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(The Conversation)   There are several things thin people do not understand about dieting   ( theconversation.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Nicky, Nutrition, dieters, unfair fight, weight loss, food, Obesity, weight loss goal  
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688 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 30 Dec 2017 at 9:48 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-12-30 07:33:06 PM  
If you eat less you will lose weight. How hard is that to understand?
 
2017-12-30 08:17:47 PM  
Was the obvious tag in the bathroom purging?
 
2017-12-30 09:01:15 PM  
Yes there are multiple reasons, but the most important reason? They don't understand drinking is awesome.
 
2017-12-30 09:38:16 PM  
Fat is not your enemy.

It's sugar.
 
2017-12-30 09:38:35 PM  
"She is Naturally Thin Nicky "

Ah yes, the ol' "you have it easy you don't have to do anything to stay thin" trope.

It's not that I eat reasonable amounts of food.
Or that I exercise.
Or that I limit the amount of alcohol I drink.
And when I "diet" to lose my beer gut and succeed it's because I must have a fast metabolism so it's really no effort for me at all.

You're right, I don't understand at all.Too complicated for me.
 
2017-12-30 09:54:53 PM  
Remember folks, the weight loss you experience from killing or severely beating thin people is only temporary.
 
2017-12-30 10:01:51 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-30 10:11:28 PM  
I had no problem staying thin until I hit about 40. Now I have to watch what I eat.
Sugar is the worst. I can get off it and my cravings go away after a week or two, then one of my kids goes to a birthday party or the in-laws show up with donuts and I'm back to the cravings. I hate that apparently it's impossible to ban that shiat from my house.
 
2017-12-30 10:29:33 PM  
What a stupid article.
 
2017-12-30 10:35:09 PM  

wax_on: I had no problem staying thin until I hit about 40. Now I have to watch what I eat.
Sugar is the worst. I can get off it and my cravings go away after a week or two, then one of my kids goes to a birthday party or the in-laws show up with donuts and I'm back to the cravings. I hate that apparently it's impossible to ban that shiat from my house.


Hell man, it's worse than that. That shiat is in your blood.
 
2017-12-30 10:59:26 PM  
Beer is what does me in. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
 
2017-12-30 11:13:52 PM  

toejam: Beer is what does me in. The cause of and solution to all of life's problems.


Mrs. TYBJ! : "Sweetie, you're allergic to beer."
TYBJ!: *blink*. I like beer.
Mrs. TYBJ!: "You're allergic to it. The puffy eyes, stuffy nose, that's from the beer."
TYBJ!: mmm... beer...
 
2017-12-30 11:28:10 PM  
"Diets do not work"

*stoppedreadingrightthere*

I've lost and kept off over 130 pounds by walking and eating minimal garbage and a moderated (not hellish strict) diet. Losing weight is like gaining weight in that it doesn't happen overnight. It takes time and effort to gain 50 pounds. Effort to get the garbage food to your face and a period of time doing nothing while it stacks up as fat. I spent as much time planning to eat terrible food and obtaining it as I did planning good meals and prepping. It was just more enjoyable to think about lunch at dinner and dinner at lunch than to think about grilled chicken breasts again. It takes as much time and effort and planning to get fat as it does thin. More people get fat than thin because it's a more enjoyable effort.

"OMG how much time do you spend on Sunday grilling chicken and cutting vegetables????"
Probably less than you spend in drive thrus and ordering at Olive Garden or other subpar restaurants each week.


Diets do work. Fark this author.
 
2017-12-30 11:53:25 PM  
I lost a bunch of weight almost 20 years ago by cutting a lot of crap out of my diet. I'm not skinny, but I still don't weigh as much as I did 20 years ago. If it was just genetics that wouldn't be possible.

The author is full of crap.
 
2017-12-30 11:58:34 PM  
sorry no
2/3 of the US population are not genetically predisposed to be fat
 
2017-12-31 12:11:35 AM  

spooky.action: Yes there are multiple reasons, but the most important reason? They don't understand drinking is awesome.


I'm thin and out drink much larger people.
/Does a six pack of beer and a few fries count as a meal?
 
2017-12-31 12:16:11 AM  
This is a frustrating topic for me. I was born hungry. I was fed solid food before I left the hospital. To date, my stomach growls all the time.

In my teens I started leaning towards a healthy diet - more veggies & fruits less sugar.I don't like sweets or soda so they're not consumed much. But weight has always been a problem for me.

