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(TampaBay.com (St. Petersburg Tim)   Gas prices rise fifteen cents because of . . . *spins the Wheel of Excuses* . . . cold weather   ( tampabay.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Petroleum, GasBuddy petroleum analyst, Auto Club Group, gas tracker GasBuddy.com, severe cold snap, mind oil prices, State gas prices, Hydrocarbon  
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1041 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jan 2018 at 8:40 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2018-01-02 04:32:28 PM  
Real reason: Because we can, peasant.
 
2018-01-02 06:06:39 PM  
Oh cool can't wait for me need a 29 cent raise because of a warm front. I love watching oil traders talk. One days because of the threat of war it should rise. Next day because we aren't at war we will have more demand so it should go up.
 
2018-01-02 08:44:25 PM  
Neat, I remember 20 years ago how gas prices were much lower in MI winters.
 
2018-01-02 08:45:15 PM  
A 5% bump is not gonna kill you, subby. I have to put premium in my car, so it is $0.40 extra per gallon anyway.
 
2018-01-02 08:48:57 PM  
Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.
 
2018-01-02 08:50:37 PM  

SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.


20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.
 
2018-01-02 08:53:08 PM  

lack of warmth: Neat, I remember 20 years ago how gas prices were much lower in MI winters.


Funny:  When I bought my latest car two months ago, in Michigan because it is too cold there for shiat to rust, I wanted to add some fuel before trekking south.  3 farking 69 per gallon for 91 octane.

In the last two thousand miles, I haven't spent more than $3/gallon for 92 or 93 in Ohio.  I should know, this new car has fuel economy so shiatty that oil sheiks send me birthday cards, so I am an expert in what fuel prices have been lately.

/I kinda miss my 35mpg Volvo S40
/then I dip into the BOOOOOOST of the S60R and sort of forget
 
2018-01-02 09:00:51 PM  
I have a 2007 with 75000 miles, I could care less what gas costs.  I rarely drive.
 
2018-01-02 09:03:51 PM  

BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.


That's less than I remember.  OK, I would have begrudgingly took it.

I guess it was 10 years ago when it hit the $4+ range.
 
2018-01-02 09:05:39 PM  

SBinRR: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

That's less than I remember.  OK, I would have begrudgingly took it.

I guess it was 10 years ago when it hit the $4+ range.


Oddly enough the gas prices dropped right around late January 2008.
 
2018-01-02 09:10:35 PM  
Don't need the RV until May. Until then I have an EV. The seat warmers and heated steering wheel are sufficient even on the coldest of days here in FL.
 
2018-01-02 09:20:11 PM  

aseras: Don't need the RV until May. Until then I have an EV. The seat warmers and heated steering wheel are sufficient even on the coldest of days here in FL.


Meanwhile, I went to a drag race on Monday and the display on my car said it was 5F.

There were over 100 competitors.  There were people from Michigan, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

/the launch pad was glare ice, and we were bracket racing to a 20.18 time
/it was signularly the stupidest and most fun thing I have done in a long time
/was eliminated in the second round :(
 
2018-01-02 09:23:01 PM  

Mister Peejay: SBinRR: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

That's less than I remember.  OK, I would have begrudgingly took it.

I guess it was 10 years ago when it hit the $4+ range.

Oddly enough the gas prices dropped right around late January 2008.


It always costs just what we're able to pay. Funny that.
 
2018-01-02 09:37:00 PM  
It's okay. It'll go down for a week in march then rocket back up when there's a supply disruption from them switching to the "summer blend". And by "summer blend" They mean the "fark you we're raising prices blend" because fark you.
 
kab
2018-01-02 09:47:07 PM  
The higher gas prices go, the less I spend on other things.  Weird how that works.
 
2018-01-02 09:49:03 PM  

not enough beer: Oh cool can't wait for me need a 29 cent raise because of a warm front. I love watching oil traders talk. One days because of the threat of war it should rise. Next day because we aren't at war we will have more demand so it should go up.


This...

I always get a chuckle when traders talk... So full of shiat, politicians shake their heads thinking, damn, I wouldn't have tried to pull that one off....

To be fair, the price of gas at the Kroger here in Cartersville actually dropped 16 cents in a day late last week. I remember thinking to myself, "this makes no sense...." but no complaints...
 
2018-01-02 10:13:51 PM  

BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.


What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989
 
2018-01-02 10:18:25 PM  
I recently went from an Ecoboost Ford Fusion to a 5.0L Mustang. I use premium fuel, it it only costs me $10 more in gas a week.

/luckily my commute is 6 miles
 
2018-01-02 10:21:52 PM  

Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989


I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.
 
