grade grammar teacher?
 
2018-01-11 09:49:26 PM  

thisdaydreamer: They didn't have much time for playing around. My sister was taken to the hospital with a PE. She chatted with the EMTs when they picked her up, lost consciousness on the way to the hospital, and was declared dead 45 minutes after she was admitted. She never opened her eyes in the hospital.


I'm sorry that your sister suffered a poor outcome.

I'm ain ER nurse at a level 1 trauma center. Some people can live for days with a PE, some people die within minutes. As medical professionals, we have to know what is wrong before we try and fix it, not just take the patients word for it.

The problem is, that a Heparin drip isn't just something you start. You need an initial PTT, you need a targeted PTT, it would be extremely helpful if you have a chest Xray, a CT-angio of the chest, and had ruled out amniotic embolism, which in a post-partum patient, isn't totally out of the question.

Look at me go! An actual medical professional (not even L&D) bringing up actual medical concerns instead of just jumping in and following a patient's verbal orders!

If Mrs. Williams had been suffering from an amniotic fluid embolism instead of a blood clot, and the staff had "started a heparin drip" without knowing what the loading dose was going to be, and she died, the histrionic article would be talking about how these terrible "probably caucasian" medical providers killed a beloved black athlete because RACISM!

Instead, we get to read about a team of medical providers who listened to their patient, ran appropriate tests, and then fixed the farking problem.

SMH
 
2018-01-11 10:18:20 PM  
Serena Williams is a physical paradox.  At 36 years, she is one of the most remarkably physically fit athletes ever.  And once she loses the baby fat and is able to train, etc., she'll probably win another grand slam or two.

Yet she has this weird history of developing blood clots and hematomas which have almost killed her on several occasions.

For someone so healthy, Serena Williams has some farkin' scary health issues.
 
2018-01-11 11:02:48 PM  

wichitaleaf: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Serena Williams almost loses her life after giving birth because hospital staff didn't believe her
Pick one tense, subby, and stick with it. Please.

Mrs. Jones?  Is that you?  My 6th grade grammar teacher?


Sometimes people need reminders of things they learned a long time ago but forgot.
/ That's the kind version.  The other version is "Sometimes people need to learn things they should have learned a long time ago."
 
2018-01-11 11:16:02 PM  
That's a huge biatch
 
2018-01-11 11:40:06 PM  

wichitaleaf: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Serena Williams almost loses her life after giving birth because hospital staff didn't believe her
Pick one tense, subby, and stick with it. Please.

Mrs. Jones?  Is that you?  My 6th grade grammar teacher?


It took you until sixth grade to learn present tense vs. past tense? Did you go to grade school in Mississippi?
 
2018-01-12 05:31:25 AM  

Angry Manatee: thisdaydreamer: They didn't have much time for playing around. My sister was taken to the hospital with a PE. She chatted with the EMTs when they picked her up, lost consciousness on the way to the hospital, and was declared dead 45 minutes after she was admitted. She never opened her eyes in the hospital.

I'm sorry that your sister suffered a poor outcome.

I'm ain ER nurse at a level 1 trauma center. Some people can live for days with a PE, some people die within minutes. As medical professionals, we have to know what is wrong before we try and fix it, not just take the patients word for it.

The problem is, that a Heparin drip isn't just something you start. You need an initial PTT, you need a targeted PTT, it would be extremely helpful if you have a chest Xray, a CT-angio of the chest, and had ruled out amniotic embolism, which in a post-partum patient, isn't totally out of the question.

Look at me go! An actual medical professional (not even L&D) bringing up actual medical concerns instead of just jumping in and following a patient's verbal orders!

If Mrs. Williams had been suffering from an amniotic fluid embolism instead of a blood clot, and the staff had "started a heparin drip" without knowing what the loading dose was going to be, and she died, the histrionic article would be talking about how these terrible "probably caucasian" medical providers killed a beloved black athlete because RACISM!

Instead, we get to read about a team of medical providers who listened to their patient, ran appropriate tests, and then fixed the farking problem.

SMH


But if a patient says she is showing symptoms of a deadly condition that she'd had before, shouldn't that be the first thing the doctors test for? The first tests they ran couldn't diagnose a PE, so why didn't they start with something that could?
 
2018-01-12 09:08:38 AM  
thisdaydreamer:

But if a patient says she is showing symptoms of a deadly condition that she'd had before, shouldn't that be the first thing the doctors test for? The first tests they ran couldn't diagnose a PE, so why didn't they start with something that could?

Why bother?  It's obvious that the internet medical experts here know more than Serena.  I mean, shiat, they are internet medical experts after all and she's just one of the top athletes in the world who understands her body better than any of them.

They started with the tests they did because it's obvious... she didn't know what she was talking about. /s
 
2018-01-12 09:15:10 AM  
It's funny to see the same farkers who blindly believe what academia and "their team's" politicians say turn around and say that experienced doctors should defer to an athlete's medical "expertise".
 
