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(Deadline)   What went right [Wonder Woman; The Last Jedi; Guardians of the Galaxy 2] and what went wrong [Justice League; Baywatch; The Room] at the box office in 2017   ( deadline.com) divider line
    More: Followup, 20th century fox, box office, marketshare, Star Wars Story, annual marketshare, domestic box office, old Walt Disney, lowest domestic takes  
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1757 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 31 Dec 2017 at 5:02 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-12-31 01:23:43 PM  
I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.
 
2017-12-31 02:46:48 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.


I went in with zero expectations and was completely entertained by the ridiculousness of it.
 
2017-12-31 03:15:38 PM  

ltnor: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

I went in with zero expectations and was completely entertained by the ridiculousness of it.


I watched it on a trans atlantic flight (love you Delta!). After I figured out what they were going for I enjoyed the movie.
 
2017-12-31 04:13:00 PM  
I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.
 
2017-12-31 04:41:52 PM  

davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.


Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.
 
2017-12-31 05:02:07 PM  

czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


I was sadly surprised my parents weren't familiar with it, but I guess I'm more of a WW2 reader than they are. Since they were teachers though, maybe nobody else heard of it either?
 
2017-12-31 05:09:06 PM  

czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


Not taught in Canada in the 80's/early 90's. I only reason I learned of it was when I was ... "correcting"... Americans online about how WWII actually went down. This was just after Saving Private Ryan came out, and America - FARK YEAH!!! was the norm on online forums that discussed movies.

There is a LOT about WWII that isn't taught across the pond. Even in the Commonwealth allies like Canada.
 
2017-12-31 05:09:50 PM  
The Room

The hell is subby talking about?
 
2017-12-31 05:17:47 PM  

czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


Not really.  We gloss over WWI and the War of 1812 as well.
 
2017-12-31 05:19:07 PM  
So how many farking people drowned making Dunkirk?
That movie was horrifying
 
2017-12-31 05:21:05 PM  

Techhell: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

Not taught in Canada in the 80's/early 90's. I only reason I learned of it was when I was ... "correcting"... Americans online about how WWII actually went down. This was just after Saving Private Ryan came out, and America - FARK YEAH!!! was the norm on online forums that discussed movies.

There is a LOT about WWII that isn't taught across the pond. Even in the Commonwealth allies like Canada.


We had a great history teacher, and she taught us little known WWII episodes that wasn't in the national curriculum, like the background to this strange photo:
static2.hypable.comView Full Size
 
2017-12-31 05:22:22 PM  

Techhell: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

Not taught in Canada in the 80's/early 90's. I only reason I learned of it was when I was ... "correcting"... Americans online about how WWII actually went down. This was just after Saving Private Ryan came out, and America - FARK YEAH!!! was the norm on online forums that discussed movies.

There is a LOT about WWII that isn't taught across the pond. Even in the Commonwealth allies like Canada.


I heard about Dunkirk in my grade 12 class (late 80's) in Canada.
 
2017-12-31 05:22:30 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.


"haha, I bet this will be garbage.  I'm going to give them money.  I'm not at all garbage myself".
 
2017-12-31 05:23:05 PM  
Justice League was way better than The Last Jedi. It wasn't another Wonder Woman but it was decent.

The Last Jedi sucked. They wasted Mark Hamill and Luke Skywalker. It was full of so many why didn't they do that sooner, why did they wait so long, wtf are these idiots doing. What glimmer of hope the force awakens had going for the new star wars universe is gone. All they apparently want is some cute/stupid animal to merchandise in every new Lucasfilm.
 
2017-12-31 05:23:20 PM  

GungFu: We had a great history teacher, and she taught us little known WWII episodes that wasn't in the national curriculum, like the background to this strange photo:


That photo is from WWI.
 
2017-12-31 05:23:28 PM  

davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.


I kind of want to wait until Darkest Hour is on Blu-Ray and watch them as double feature.
 
2017-12-31 05:25:40 PM  

Tourney3p0: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

"haha, I bet this will be garbage.  I'm going to give them money.  I'm not at all garbage myself".


I saw like 3 Pauly Shore movies in the theater as a kid
Both Deuce Bigolo movies
I'm going to see Tyler Perry presents St Madea-trick's Day on opening night just to piss you off
 
2017-12-31 05:25:51 PM  

Techhell: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

Not taught in Canada in the 80's/early 90's. I only reason I learned of it was when I was ... "correcting"... Americans online about how WWII actually went down. This was just after Saving Private Ryan came out, and America - FARK YEAH!!! was the norm on online forums that discussed movies.

There is a LOT about WWII that isn't taught across the pond. Even in the Commonwealth allies like Canada.


It might shock you that all of British history isn't taught in American schools.  We mostly concern ourselves with taxation without representation and violent consequences resulting from it. :)

Dunkirk was a good movie.  The Brits are tough blokes.