In my teens I walked a lot because I didn't have a car. In my 20 - 30's I did the same. Had a physical job. Got a GSD and walked her a couple miles twice a day. Took the stairs instead of the elevator (it's usually faster), dropped my wife off at the storefront & parked in the back lot met her in the store then went & got the car for her. Still had trouble with my weight.

In my 40's I walked to & from work. It was a little more then a mile one way.  My disability's started then. The meds I was put on started piling on weight. Cut my diet back to a meal a day but I was fighting against the Dr's who insisted I was eating more when the side effects listed weight gain. They just don't wanna hear that you can't keep putting weight on a body that can't move and expect me to lose it.

Now I'm in my late 50's and the weight is a big issue. I was hospitalized for DKA. My bg was over 500 or didn't register on my meter. I lost 40 lbs and was able to use my walker again. I told my Endo Dr I was concerned about weight gain when he put me on insulin. That fell on deaf ears. I dropped my A1C 3.9 points in 3 months and gained the 40 lbs back. I told my PCP during that time it was the insulin causing this. "Nope, it's your diet". Yet everything I've read about being T2 and starting insulin says to not drop your A1C too quickly because you'll gain weight. BTW - I've cut the insulin down about 50% and my bg is in a normal range. I'd be in a coma 2 months ago if I kept following their Rx.

But man ask them for something to help burn the weight off so you can move more & do it yourself and you're labeled a drug seeker.

/new year - new Dr's
//we'll see how that goes
///I sound fat
 
2017-12-31 12:16:24 AM  

rudemix: "Diets do not work"

*stoppedreadingrightthere*

I've lost and kept off over 130 pounds by walking and eating minimal garbage and a moderated (not hellish strict) diet. Losing weight is like gaining weight in that it doesn't happen overnight. It takes time and effort to gain 50 pounds. Effort to get the garbage food to your face and a period of time doing nothing while it stacks up as fat. I spent as much time planning to eat terrible food and obtaining it as I did planning good meals and prepping. It was just more enjoyable to think about lunch at dinner and dinner at lunch than to think about grilled chicken breasts again. It takes as much time and effort and planning to get fat as it does thin. More people get fat than thin because it's a more enjoyable effort.

"OMG how much time do you spend on Sunday grilling chicken and cutting vegetables????"
Probably less than you spend in drive thrus and ordering at Olive Garden or other subpar restaurants each week.


Diets do work. Fark this author.


I mean, the idea that "diets don't work" is true in the sense that if you let yourself get fat, the odds are stacked against you ever getting skinny again. The body wants to get back to "normal," willpower is a limited resource, etc. But, that's true of alcohol dependence, too.

It would be absurd to tell somebody, "Ackshully, not drinking won't keep you from being a drunk, so don't bother." Statistically true over time, but causally nonsense. And it'd be terrifically stupid advice to give to someone with a drinking problem.

/got fat in my 20s, and dropped that shiat like a hot potato
//the drinking is another issue
 
2017-12-31 12:51:17 AM  
Traci Mann: 'Eating Lab: The Science of Weight Loss' | Talks at Google
Youtube o-vMrrZA3cM


Traci Mann grew up in Highland Park, Illinois, and went to college at the University of Virginia, where she thought she would become a mathematician or engineer. She abandoned those plans after taking her first psychology course, and went on to attain her Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1995. She was a professor at UCLA for nine years before moving to the University of Minnesota and founding the Health and Eating Lab. Her research has been funded by the NIH, the USDA, and NASA, and is published in dozens of scholarly journals. She has received teaching awards at Stanford, UCLA, and the University of Minnesota, is the president of the Social Personality and Health (SPH) Network, and is an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, The Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and the American Psychological Association.

what a quack...
 
2017-12-31 12:59:19 AM  
Diets do not work.

No sh*t.

Lifestyles work. If your diet has a name, it sucks and you will fail. If it requires you pay people to tell you how to eat and to maybe get off your ass once in a while, it sucks and you will fail.

Go through your fridge, pantry and that stash in your desk drawer. Throw all that garbage out. Buy some lean meat, fruits and veggies. Get used to that. Then get up and move around a bit. Nothing drastic to start, if you live on the sixth floor only take the elevator up to the fifth. Walk a flight. Do it every time. You might start to notice a difference.

/ or get used to a mobility scooter and insulin
 
2017-12-31 01:16:46 AM  
One of the things the article gets right is the way your brain reprograms baseline.

