Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Eat Sip Trip)   Not yo grandma's cinnamon. Seriously. You've been eating fake cinnamon your entire life   ( eatsiptrip.10best.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Cinnamon, Saigon cinnamon, Saigon cinnamon bark, Ceylon cinnamon, Sri Lanka, available ground cinnamon, sharp cinnamon flavor, wrong cinnamon  
•       •       •

2567 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jan 2018 at 1:20 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



55 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2018-01-03 01:03:55 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 01:05:07 PM  
And probably fake vanilla.
 
2018-01-03 01:12:41 PM  
It blew my mind when I found out that the primary flavour in Coca Cola is cinnamon (Cassia, actually)
 
2018-01-03 01:31:25 PM  
Americans sure love their fake shiat, don't they.
 
2018-01-03 01:35:37 PM  
Nice to see that the US's 'War On Everyone' still aids economies, decades after they leave.

'Saigon' Cinnamon is now a rare and expensive commodity, compared to other cinnamons, directly because of US war involvement.

Thanks, Obama.
 
2018-01-03 01:36:31 PM  

Smoking GNU: Americans sure love their fake shiat, don't they.


Well, they didn't really have that much to vote between.

wait...
 
2018-01-03 01:39:56 PM  
Oh, and regardless of which geographical location it comes from, it's still the reason the Jamaican was sent to jail. - HE WAS A CINNA MON

/myself out
//I sees it.
 
2018-01-03 01:48:44 PM  
It's still a species of Cinnamon.
 
2018-01-03 01:52:15 PM  
Meh, serious spice stores have been showing the difference between the different cinnamons for a LOOOONG time.  You know if you're getting a variety from China, Vietnam, or Indonesia.  Chinese and Vietnamese good, Indonesian bad.  Easy peasy.
 
2018-01-03 01:53:51 PM  
So that's why my molasses cookies don't taste quite as good as my grandmother's did.

It's funny, though, that our kids, who never tasted her molasses cookies, think my version is the best in the world.

/sent them each a box for Christmas.
 
2018-01-03 02:06:57 PM  
🎶 Sneakin' down your alleyway
And knockin' on your door
Thought I had enough
Bur I'm back for more 🎶
 
2018-01-03 02:08:18 PM  
So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?
 
2018-01-03 02:11:08 PM  
In the US, the best move is always to get the cellophane-bagged spices from the "Foreign Foods" aisle. In California, it's usually spices imported from Mexico, and you get decent quality stuff for frappin' pennies.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 02:11:38 PM  
Penzey's carries all 4 types. From small jars to 1 lb bags of the stuff.  Very potent and cheaper than your supermarket.
 
2018-01-03 02:13:38 PM  

sunderland56: So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?


"Different" wouldn't have gotten clicks.

/ didn't click
 
2018-01-03 02:20:15 PM  

BKITU: In the US, the best move is always to get the cellophane-bagged spices from the "Foreign Foods" aisle. In California, it's usually spices imported from Mexico, and you get decent quality stuff for frappin' pennies.

img.fark.netView Full Size


Nice to see that he's doing well for himself.  I'd say that's a plethora of spices.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 02:20:23 PM  

MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.


Almost definitely fake vanilla.

Real vanilla is expensive, and the difference is only noticeable if you are making something that is primarily "vanilla flavored". If you just want a hint of vanilla, the fake stuff is fine.

But real vanilla...man, it's good on anything sweet. I mix in a little bit with cereal, sometimes.
 
2018-01-03 02:27:16 PM  
"Real" vs "fake" cinnamon is a mild difference in flavor. Having grown up on "fake" cinnamon, "real" cinnamon tastes slightly off to me.

It's nothing like the difference in flavor between real Maple syrup and whatever corn sugar dyed brown stuff they sell in the supermarket.
 
2018-01-03 02:29:41 PM  

MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.


I got on the "real vanilla" train when I went to Mexico. I get beans, and use them for vanilla sugar. And I get real vanilla. So yummy.
 
2018-01-03 02:42:42 PM  
Huh, we have been using Vietnamese cinnamon for a few years just by accident.  Got some once and it was so much better we switched, had no idea it was different things entirely.
 
2018-01-03 02:48:20 PM  

meat0918: It's still a species of Cinnamon.