/well except for the Leavers.  Way to sink your country numb skulls!
 
2017-12-31 05:26:22 PM  
The Room? Do you mean The Disaster Artist?
 
2017-12-31 05:29:17 PM  

Mad_Radhu: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

I kind of want to wait until Darkest Hour is on Blu-Ray and watch them as double feature.


I forgot about that movie. I'll have to check that one out.
 
2017-12-31 05:31:30 PM  

Thong_of_Zardoz: GungFu: We had a great history teacher, and she taught us little known WWII episodes that wasn't in the national curriculum, like the background to this strange photo:

That photo is from WWI.


Really?! Are you sure? Miss Dunion, my history teacher, said the photo was taken on Halloween during Operation Market Garden. Some Dutch comedy actors cheering up the troops, apparently.
 
2017-12-31 05:32:45 PM  
I just saw Get Out the other night and it was damn good. It kept me guessing all the way to the end. I hope it gets awards.
 
2017-12-31 05:45:14 PM  

fusillade762: The Room

The hell is subby talking about?


Does subby maybe mean "The Disaster Artist"?

May not have been a box office smash, but there is a lot of Oscar buzz around that film.
 
2017-12-31 05:46:34 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.


It was hilarious. A great movie to have a drinks, watch, and laugh. Not everything has to be some kind of MFA cinema thesis.
 
2017-12-31 05:46:50 PM  
I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.
 
2017-12-31 05:49:48 PM  
Man I hate it when people say, "No one was asking for ______"
Well maybe no one in YOUR circle of 4 friends and your crappy blog, but I enjoy the Pirates movies and you know what? I don't have to make them. They just appear and I go see them. No hard work. Not forced to go. No skin off my OR your nose.
 
2017-12-31 05:52:52 PM  

swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.


I'm nearing 40, in Canada, and have only heard of Dunkirk with regards to the movie. It's simply not brought up much this side of the pond.
 
2017-12-31 05:54:26 PM  

JulieAzel626: fusillade762: The Room

The hell is subby talking about?

Does subby maybe mean "The Disaster Artist"?

May not have been a box office smash, but there is a lot of Oscar buzz around that film.


I thought maybe that's what was being referenced, but TFA doesn't mention Disaster Artist.
 
2017-12-31 05:57:58 PM  
FTFA No one was asking for Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Talesor Cars 3

What an incredibly superficial article. Cars mints money for Pixar. Out of all their films it contributes the most to the bottle line thanks to tie in's. The nascar crowd has money and Pixar figured out a way to tap into it.

/pirates was shiat though
 
2017-12-31 06:00:01 PM  

czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


No.

/I learned about it a history podcast several years ago
 
2017-12-31 06:03:57 PM  
Yeah, kind of been a surreal year for films... I don't think I've ever seen the performance of films correlate so strongly with whether they were actually any good or not, at least in the domestic box office.  The only one that really stands out as a complete shiat movie doing well this year is Despicable Me 17 or whatever number they're on, but I'm so far outside the target audience for that that maybe it is good and I'm just not able to see whatever elements of quality are in it.

And yeah, "Get Out" being a huge farking success is probably the most well-earned box-office success of any movie I've ever seen.  Good times.

czetie: Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


It's pretty British-specific.  Which, when you think about it, kind of makes sense, it was a strategic withdrawal of British military assets mostly... significant local interest, yes, but for everyone else the relevant bit is pretty much "and then germany gained full control of the coast".  I know that France doesn't particularly give a shiat about it either (the exchange students were like "what's that movie about, then?" when the film came out, anyhow) and I highly doubt that level of specificity comes up with any of the other allied nations either.

This isn't particularly unusual, it's not like British history lessons are going to be such that random Brits can reel off facts about, say, the Battle of the Coral Sea offhand.  And that was as significant as the Dunkirk withdrawal in military terms, arguably significantly moreso.
 
2017-12-31 06:05:47 PM  

swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.


It depends on where the person grows up. I learned a lot about Atahualpa and Huascar, Pizarro and Cortez, Bolivar and San Martin. Not a lot about WWII. And the History Channel didn't exist back then.
 
2017-12-31 06:08:23 PM  

Tourney3p0: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

"haha, I bet this will be garbage.  I'm going to give them money.  I'm not at all garbage myself".


I watched a movie.  I enjoyed it.  Boy do I have egg on my face!
 
2017-12-31 06:10:56 PM  

swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.


I bet you're a lot less familiar with the American Civil War than the average American.

Most of WW2 didn't happen here, and large parts of it happened before the US was even involved.
 
2017-12-31 06:12:13 PM  

Tannhauser: taxation without representation and violent consequences resulting from it


You mean consequences like a massively corrupt political system that serves the interests of only the wealthy and resulted in Trump, who your system prevents even his own party from removing?