Kids who grow up eating shiatty food throw off their baseline and then crave ever shiattier food.  Salty taste is based on a sodium gradient in your taste receptors.  If you have really high blood sodium levels, then it takes more salt for food to taste salty.  This causes people to continue adding more salt starting a vicious cycle.  Similarly, in the US we have grown up with so much sugar in our foods that we can't even taste it in a lot of places.  Our sandwich bread is practically dessert to people who grew up without sugar added to everything.

If you really want to lose weight (and save a lot of money) start drinking water instead of juice/soda.  Diet drinks just scratch the sweet itch, which then sets you up to crave more sweet.
 
2017-12-31 01:20:26 AM  
I'm not sure if I'm lucky or unlucky. I was always a big kid, and I'm a big guy. Not strictly "fat", but just built tall and sturdy. So, that plus kinda fat. I was a little fat in high school, continued to graduate college a little fat, and am still a little fat all these years later. Meanwhile, I've seen people who were skinny little poles at college graduation balloon up to way bigger than me. So either I'm doing something jussssst right and wrong enough to be in stasis all these decades, or my genetics said "hey we're gonna screw this guy over in lots of other ways, let's just make him a little fat instead of Walmart fat." Heck if I know what it is, but apparently it's possible to eat pizza and drink and just stay sort of fat.
 
2017-12-31 01:43:09 AM  

rudemix: "Diets do not work"

*stoppedreadingrightthere*

I've lost and kept off over 130 pounds by walking and eating minimal garbage and a moderated (not hellish strict) diet. Losing weight is like gaining weight in that it doesn't happen overnight. It takes time and effort to gain 50 pounds. Effort to get the garbage food to your face and a period of time doing nothing while it stacks up as fat. I spent as much time planning to eat terrible food and obtaining it as I did planning good meals and prepping. It was just more enjoyable to think about lunch at dinner and dinner at lunch than to think about grilled chicken breasts again. It takes as much time and effort and planning to get fat as it does thin. More people get fat than thin because it's a more enjoyable effort.

"OMG how much time do you spend on Sunday grilling chicken and cutting vegetables????"
Probably less than you spend in drive thrus and ordering at Olive Garden or other subpar restaurants each week.


Diets do work. Fark this author.


I'm gonna bookmark right here to check for all the fatty excuses for why this isn't so.
 
2017-12-31 01:50:13 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-31 01:58:35 AM  

GregoryD: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/o-vMrrZA​3cM]

Traci Mann grew up in Highland Park, Illinois, and went to college at the University of Virginia, where she thought she would become a mathematician or engineer. She abandoned those plans after taking her first psychology course, and went on to attain her Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1995. She was a professor at UCLA for nine years before moving to the University of Minnesota and founding the Health and Eating Lab. Her research has been funded by the NIH, the USDA, and NASA, and is published in dozens of scholarly journals. She has received teaching awards at Stanford, UCLA, and the University of Minnesota, is the president of the Social Personality and Health (SPH) Network, and is an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, The Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and the American Psychological Association.

what a quack...


There is another professor in the same field, from a different university that agrees with her. She's in the comments at the bottom
 
2017-12-31 02:02:52 AM  
I've always been scrawny.  I have to *try* to put on some pounds for winter, so I'm not cold all the damn time.
 
2017-12-31 02:37:00 AM  

rudemix: "Diets do not work"

*stoppedreadingrightthere*

I've lost and kept off over 130 pounds by walking and eating minimal garbage and a moderated (not hellish strict) diet. Losing weight is like gaining weight in that it doesn't happen overnight. It takes time and effort to gain 50 pounds. Effort to get the garbage food to your face and a period of time doing nothing while it stacks up as fat. I spent as much time planning to eat terrible food and obtaining it as I did planning good meals and prepping. It was just more enjoyable to think about lunch at dinner and dinner at lunch than to think about grilled chicken breasts again. It takes as much time and effort and planning to get fat as it does thin. More people get fat than thin because it's a more enjoyable effort.

"OMG how much time do you spend on Sunday grilling chicken and cutting vegetables????"
Probably less than you spend in drive thrus and ordering at Olive Garden or other subpar restaurants each week.


Diets do work. Fark this author.


I guess the question is: did you change your diet once you lost the weight, or have your eating habits changed now?