2018-01-02 10:33:34 PM  

BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989

I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.


Ok, it just wasn't in the United States...they have records of that shiat on the internet you know.
 
2018-01-02 10:34:21 PM  
Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.
 
2018-01-02 10:37:04 PM  

Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989

I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.

Ok, it just wasn't in the United States...they have records of that shiat on the internet you know.


It was Las Vegas. National averages over a single year don't mean anything, I promise you, I was there and filled up my tank at $0.85/gallon.
 
2018-01-02 10:59:42 PM  
Watch how much I don't care as I drive off in my electric car in a cloud of smug.
 
2018-01-02 11:05:03 PM  

BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989

I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.

Ok, it just wasn't in the United States...they have records of that shiat on the internet you know.

It was Las Vegas. National averages over a single year don't mean anything, I promise you, I was there and filled up my tank at $0.85/gallon.



They do when you are talking about inflation and what is a reasonable price to pay for gas today.    Gas at $2.20 today is pretty damn reasonable.
 
2018-01-02 11:45:09 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2018-01-02 11:55:08 PM  

Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989

I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.

Ok, it just wasn't in the United States...they have records of that shiat on the internet you know.

It was Las Vegas. National averages over a single year don't mean anything, I promise you, I was there and filled up my tank at $0.85/gallon.


They do when you are talking about inflation and what is a reasonable price to pay for gas today.    Gas at $2.20 today is pretty damn reasonable.


So, are you saying 85 cents is impossible based on the AVERAGE ? Because that isn't how math works. Did your research say nothing was under a certain amount? Also, did it include state taxes, or raw pricing?
 
2018-01-03 12:06:31 AM  

AppleOptionEsc: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: Vaginosilicosis: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

What?  No.   The average US gas price in 1997 was $1.20 and $1.05 in 1998

Even living near 3 refineries in Wyoming I didn't see $0.85 a gallon any time after 1989

I started driving in 1997, and gas was less than a dollar, by a good amount.

Ok, it just wasn't in the United States...they have records of that shiat on the internet you know.

It was Las Vegas. National averages over a single year don't mean anything, I promise you, I was there and filled up my tank at $0.85/gallon.


They do when you are talking about inflation and what is a reasonable price to pay for gas today.    Gas at $2.20 today is pretty damn reasonable.

So, are you saying 85 cents is impossible based on the AVERAGE ? Because that isn't how math works. Did your research say nothing was under a certain amount? Also, did it include state taxes, or raw pricing?


NOOOOOOO,  I'm saying the anecdote of one dude, in one place, has fark-all to do with national averages.    His Boobies was saying "gas was only .85 cents 20 years ago", but that wasn't true for the vast majority of people, so it means nothing.
 
2018-01-03 12:07:45 AM  

SBinRR: BadReligion: SBinRR: Regular is around 2.20/gallon around here.  If you would have asked me 20 years ago if I'd be good with that price in 2018, I would have jumped all over it.

20 years ago, gas was $0.85/gallon. I remember it cost $10 to fill my Volvo.

That's less than I remember.  OK, I would have begrudgingly took it.

I guess it was 10 years ago when it hit the $4+ range.


Summer of 08 was when it flew up to the $4 range across the country.

20 years ago gas wasn't $0.85, it was $1.00, occasionally dropping to $0.95, and occasionally spiking to $1.15.

/Remember buying a truck with a 40 gallon fuel tank in 2002 and having to go to the bank to take money out because "I might have to fill both tanks and that's gonna hurt." (At $1.05)
//Guy sold me the truck with a full gas tank, I think I put $1.50 in topping off
 
2018-01-03 12:31:47 AM  

Mister Peejay: lack of warmth: Neat, I remember 20 years ago how gas prices were much lower in MI winters.

Funny:  When I bought my latest car two months ago, in Michigan because it is too cold there for shiat to rust, I wanted to add some fuel before trekking south.  3 farking 69 per gallon for 91 octane.

In the last two thousand miles, I haven't spent more than $3/gallon for 92 or 93 in Ohio.  I should know, this new car has fuel economy so shiatty that oil sheiks send me birthday cards, so I am an expert in what fuel prices have been lately.

/I kinda miss my 35mpg Volvo S40
/then I dip into the BOOOOOOST of the S60R and sort of forget


Funny in the manner if you don't laugh, you cry.  I'm not kidding, back in 1998 when I moved to MI, gas was 69¢/gallon in the winter, a little over a dollar in the summer.  Stayed like that till later 2000, when I was expecting my younger son.  That's when we saw it go over $1.50 for the first time, $1.69 to be exact.  I still remember being pissed about it when picking my wife back up from her doctor visit.
 