So, I guess congratulations on watering a whole lot of Freedom Trees in order to end up with a worse system of governance than most of the other Colonies.   Well done.

/You too, might have had universal health care
//But I guess not paying tax is a version of "better"
 
2017-12-31 06:12:49 PM  

germ78: I just saw Get Out the other night and it was damn good. It kept me guessing all the way to the end. I hope it gets awards.


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-31 06:14:37 PM  

moothemagiccow: Tourney3p0: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

"haha, I bet this will be garbage.  I'm going to give them money.  I'm not at all garbage myself".

I saw like 3 Pauly Shore movies in the theater as a kid
Both Deuce Bigolo movies
I'm going to see Tyler Perry presents St Madea-trick's Day on opening night just to piss you off


Now you got me thinking
A) How has Tyler not made that movie, it'll make 60 mill on a 20 mill budget
B) What are great St Pattys movies? My goto is Boondock Saints
 
2017-12-31 06:14:53 PM  

czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.


No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.
 
2017-12-31 06:15:37 PM  

if_i_really_have_to: So, I guess congratulations on watering a whole lot of Freedom Trees in order to end up with a worse system of governance than most of the other Colonies.   Well done.


Lately all the watering has been reserved for the Wingnut trees.
 
2017-12-31 06:18:10 PM  

swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.


It's sad, but American history classes in general don't explain the hows and whys, just give you the barest "facts" and everything else you learn is YO JOE AMERICA FARK YEAH!

We need an education overhaul.
 
2017-12-31 06:19:17 PM  

Silverstaff: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.


Even in schools that aren't in Texas, history teachings tend to omit any part of history where the USA wasn't AWESOME! You get a little bit of native american displacement and resettlement but that is about it.
 
2017-12-31 06:22:36 PM  

swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.


It's NOT a common subject in the US. . .I had only heard about it in passing in college, and I'd never heard of it outside an academic environment until my mother made me sit through the movie Atonement a decade ago. . .and I was around 30 at the time.

It's definitely NOT a common subject in US media.  US media coverage of World War II focuses more on D-Day and the western front of the land war after that, or on Hitler's rise to power, or on the development and use of the atomic bomb, or on the attack on Pearl Harbor as the key events, with the naval campaign in the Pacific and the Battle of Britain and maybe the north Africa campaign against Rommel also covered to a lesser extent, definitely not Dunkirk, that's treated as a very obscure historical trivia piece.
 
2017-12-31 06:27:03 PM  

TheManofPA: moothemagiccow: Tourney3p0: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

"haha, I bet this will be garbage.  I'm going to give them money.  I'm not at all garbage myself".

I saw like 3 Pauly Shore movies in the theater as a kid
Both Deuce Bigolo movies
I'm going to see Tyler Perry presents St Madea-trick's Day on opening night just to piss you off

Now you got me thinking
A) How has Tyler not made that movie, it'll make 60 mill on a 20 mill budget
B) What are great St Pattys movies? My goto is Boondock Saints


Make it a triple feature with the Barrytown Trilogy (The Commitments, The Snapper, The Van)
 
2017-12-31 06:28:24 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: Silverstaff: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.

Even in schools that aren't in Texas, history teachings tend to omit any part of history where the USA wasn't AWESOME! You get a little bit of native american displacement and resettlement but that is about it.


Slavery is covered a fair bit. And I did go to school in Texas. But my high school US history teacher was black, which might have explained her not being a derpster about the causes of the war. Graduated in 1996.
 
2017-12-31 06:35:12 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: Silverstaff: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.

Even in schools that aren't in Texas, history teachings tend to omit any part of history where the USA wasn't AWESOME! You get a little bit of native american displacement and resettlement but that is about it.


Yup. History in the US is a strange chimera beastie. It's taught at almost all levels of education, but in a way that 'people' think kids can handle it. Example: in the early years, Kindergarten & 1st grade, you're taught basics of US history: George Washington, a simplified Revolution, Constitution, westward expansion. As you advance through the school system, you start learning the uglier stuff (slavery, Native genocide, Jim Crow) piecemeal at ages that are deemed 'appropriate'. Like, we never really got into the Native Genocide until Junior High (Grades 7 & 8; ages 12 & 13). So, you have to unlearn certain things and face the ugly truths later. Which explains the world-view of Americans that leave school early to certain historic issues; they're never exposed to the negative and only exposed to the good. Even then, stuff is still glossed over and left for College Courses; I don't think we ever got too deep into Jim Crow, for example, even in High School; it was more 'post-Civil War South passed laws limiting the ability of blacks to vote, it sucked badly for about 100 years, then in the 1950's and 60's there was the Civil Rights movement and that's what we're going to examine. But only MLK, because that Malcolm X fellow and the Black Panthers were dangerous radicals'.
 