If your eating habits have changed, and your exercise habits as well, then that's not "a diet" but a change in behavior and activity. If you went back to your old habits, then the previous changes were a diet, and you can pretty well expect to gain that back.

The point is that changes in diet in the short term can indeed work, for a short while, but the only way to KEEP it off is to make long term changes.
 
2017-12-31 02:50:16 AM  
webprancer.comView Full Size


Disclaimer: I've never been on one.
 
2017-12-31 03:04:31 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: GregoryD: [Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/o-vMrrZA​3cM]

Traci Mann grew up in Highland Park, Illinois, and went to college at the University of Virginia, where she thought she would become a mathematician or engineer. She abandoned those plans after taking her first psychology course, and went on to attain her Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1995. She was a professor at UCLA for nine years before moving to the University of Minnesota and founding the Health and Eating Lab. Her research has been funded by the NIH, the USDA, and NASA, and is published in dozens of scholarly journals. She has received teaching awards at Stanford, UCLA, and the University of Minnesota, is the president of the Social Personality and Health (SPH) Network, and is an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, The Society for Experimental Social Psychology, and the American Psychological Association.

what a quack...

There is another professor in the same field, from a different university that agrees with her. She's in the comments at the bottom


What has the eggheads from Stanford ever told us? Grants from the NIH, NASA, USDA she clearly operates on the fringe of science, unlike all the scholars in this thread.
 
2017-12-31 03:27:26 AM  
So, the most I ever weighed was 130 pounds. I gained 12 pounds in about three and a half months. I really, really liked New Orleans food. Then I got on a scale. Oh, HELL, no.  I had to buy adult sized pants (in fact I had to replace ALL my pants). I nearly bust out of my tailored clothes. I went from a 32 band bra to a 34.

Did I exercise, you ask? Nope. I was working 6 twelves, averaging at least ten miles a shift walking, and tended to pass out after work. So I changed my diet.I dropped 90% of all produced foods. I almost entirely dropped bread (unless I made it). I almost entirely dropped beef. I started eating a lot of fish, and chicken, and sweet potato.

It took a little bit, because those relatively small adjustments can, especially by diet control only, but I dropped to 120 pounds. I maintained that, with little to no deviation, for years. Now that I've started beach body I'm at between 115 and 118 depending on time of day. I shift a bit, week to week.

And let's be clear: I REALLY like Reeses PB cups. I REALLY like ice cream. I just buy Ben and Jerry's so it's so rich I barely eat any of it. I buy bags of single PB cups and toss them in the freezer so I can grab two and be done with the sugar craving. Really, I eat whatever the hell I want, just most of it's in very small portions, and my main meal is lunch, and always home made.

"Naturally" thin? No. This is control. When I hear people say "dieting doesn't work" I hear "I have no self control", or, sometimes "I did no research and crash dieted and now my metabolism is gone."

/had to learn to actually eat dinner once I started exercising
//why am I hungry what
/oh wait
 
2017-12-31 03:32:48 AM  

fusillade762: If you eat less you will lose weight. How hard is that to understand?


Mate I have kinda known you for some time now but oversimplifying something like this makes you look dumb. And i say that because of a person close to me who had a doc tell her that while she was consuming under 1500 calories a day. But weight gain was her fault.Not his misdiagnosis and other factors. ...
 
2017-12-31 08:50:55 AM  

alienated: fusillade762: If you eat less you will lose weight. How hard is that to understand?

Mate I have kinda known you for some time now but oversimplifying something like this makes you look dumb. And i say that because of a person close to me who had a doc tell her that while she was consuming under 1500 calories a day. But weight gain was her fault.Not his misdiagnosis and other factors. ...


The 2000-2500 calorie per day guideline is just an average, meant for people in good health who stay physically active. At 1500, if the person leads a sedentary lifestyle and depending on age as well as other factors, they can easily gain weight, or at least not lose any.

I've experienced this myself. I have to average 1400 calories per day to maintain my current weight. To lose weight, I have to either lower that amount, or get regular exercise.
 
2017-12-31 09:11:19 AM  

Victor's Ghost: This is a frustrating topic for me. I was born hungry. I was fed solid food before I left the hospital. To date, my stomach growls all the time.

In my teens I started leaning towards a healthy diet - more veggies & fruits less sugar.I don't like sweets or soda so they're not consumed much. But weight has always been a problem for me.