2018-01-03 12:56:01 AM  

lack of warmth: Mister Peejay: lack of warmth: Neat, I remember 20 years ago how gas prices were much lower in MI winters.

Funny:  When I bought my latest car two months ago, in Michigan because it is too cold there for shiat to rust, I wanted to add some fuel before trekking south.  3 farking 69 per gallon for 91 octane.

In the last two thousand miles, I haven't spent more than $3/gallon for 92 or 93 in Ohio.  I should know, this new car has fuel economy so shiatty that oil sheiks send me birthday cards, so I am an expert in what fuel prices have been lately.

/I kinda miss my 35mpg Volvo S40
/then I dip into the BOOOOOOST of the S60R and sort of forget

Funny in the manner if you don't laugh, you cry.  I'm not kidding, back in 1998 when I moved to MI, gas was 69¢/gallon in the winter, a little over a dollar in the summer.  Stayed like that till later 2000, when I was expecting my younger son.  That's when we saw it go over $1.50 for the first time, $1.69 to be exact.  I still remember being pissed about it when picking my wife back up from her doctor visit.


$0.69 in 1998? But the average was $1.05, so that could not be, according to some folks here.
 
2018-01-03 02:37:03 AM  
When gasoline is cold it is more dense and contains more energy per gallon than it does during warm weather. Is that enough to make up for the $0.15 per gallon increase? Possibly, but I'm not in the mood to figure out the math to prove it.
 
2018-01-03 09:31:06 AM  

BadReligion: $0.69 in 1998? But the average was $1.05, so that could not be, according to some folks here


Gosh, I never saw it dip below $1.35 in Oregon for the whole of the 90's which is impossible according to some folks here.

You are bad at math and don't understand the difference between an isolated location and a national average.
 
2018-01-03 10:35:12 AM  

BadReligion: lack of warmth: Mister Peejay: lack of warmth: Neat, I remember 20 years ago how gas prices were much lower in MI winters.

Funny:  When I bought my latest car two months ago, in Michigan because it is too cold there for shiat to rust, I wanted to add some fuel before trekking south.  3 farking 69 per gallon for 91 octane.

In the last two thousand miles, I haven't spent more than $3/gallon for 92 or 93 in Ohio.  I should know, this new car has fuel economy so shiatty that oil sheiks send me birthday cards, so I am an expert in what fuel prices have been lately.

/I kinda miss my 35mpg Volvo S40
/then I dip into the BOOOOOOST of the S60R and sort of forget

Funny in the manner if you don't laugh, you cry.  I'm not kidding, back in 1998 when I moved to MI, gas was 69¢/gallon in the winter, a little over a dollar in the summer.  Stayed like that till later 2000, when I was expecting my younger son.  That's when we saw it go over $1.50 for the first time, $1.69 to be exact.  I still remember being pissed about it when picking my wife back up from her doctor visit.

$0.69 in 1998? But the average was $1.05, so that could not be, according to some folks here.


It was a shock to me too, till other longer MI residents at the time said it was a normal thing in the winter.
 
2018-01-03 12:38:03 PM  

Cataholic: Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.


This ^^^^  There is a fungible resource (oil) that can be made into gasoline, heating oil, plastics, diesel (power generation).  A huge spike in demand on one of these will mean less of it for other uses causing prices to rise.  It's not difficult to understand and it's not a conspiracy by big business to cheat you.
 
2018-01-03 07:48:08 PM  

CivicMindedFive: Cataholic: Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.

This ^^^^  There is a fungible resource (oil) that can be made into gasoline, heating oil, plastics, diesel (power generation).  A huge spike in demand on one of these will mean less of it for other uses causing prices to rise.  It's not difficult to understand and it's not a conspiracy by big business to cheat you.


From what I understood about crude oil distilling, that is not how it works.  Each barrel separates into different products, not made into one or the other.  In fact, the heating oil you're talking about is completely wrong.  Back in the day when heating oil was being produced, and cars didn't exist, gasoline was dumped as a waste product.  It is not part of heating oil.  The part of crude oil to make tar is also not something that can be used to make gasoline, kerosene, or heating oil.  Each product is not capable of being used to make a different product.  Look up petroleum refining processes on wiki, it shows the weight plays a part into what part of crude oil makes what product.  Gasoline is in the light distillations, while heating oil is in the middle weight range.
 
2018-01-03 07:53:05 PM  

lack of warmth: CivicMindedFive: Cataholic: Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.