I was going to say. It's Cinnamomum cassia. It's one of five species used, mostly interchangeably, as a spice.

It's like "Szechuan pepper", which is made from one of three species Zanthoxylum simulans, schinifolium, and bungeanum (which has been merged into simulans). There's some evidence that all three are actually the same species, just growing in different areas. Genetic analysis of culinary supplies indicates all three are present. All three are "szechuan pepper".

Then there's Zanthoxylum piperitum (Japanese or Korean pepper) which is used almost identically, and is what's in Japanese seven-spice powder (the Japanese version of five-spice powder, because Japan is two spices better).

Go take a look at what "oranges" are. They're a motley collection of various species and hybrids, and all can trade under the culinary name of orange.
 
2018-01-03 03:24:05 PM  

sunderland56: So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?


Well a guy is trying to sell his cinnamon so saying the other stores are "fake" and his is "real" is good marketing.

Plus the article writer wouldn't get nearly as many clicks saying that it was just a different cinnamon.
 
2018-01-03 03:24:14 PM  

BKITU: In the US, the best move is always to get the cellophane-bagged spices from the "Foreign Foods" aisle. In California, it's usually spices imported from Mexico, and you get decent quality stuff for frappin' pennies.

[img.fark.net image 850x571]


This is the only way to buy chile pequín for guacamole. If your guacamole doesn't have it, it's just avocado-tomato mush, you filthy, uncircumcised, philistine sinner!
 
2018-01-03 03:25:57 PM  

This text is now purple: meat0918: It's still a species of Cinnamon.

I was going to say. It's Cinnamomum cassia. It's one of five species used, mostly interchangeably, as a spice.

It's like "Szechuan pepper", which is made from one of three species Zanthoxylum simulans, schinifolium, and bungeanum (which has been merged into simulans). There's some evidence that all three are actually the same species, just growing in different areas. Genetic analysis of culinary supplies indicates all three are present. All three are "szechuan pepper".

Then there's Zanthoxylum piperitum (Japanese or Korean pepper) which is used almost identically, and is what's in Japanese seven-spice powder (the Japanese version of five-spice powder, because Japan is two spices better).

Go take a look at what "oranges" are. They're a motley collection of various species and hybrids, and all can trade under the culinary name of orange.


I would put it simply that the article is akin to saying "Granny Smith" isn't real apple because when I was a kid we ate "Macintosh" apples.
 
Ant
2018-01-03 03:30:31 PM  

BKITU: In the US, the best move is always to get the cellophane-bagged spices from the "Foreign Foods" aisle. In California, it's usually spices imported from Mexico, and you get decent quality stuff for frappin' pennies.

[img.fark.net image 850x571]


Gotta love the El Guapo spices. Often in the same store, you'll find a more upper-middle-class-white-people-friend​ly versions of the same exact spices, also in cellophane bags, from some other company for twice the price.
 
2018-01-03 03:36:41 PM  

sunderland56: So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?


Holy pedantry
 
2018-01-03 03:37:57 PM  

dywed88: This text is now purple: meat0918: It's still a species of Cinnamon.

I was going to say. It's Cinnamomum cassia. It's one of five species used, mostly interchangeably, as a spice.

It's like "Szechuan pepper", which is made from one of three species Zanthoxylum simulans, schinifolium, and bungeanum (which has been merged into simulans). There's some evidence that all three are actually the same species, just growing in different areas. Genetic analysis of culinary supplies indicates all three are present. All three are "szechuan pepper".

Then there's Zanthoxylum piperitum (Japanese or Korean pepper) which is used almost identically, and is what's in Japanese seven-spice powder (the Japanese version of five-spice powder, because Japan is two spices better).

Go take a look at what "oranges" are. They're a motley collection of various species and hybrids, and all can trade under the culinary name of orange.

I would put it simply that the article is akin to saying "Granny Smith" isn't real apple because when I was a kid we ate "Macintosh" apples.


Well stated
 
2018-01-03 03:49:53 PM  
I got some good cinnamon recently, and could tell the difference in my baking.
 
2018-01-03 04:00:37 PM  
We also eat "fake" vanilla, and "fake" tomatoes.  Pumpkin filing isn't really pumpkin, it's a squash.  And "pumpkin spice" doesn't have either in it.  It's a mix of generic spices including allspice, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, and "fake" cinnamon.