In my teens I walked a lot because I didn't have a car. In my 20 - 30's I did the same. Had a physical job. Got a GSD and walked her a couple miles twice a day. Took the stairs instead of the elevator (it's usually faster), dropped my wife off at the storefront & parked in the back lot met her in the store then went & got the car for her. Still had trouble with my weight.

In my 40's I walked to & from work. It was a little more then a mile one way.  My disability's started then. The meds I was put on started piling on weight. Cut my diet back to a meal a day but I was fighting against the Dr's who insisted I was eating more when the side effects listed weight gain. They just don't wanna hear that you can't keep putting weight on a body that can't move and expect me to lose it.

Now I'm in my late 50's and the weight is a big issue. I was hospitalized for DKA. My bg was over 500 or didn't register on my meter. I lost 40 lbs and was able to use my walker again. I told my Endo Dr I was concerned about weight gain when he put me on insulin. That fell on deaf ears. I dropped my A1C 3.9 points in 3 months and gained the 40 lbs back. I told my PCP during that time it was the insulin causing this. "Nope, it's your diet". Yet everything I've read about being T2 and starting insulin says to not drop your A1C too quickly because you'll gain weight. BTW - I've cut the insulin down about 50% and my bg is in a normal range. I'd be in a coma 2 months ago if I kept following their Rx.

But man ask them for something to help burn the weight off so you can move more & do it yourself and you're labeled a drug seeker.

/new year - new Dr's
//we'll see how that goes
///I sound fat


Keto.
Keto.
Keto.
 
2017-12-31 09:33:30 AM  

Victor's Ghost: The meds I was put on started piling on weight. Cut my diet back to a meal a day but I was fighting against the Dr's who insisted I was eating more when the side effects listed weight gain.


Weight gain as a side effect just means increased appetite.  Meds don't make calories magically appear if you're not eating.
 
2017-12-31 10:05:11 AM  
Many heavy people wouldn't be lean like Nicky even if they ate the same foods in the same quantities. Their bodies are able to run on fewer calories than Nicky's, which sounds like a good thing (and would be great if you found yourself in a famine).
However, it actually means that after eating the same foods and using that energy to run the systems of their body, they have more calories left over to store as fat than Nicky does. So to actually lose weight, they have to eat less food than Nicky. And then, once they've been dieting a while, their metabolism changes so that they need to eat even less than that to keep losing weight
.

I don't usually do this, but...
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size

This crap was debunked years ago. The heavier you are, the faster your body has to burn energy just to keep you going.
 
2017-12-31 11:25:26 AM  
I'm a male "Nicky", able to eat whatever I choose without weight concerns. It would be nice to be able to retain some of what I eat, but I am not going to complain too much. I've looked into some alternative theories on this, and besides the generic genetic category, there's a belief that some of our recessed facial features put pressure on cranial growth hormone glands. Everyone always mentions how Asians are never fat, but with their facial structure, most of them might have trouble being overweight. Those are theories only, and I don't know that anyone is researching them further.
 
2017-12-31 11:34:51 AM  

BMFPitt: Victor's Ghost: The meds I was put on started piling on weight. Cut my diet back to a meal a day but I was fighting against the Dr's who insisted I was eating more when the side effects listed weight gain.

Weight gain as a side effect just means increased appetite.  Meds don't make calories magically appear if you're not eating.


i beg to differ:  https://www.diabetesselfmana​gement.com​/blog/gaining-weight-medication-may-bl​ame/

The link between medication and weight
If you have diabetes, chances are, you're taking some form of medication. It might be medication to help you manage your blood sugars. You might also be taking medication to keep your blood pressure or your cholesterol numbers in check. And you might even be taking a medication to help you better cope with the stress of having a chronic condition. While all of these drugs are effective (or else why would you be taking them?), the reality is that, like all medications, some of them have side effects that can make it difficult to reach your weight goal or can even lead to weight gain. To be more specific, these meds might:
• Jump-start your appetite, causing you to eat more than you usually might
• Slow your metabolism so that you burn fewer calories
• Affect how glucose is stored in the body, leading to increased fat storage
• Cause fluid retention

• Make you feel tired or sluggish, which can prevent you from being as active as you might like