This ^^^^  There is a fungible resource (oil) that can be made into gasoline, heating oil, plastics, diesel (power generation).  A huge spike in demand on one of these will mean less of it for other uses causing prices to rise.  It's not difficult to understand and it's not a conspiracy by big business to cheat you.

From what I understood about crude oil distilling, that is not how it works.  Each barrel separates into different products, not made into one or the other.  In fact, the heating oil you're talking about is completely wrong.  Back in the day when heating oil was being produced, and cars didn't exist, gasoline was dumped as a waste product.  It is not part of heating oil.  The part of crude oil to make tar is also not something that can be used to make gasoline, kerosene, or heating oil.  Each product is not capable of being used to make a different product.  Look up petroleum refining processes on wiki, it shows the weight plays a part into what part of crude oil makes what product.  Gasoline is in the light distillations, while heating oil is in the middle weight range.


I should add, if the demand for heating oil is causing production to pick up, the cost of gas should come down.  When you take into account they're getting the barrel paid by not just heating oil, but diesel, propane, kerosene, motor oil, tar, .........

Point is, subby was right, it's the Spin the Wheel of Excuses.
 
2018-01-03 11:01:52 PM  

lack of warmth: CivicMindedFive: Cataholic: Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.

This ^^^^  There is a fungible resource (oil) that can be made into gasoline, heating oil, plastics, diesel (power generation).  A huge spike in demand on one of these will mean less of it for other uses causing prices to rise.  It's not difficult to understand and it's not a conspiracy by big business to cheat you.

From what I understood about crude oil distilling, that is not how it works.  Each barrel separates into different products, not made into one or the other.  In fact, the heating oil you're talking about is completely wrong.  Back in the day when heating oil was being produced, and cars didn't exist, gasoline was dumped as a waste product.  It is not part of heating oil.  The part of crude oil to make tar is also not something that can be used to make gasoline, kerosene, or heating oil.  Each product is not capable of being used to make a different product.  Look up petroleum refining processes on wiki, it shows the weight plays a part into what part of crude oil makes what product.  Gasoline is in the light distillations, while heating oil is in the middle weight range.


What you describe is really the "thermal" part of the process.  Refiners can take some of those first-run distillates and send them through a secondary chemical catalytic process and then blend the resulting products in various ways to change the output percentages between gasoline and the heavier stuff.

On top of that, there are about 70 or 80 different varieties of crude oil, each of which produce slightly different fractions.  Some of the refiners (if the price gets too far out of whack) will even switch their raw feedstock to produce more heating oil/diesel.
 
2018-01-04 01:00:45 AM  

Cataholic: lack of warmth: CivicMindedFive: Cataholic: Dear Subby:

Cold weather is the most legitimate excuse for an increase in gasoline prices.  The refineries switch their outputs to produce more heating oil from each barrel of crude (less catalytic cracking, meaning less gasoline and more fuel oil).  Production of gasoline can drop as much as 10-15% as a result.

This ^^^^  There is a fungible resource (oil) that can be made into gasoline, heating oil, plastics, diesel (power generation).  A huge spike in demand on one of these will mean less of it for other uses causing prices to rise.  It's not difficult to understand and it's not a conspiracy by big business to cheat you.

From what I understood about crude oil distilling, that is not how it works.  Each barrel separates into different products, not made into one or the other.  In fact, the heating oil you're talking about is completely wrong.  Back in the day when heating oil was being produced, and cars didn't exist, gasoline was dumped as a waste product.  It is not part of heating oil.  The part of crude oil to make tar is also not something that can be used to make gasoline, kerosene, or heating oil.  Each product is not capable of being used to make a different product.  Look up petroleum refining processes on wiki, it shows the weight plays a part into what part of crude oil makes what product.  Gasoline is in the light distillations, while heating oil is in the middle weight range.

What you describe is really the "thermal" part of the process.  Refiners can take some of those first-run distillates and send them through a secondary chemical catalytic process and then blend the resulting products in various ways to change the output percentages between gasoline and the heavier stuff.

On top of that, there are about 70 or 80 different varieties of crude oil, each of which produce slightly different fractions.  Some of the refiners (if the price gets too far out of whack) will even switch their raw feedstock to p ...


Except heating fuel is a close cousin to diesel, not gasoline.  They can produce either diesel or heating oil, but gasoline isn't close enough to be involved in that equation.  Do you really think 19th century crude oil distilleries would've thrown away gasoline if they could've used it to make heating oil?  They convinced people that petroleum jelly was a health product, why would they throw away something they thought they could use?  None of this is new, they found a way to use every ounce with plastics, decades ago; long before these ridiculous price gouging.
 
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