Freaking out about it is a wonderful new version of the naturalistic fallacy.  Sorry to shatter your expectations.
 
2018-01-03 04:09:36 PM  

Smoking GNU: Americans sure love their fake shiat, don't they.


It's true.  As the head of a major American Faux Feces manufacturer (which will remain nameless for legal reasons), I was saddened when we had to relocate our facilities to China during the most recent Poopcession.
 
2018-01-03 04:39:14 PM  
Thanks, Ike & JFK
 
2018-01-03 04:44:58 PM  

MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.


I prefer beaver ass anyway
 
2018-01-03 04:45:46 PM  
No, I haven't.  Thankfully, there's one of these stores in my area.

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalo​g​/vietnamese-cinnamon-ground/c-24/p-955​/pd-s
 
2018-01-03 04:54:56 PM  

Khellendros: Pumpkin filing isn't really pumpkin, it's a squash.


Pumpkins are a squash.
 
2018-01-03 05:18:00 PM  

MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.


Grandma had 80 proof vanilla.
 
2018-01-03 05:43:57 PM  

Betep: MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.

Grandma had 80 proof vanilla.


My grandmother was smart enough to save the vanilla for the cookies and the vodka for drinking with the cookies.
 
2018-01-03 06:11:48 PM  

realmolo: MasterAdkins: And probably fake vanilla.

Almost definitely fake vanilla.

Real vanilla is expensive, and the difference is only noticeable if you are making something that is primarily "vanilla flavored". If you just want a hint of vanilla, the fake stuff is fine.

But real vanilla...man, it's good on anything sweet. I mix in a little bit with cereal, sometimes.


I really hated vanilla for most of my life, until I found the real stuff. I assume I have something entirely wrong with me, because I can taste fake vanilla, or fake lime in just about anything that has it no matter how small the quantity.
 
2018-01-03 06:37:06 PM  

This text is now purple: meat0918: It's still a species of Cinnamon.

I was going to say. It's Cinnamomum cassia. It's one of five species used, mostly interchangeably, as a spice.

It's like "Szechuan pepper", which is made from one of three species Zanthoxylum simulans, schinifolium, and bungeanum (which has been merged into simulans). There's some evidence that all three are actually the same species, just growing in different areas. Genetic analysis of culinary supplies indicates all three are present. All three are "szechuan pepper".

Then there's Zanthoxylum piperitum (Japanese or Korean pepper) which is used almost identically, and is what's in Japanese seven-spice powder (the Japanese version of five-spice powder, because Japan is two spices better).

Go take a look at what "oranges" are. They're a motley collection of various species and hybrids, and all can trade under the culinary name of orange.


There is actually no such thing as an orange.  They are all genetically modified fruits. Oranges aren't orange in nature either.  Green until they are gassed.
 
2018-01-03 06:45:13 PM  

lindalouwho: sunderland56: So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?

"Different" wouldn't have gotten clicks.

/ didn't click


Really, you should.  After I read some of it to my wife, she bought some Saigon cinnamon when she went to the store this afternoon.  She made us some cinnamon toast with it, and I have to say, the difference is pretty amazing.  It's a warmer, deeper flavor than the Indonesian stuff I've eaten for most of my life.
 
2018-01-03 06:48:02 PM  

paulleah: There is actually no such thing as an orange. They are all genetically modified fruits. Oranges aren't orange in nature either. Green until they are gassed.


That isn't actually true, unless you think all the orange trees in our FL neighborhood have been gassed.
 
2018-01-03 07:19:26 PM  
What a "spice" bag might look like.
i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size

The spice must flow.
 
2018-01-03 08:01:44 PM  

This text is now purple: Khellendros: Pumpkin filing isn't really pumpkin, it's a squash.

Pumpkins are a squash.


I meant it's another squash.  Typically a mixture of butternut and some others.  It's not made from pumpkin.  Most people have never actually had a pumpkin pie with actual pumpkin in it.
 
2018-01-03 08:09:28 PM  

paulleah: This text is now purple: meat0918: It's still a species of Cinnamon.

I was going to say. It's Cinnamomum cassia. It's one of five species used, mostly interchangeably, as a spice.

It's like "Szechuan pepper", which is made from one of three species Zanthoxylum simulans, schinifolium, and bungeanum (which has been merged into simulans). There's some evidence that all three are actually the same species, just growing in different areas. Genetic analysis of culinary supplies indicates all three are present. All three are "szechuan pepper".