Insulin: Insulin is probably the most effective medicine there is to help you manage your blood sugars. The primary side effect of insulin is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), but some people find that when they start on insulin, they gain some weight. There are two reasons for this. First, insulin is called an anabolic hormone, which means that it promotes the storage of excess glucose, fat, and protein. So any calories that you don't burn off get stored as fat. Second, as I mentioned, hypoglycemia is a possible side effect, and having frequent low sugars can quickly lead to weight gain because to treat the low, you need to eat or drink something that contains carbohydrate. Juice, glucose tabs, candy - all of these contain calories.
Corticosteroids: Also known as steroid hormones, these powerful drugs are prescribed for many conditions. They have an anti-inflammatory effect, making them suitable for treating conditions such as asthma, arthritis, lupus, vasculitis, and inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease). Prednisone and hydrocortisone are examples of corticosteroids. If you take these drugs short-term, weight gain may not be an issue. But many people need to take them for long periods of time, which can increase the chances of gaining weight. Corticosteroids cause weight gain by affecting metabolism and increasing appetite. In addition, these drugs can cause a redistribution of fat in the body, leading to extra fat in the abdomen, face, and back of the neck. Excess weight is usually lost once the drug is stopped.


Like I said above - I'm hungry all the time but I don't eat constantly to stop my stomach from growling. I watch my intake. I've also lost weight "magically" before when I've stopped taking some meds.
 
2017-12-31 11:53:59 AM  
Weight is such a touchy subject to deal with. I'm a "Nicky", I have a crazy high metabolism, but it isn't all it's cracked up to be. I am constantly eating. I can't go more than 2 hours (awake), without eating something. If I skip a meal or snack, I start shaking and getting light-headed. I always keep granola bars and Gatorade in my purse, poptarts in my car, and a bag of chocolate in the fridge. And yes, I've been tested for that, and that, and that, medically I am perfectly healthy. I hover at a size 4, and I've been that way for as long as I can remember. I'm on the low side of my 30's, and I just hope that my metabolism slows down closer to my 40's.
 
2017-12-31 12:02:25 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Fat is not your enemy.

It's sugar.


Fat isn't sugar dumbass.
 
2017-12-31 12:09:03 PM  

This text is now purple: wax_on: I had no problem staying thin until I hit about 40. Now I have to watch what I eat.
Sugar is the worst. I can get off it and my cravings go away after a week or two, then one of my kids goes to a birthday party or the in-laws show up with donuts and I'm back to the cravings. I hate that apparently it's impossible to ban that shiat from my house.

Hell man, it's worse than that. That shiat is in your blood.


I've heard of blood in shiat but not shiat in blood. Sounds serious.
 
2017-12-31 12:17:08 PM  

misterrperrfect: Victor's Ghost: This is a frustrating topic for me. I was born hungry. I was fed solid food
Keto Keto Keto


This is the same issue with "diets don't work".  Keto might be fine in taking you down to your target weight but it is going to kill your kidneys if you try to make it your "lifestyle change".  And unless you do a "lifestyle change" you are going to go back to your old weight, only with more fat and less muscle (and with a nasty ratchet effect that only makes things worse).

Note to "I ate Shergar", the above ratchet effect is likely real, and people tend to move less as they get fatter/older.  In *general* the heavier you are the more you will burn, but don't expect to notice it personally after a few trips on the yo-yo.
 
2017-12-31 12:35:24 PM  
I think authors of articles like this need to point out that even though genetics play a huge role, stuff like dropping soda and increasing activity DO work for most people. I really hope no one reads this and uses it as an excuse to give up.

I personally believe that people's health is mostly determined by childhood, though. Your body makes fat cells right before/after birth and at puberty. The rest of the time fat cells just increase and decrease in size, so could your family afford lean meats and fresh vegetables?  Were you given water or taught all drinks are supposed to taste sweet?  Did your family eat homemade meals at the table or just snack in front of the t.v?  At the very least, do what you can to break the cycle.

/Really tired of people shoving candy at kids at school and stores all the freaking time. It's almost impossible to go out in public without this happening.  What's wrong with candy being an occasional treat, and why can't you ask me if it's okay instead of asking my kid?
 
2017-12-31 01:09:56 PM  
Weigh yourself every day and log it. 20 pounds can't sneak up on you half a pound at a time that way. And knocking off even a pound or two per month will eventually get you to the right place.
 
2017-12-31 03:31:36 PM  

Occam's Disposable Razor: Weigh yourself every day and log it. 20 pounds can't sneak up on you half a pound at a time that way. And knocking off even a pound or two per month will eventually get you to the right place.