2018-01-12 10:20:20 AM  

thisdaydreamer: But if a patient says she is showing symptoms of a deadly condition that she'd had before, shouldn't that be the first thing the doctors test for? The first tests they ran couldn't diagnose a PE, so why didn't they start with something that could?


Then the hospital cant put the useless procedure on the bill to her insurance company.
 
2018-01-12 11:45:44 AM  

Angry Manatee: This article is so histrionic.

The medical staff didn't immediately start "her orders" because she isn't a medical professional and they needed to confirm the diagnosis before proper treatment.  If she had been a white non-medical professional, her treatment would have been exactly the same.


C'mon, man. It was because she's black.
 
2018-01-12 11:50:22 AM  

Christian Bale: Indeed, even Serena Williams, whose body, as her husband correctly notes, "is one of the greatest things on this planet," is just another black woman when it comes to being heard in the maternity ward-and when it comes to being dismissed.

What a load of shiat. 99 times out of 100 if you do what the patient insists is needed, you are doing the wrong thing.

She wasn't "just another black woman" she was just another patient who thinks they know best. In this case, she was the 1 in 100 who was correct.

I don't doubt that black women get sub-par care and aren't listened to, but this wasn't a case of that.


There's a world of difference between random patient X who wants attention and is bossy, and patient SW who has an extensively documented medical history of blood clotting issues and has experienced them before, and whose demonstrated symptoms match up with a PE blood clot who is telling you that she can't breathe.  Either there was a terrible hand-off of the patient between staff or they were too damn lazy to educate themselves on the patient's medical history.  If they had even a passing understanding of the patient, they should have been assuming PE blood clot instead of presuming the opposite.
 
2018-01-12 12:36:14 PM  

thisdaydreamer: But if a patient says she is showing symptoms of a deadly condition that she'd had before, shouldn't that be the first thing the doctors test for? The first tests they ran couldn't diagnose a PE, so why didn't they start with something that could?


The very limited report of what diagnostics and exams were performed validates that the medical team treated her appropriately.

They did a venous doppler of the lower legs.  This is a quick bedside procedure that can be performed without trying to fit someone into the queue for the CT scanner.  That revealed nothing, so they moved into a more invasive scan.  They then discovered the problem and treated her.

When a patient tells me "I know my body...I need X / Y / & Z", I find that they're correct about 33% of the time.  If doctors just performed a treatment without every verifying the medical necessity for that treatment, medical resources would be so overused that people would die from the traffic jam.  How would you feel if someone who demanded an unnecessary CT scan tied up the CT required to detect a stroke your spouse was having?  Doctors would be irresponsible to just take the word of a patient on narcotic pain medications without any independent exam.
 
2018-01-12 02:49:48 PM  

Angry Manatee: thisdaydreamer: But if a patient says she is showing symptoms of a deadly condition that she'd had before, shouldn't that be the first thing the doctors test for? The first tests they ran couldn't diagnose a PE, so why didn't they start with something that could?

The very limited report of what diagnostics and exams were performed validates that the medical team treated her appropriately.

They did a venous doppler of the lower legs.  This is a quick bedside procedure that can be performed without trying to fit someone into the queue for the CT scanner.  That revealed nothing, so they moved into a more invasive scan.  They then discovered the problem and treated her.

When a patient tells me "I know my body...I need X / Y / & Z", I find that they're correct about 33% of the time.  If doctors just performed a treatment without every verifying the medical necessity for that treatment, medical resources would be so overused that people would die from the traffic jam.  How would you feel if someone who demanded an unnecessary CT scan tied up the CT required to detect a stroke your spouse was having?  Doctors would be irresponsible to just take the word of a patient on narcotic pain medications without any independent exam.


There was no point in doing the venous doppler of the lower legs.  She has a documented history of blood clots and PE and is normally on a daily regimen of anticoagulants, and she had just had surgery the previous day.  While PE can be a complication of DVT, she wasn't complaining of any leg pain, had no swelling of the legs or other symptoms of DVT, where as the sudden shortness of breath, the primary symptom, is a giant red flag for PE in patients with a history of blood clots.  If they wanted to check other causes of SoB like myocardial infarction by running an ECG, that would have made more sense than the venous doppler.
  If anything, the doppler should have been a follow up test to verify there weren't additional clots forming in the legs.
 
2018-01-12 05:05:12 PM  
A CT takes an order, a venous doppler doesn't.  You can do a quick doppler at bedside, justify the CT, then call radiology and see how fast you can get the patient in.
Anyone with inpatient acute care experience understands these things.
They also DID do a CT, and obviously in time to find the PE.

Yes, a patient with a Hx of clots & PE should have raised red flags.  Where in the article does it say the staff didn't treat her for a PE?

The article doesn't mention labs, doesn't mention a 12-lead,doesn't mention medications, and doesn't mention a timeline.
 
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