Then there's Zanthoxylum piperitum (Japanese or Korean pepper) which is used almost identically, and is what's in Japanese seven-spice powder (the Japanese version of five-spice powder, because Japan is two spices better).

Go take a look at what "oranges" are. They're a motley collection of various species and hybrids, and all can trade under the culinary name of orange.

There is actually no such thing as an orange.  They are all genetically modified fruits. Oranges aren't orange in nature either.  Green until they are gassed.


They are hybridized. They are still a specific plant, though.

They are also orange naturally. Many have green or yellow hues or patches and therefore the are gassed to make them more appealing, but naturally orange oranges are quite common.

This also should obvious since the colour orange was named after oranges long before ethylene gas was known. Let alone its impact on fruit.
 
2018-01-03 08:15:17 PM  

Khellendros: This text is now purple: Khellendros: Pumpkin filing isn't really pumpkin, it's a squash.

Pumpkins are a squash.

I meant it's another squash.  Typically a mixture of butternut and some others.  It's not made from pumpkin.  Most people have never actually had a pumpkin pie with actual pumpkin in it.


The definition of "pumpkin" isn't consistent. In some cases it is quite broad and would include most pumpkin pie fillings. In others it is much narrower. And in other cases the same species can be either squash or pumpkin depending on appearance.

I have had actual pumpkin pie, where I saw the pumpkin from garden to mouth. But I still rate CostCo's as one of the best out there.
 
2018-01-03 08:18:29 PM  

knobmaker: lindalouwho: sunderland56: So, two closely related botanical species; yet somehow one is deemed "real" and the other is "fake"?

"Different" wouldn't have gotten clicks.

/ didn't click

Really, you should.  After I read some of it to my wife, she bought some Saigon cinnamon when she went to the store this afternoon.  She made us some cinnamon toast with it, and I have to say, the difference is pretty amazing.  It's a warmer, deeper flavor than the Indonesian stuff I've eaten for most of my life.


Thanks, but I spent my life as a chef, I know what's up :)
 
2018-01-03 08:35:03 PM  

dywed88: The definition of "pumpkin" isn't consistent.


In the U.S. it is, in both definition and popular use.  It's not the common butternut or similar mixes that we get in pie fillings used here.  It's been faked with other squashes to create a more smooth texture.  The intent is to avoid what we call pumpkin.

But this is besides the point.  The filling isn't, nor has it been in modern memory, what we call pumpkin.  And we have this in many things we consume today.
 
2018-01-03 09:13:46 PM  

dywed88: Khellendros: This text is now purple: Khellendros: Pumpkin filing isn't really pumpkin, it's a squash.

Pumpkins are a squash.

I meant it's another squash.  Typically a mixture of butternut and some others.  It's not made from pumpkin.  Most people have never actually had a pumpkin pie with actual pumpkin in it.

The definition of "pumpkin" isn't consistent. In some cases it is quite broad and would include most pumpkin pie fillings. In others it is much narrower. And in other cases the same species can be either squash or pumpkin depending on appearance.

I have had actual pumpkin pie, where I saw the pumpkin from garden to mouth. But I still rate CostCo's as one of the best out there.



 The flatter pumpkins below made an amazing pumpkin pie in my humble opinion, but it they had a floral aroma and flavor you don't find in normal pumpkins that my kids didn't care for. I'd say sweetly perfumed and without any bitterness.


img.fark.netView Full Size


//Pic is from our yard a few years ago, the small round ones are "pie pumpkins", the larger flattish ones are musquee de provence, and the big one in back are your standard jack-o-lantern
//Costco really does make an outstanding pumpkin pie though.
 
2018-01-03 09:15:23 PM  
Wait, those were Cinderalla pumpkins.

The Musquee De Provence were another year, but both had a floral aroma and slight taste.
 
2018-01-03 10:20:27 PM  

Saturn5: What a "spice" bag might look like.
[i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x335]
The spice must flow.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-03 11:08:04 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: It blew my mind when I found out that the primary flavour in Coca Cola is cinnamon (Cassia, actually)


Well.... more a combination of  cinnamon, cardamom and lime that magically blends into the "coke" flavour.
 
Displayed 50 of 55 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report