You should never weigh yourself more than once per week. Your weight can fluctuate a pound or more, both up and down, from day to day for reasons that have nothing to do with actual weight loss or gain. (ie, water weight, slow digesting food that hasn't made it through your system yet, ect.)

The best advice is to do it once per week, at the same day and time. Best before you have your first meal that day.
 
2017-12-31 03:36:36 PM  

Russ1642: ecmoRandomNumbers: Fat is not your enemy.

It's sugar.

Fat isn't sugar dumbass.


I think he knew that.
 
2017-12-31 03:43:54 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Occam's Disposable Razor: Weigh yourself every day and log it. 20 pounds can't sneak up on you half a pound at a time that way. And knocking off even a pound or two per month will eventually get you to the right place.

You should never weigh yourself more than once per week. Your weight can fluctuate a pound or more, both up and down, from day to day for reasons that have nothing to do with actual weight loss or gain. (ie, water weight, slow digesting food that hasn't made it through your system yet, ect.)

The best advice is to do it once per week, at the same day and time. Best before you have your first meal that day.


If a single reading can fluctuate by more than a pound, then wouldn't you want more data points so that the obvious outliers can be tossed?
 
2017-12-31 06:00:02 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Occam's Disposable Razor: Weigh yourself every day and log it. 20 pounds can't sneak up on you half a pound at a time that way. And knocking off even a pound or two per month will eventually get you to the right place.

You should never weigh yourself more than once per week. Your weight can fluctuate a pound or more, both up and down, from day to day for reasons that have nothing to do with actual weight loss or gain. (ie, water weight, slow digesting food that hasn't made it through your system yet, ect.)

The best advice is to do it once per week, at the same day and time. Best before you have your first meal that day.


Oh I've seen it fluctuate by 3-4 pounds in 24 hours which I know doesn't mean much. But you can keep a moving average and get useful data over time. I agree that weekly trends are better, but it's easier to remember when you do it every day. It's also easier to make up for 5 days of steady weight gain rather than two weeks.

For example, I see that it's up by a pound or two for a few straight days. Better do something. See I'm up by a pound after one week? Could be normal variance. Wait another week, and now it's 3 pounds. Uh oh
 
2017-12-31 08:40:01 PM  

Russ1642: ecmoRandomNumbers: Fat is not your enemy.

It's sugar.

Fat isn't sugar dumbass.


Read up on what your liver does with sugar when your muscles and liver can't store any more glycogen, and come back.

Dumbass.
 
2018-01-01 04:02:45 AM  

ReapTheChaos: alienated: fusillade762: If you eat less you will lose weight. How hard is that to understand?

Mate I have kinda known you for some time now but oversimplifying something like this makes you look dumb. And i say that because of a person close to me who had a doc tell her that while she was consuming under 1500 calories a day. But weight gain was her fault.Not his misdiagnosis and other factors. ...

The 2000-2500 calorie per day guideline is just an average, meant for people in good health who stay physically active. At 1500, if the person leads a sedentary lifestyle and depending on age as well as other factors, they can easily gain weight, or at least not lose any.

I've experienced this myself. I have to average 1400 calories per day to maintain my current weight. To lose weight, I have to either lower that amount, or get regular exercise.


A lot of this.  I sit at a desk all day, then drive home.  I can maintain my weight with 1600 calories or so.  To lose weight at a noticable pace, I need need like 1200 or so.

I'm a guy, 5'9", most people tell me I should eat 2000 or more calories.  Even some online calculators place me over 2000 to maintain.
 
2018-01-01 04:07:08 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Occam's Disposable Razor: Weigh yourself every day and log it. 20 pounds can't sneak up on you half a pound at a time that way. And knocking off even a pound or two per month will eventually get you to the right place.

You should never weigh yourself more than once per week. Your weight can fluctuate a pound or more, both up and down, from day to day for reasons that have nothing to do with actual weight loss or gain. (ie, water weight, slow digesting food that hasn't made it through your system yet, ect.)

The best advice is to do it once per week, at the same day and time. Best before you have your first meal that day.


Maybe this is a personal thing, or a sex thing, but I always weigh myself daily when dieting, and it's always crazy stable.

If you are eating and drinking very similar amounts, at least for me, it really doesn't fluctuate.  Off my diet, sure.  A big dinner and then next morning I'm up two pounds, or and afternoon hiking and I'm down four.... But when I'm following a diet and exercise routine, the daily weigh in really helps me stay focused.
 
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