2017-12-31 06:38:51 PM  

RoyFokker'sGhost: antidisestablishmentarianism: Silverstaff: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.

Even in schools that aren't in Texas, history teachings tend to omit any part of history where the USA wasn't AWESOME! You get a little bit of native american displacement and resettlement but that is about it.

Yup. History in the US is a strange chimera beastie. It's taught at almost all levels of education, but in a way that 'people' think kids can handle it. Example: in the early years, Kindergarten & 1st grade, you're taught basics of US history: George Washington, a simplified Revolution, Constitution, westward expansion. As you advance through the school system, you start learning the uglier stuff (slavery, Native genocide, Jim Crow) piecemeal at ages that are deemed 'appropriate'. Like, we never really got into the Native Genocide until Junior High (Grades 7 & 8; ages 12 & 13). So, you have to unlearn certain things and face the ugly truths later. Which explains the world-view of Americans that leave school early to certain historic issues; they're never exposed to the negative and only exposed to the good. Even then, stuff is still glossed over and left for College Courses; I don't think we ever got too deep into Jim Crow, for example, even in High School; it was more 'post-Civil War South passed laws limiting the ability of blacks to vote, it sucked badly for about 100 years, then in the 1950's and 60's there was the Civil Rights movement and that's what we're going to examine. But only MLK, because that Malcolm X fellow and the Black Panthers were dangerous radicals'.


That is sadly accurate.
 
2017-12-31 06:39:14 PM  

davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.


too depressing.  I get enough of that without going to the theater.
 
2017-12-31 06:42:36 PM  

Silverstaff: czetie: davidphogan: I finally watched Dunkirk last night and really enjoyed it. It was one of the best war movies I've seen in a long time, but oddly I heard very little about it after it was released.

Are the events of Dunkirk well-known in the US? I grew up in England and even then the term "Dunkirk spirit" was still in common use.

No, that's not a particularly well known event in the US.

The common narrative in US media and public schools about World War II is that the Nazis attacked Poland and then quickly conquered most of Europe (except Italy, which was on their side), and the French famously set up their collaborator government. . .then the war was mostly an air war with Germany bombing the UK. . .then the US got involved, built up a huge force in the UK, invaded via Normandy, then retook Europe from the west while the Soviets fought from the East, meeting in Berlin.

Dunkirk. . .or the idea that there really was any significant fighting on the western front of Europe before D-Day is NOT commonly covered in US media nor public schools. . .I didn't even hear about it until late in college.


I was taught that the US of A entered the WWII when the Germans bombed Coral Harbour. Then the Australians threw in with the Germans and toppled Italy. But ultimately, the Illuminati set the whole thing up so Obama got elected in 2008 and ushered in the 1000 years of darkness that the great Karate expert Chuck Norris proclaimed. Those 1000 years of darkness started AFTER Obama's illegitimate reign though,, which was kicked off with the election of one Donald J. Trump.

/study it out
//fark your third slash
 
2017-12-31 06:49:28 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: ltnor: Sin_City_Superhero: I liked Baywatch.  It was exactly as ridiculous as I expected it to be.

I went in with zero expectations and was completely entertained by the ridiculousness of it.

I watched it on a trans atlantic flight (love you Delta!). After I figured out what they were going for I enjoyed the movie.


I watched it as an I flight move too.  It was so bad I walked out after 10 minutes.
 
2017-12-31 06:51:03 PM  

Scyllz: swahnhennessy: I don't know how a person gets to 20 without having at least a passing familiarity of every major WWII action, Dunkirk included. It's not like history on the subject is rare or you need to have an interest in war. It's such a common subject across media that you can pick it up by accidemt.

It's sad, but American history classes in general don't explain the hows and whys, just give you the barest "facts" and everything else you learn is YO JOE AMERICA FARK YEAH!

We need an education overhaul.


I get why history is taught the way it is, mostly because most people don't retain much of it, but as someone who loves history it sucked for me.

Yeah, we cover what year things happened, but until college (and mostly after from my own curiosity) it was rare to have things interconnected in a way that it all really came together.

The Civil War is a great example, where I understood a lot of the details from family vacations to the South and around the Eastern US, but until I moved to Oregon I never understood a lot of the details about how and why the west coast was on the side of the Union or how Western Expansion influenced the outcome of the war.

WW2 is another great example. The Pacific and European wars were covered at different times in different grades, and Africa wasn't really covered until I was in college.

We could do better for the students who care, but I was in the gifted and talented classes in school and even then it was over the head of lots of kids in my classes.

Don't even get me started on science. It took Kerbal Space Program for me to feel like I kind of understand lots of the nuances of why NASA is so freaking awesome, and that was in my 30s as someone who's been a nerd my whole life.
 
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