Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(PR Newswire)   18,000 hot dogs, 65,000 beers, and 1,000 volunteers: What it takes to feed more than 90,000 fans at Rose Bowl Stadium on January 1   ( prnewswire.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Pasadena, California, Rose Bowl Stadium, Rose Bowl Game, Rose Bowl, BCS National Championship Game, Rose Bowl dishes, SodexoMAGIC General Manager, locally-made salsa toppings  
•       •       •

283 clicks; posted to Sports » on 28 Dec 2017 at 3:20 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-12-28 12:33:56 PM  
So...like a REAL bowl game?
 
2017-12-28 12:35:27 PM  
Will the 1,000 volunteers be marinated in teriyaki?
 
2017-12-28 01:24:59 PM  
Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.
 
2017-12-28 01:42:22 PM  

martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.


True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.
 
2017-12-28 01:51:31 PM  
Why would you volunteer for that? The CEO is making high six figures easily. Let him do some ushering.
 
2017-12-28 01:53:27 PM  
They're only expecting (roughly) 1 out of 6 people to eat a hot dog?  The beer might be about right as a cold beer on Jan 1st... eh (although it is in sunny Calif. so ymmv).

And the per person projections are all based upon those people only wanting one of each & not the fat guy next to you wanting four dogs & three beers.
 
2017-12-28 02:27:59 PM  

Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.


College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL
 
2017-12-28 03:26:13 PM  

martissimo: Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.

College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL


Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.

During the 1994 Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. UCLA, the stadium ran out of beer.  65,000 beers for 100,000 fans?  That's laughably low.
 
2017-12-28 03:28:35 PM  

Lorenzo Von Matterhorn: martissimo: Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.

College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL

Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.

During the 1994 Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. UCLA, the stadium ran out of beer.  65,000 beers for 100,000 fans?  That's laughably low.


Obviously they didn't take into account Wisconsin.
 
2017-12-28 03:28:38 PM  
i saw U2 there back in May.  Pretty awesome just to be at the venue.  i thought before we went in, 'man, it seems much shorter than I expected...."  turns out the field is a good, i don't know, 30-40' below the surface level. outside looking in it looks small and squat. inside looking out you see the 'height', so to speak, of the stadium.

they had laid a protective plastic floor system over the grass so we weren't on the field per se.  but, I was standing at right about the 50yd line;  looking to eitehr my left or right was midpoint of the scoreboard / stands.  kinda cool moment.  and then of course U2 comes out and melts my farking face for 2 hours...
 
2017-12-28 03:33:14 PM  
I'm thinking the only way those numbers are so low is that as a charity they get a few booths, but the usual Aramark folks (or similar) are selling the bulk of the stuff
 
2017-12-28 03:33:21 PM  
I suppose they have experience as to how many items per person tend to be sold. I don't know how everyone does it but if (for example) they average one food item and 1.5 drink items per person at the game, that will be split among the many different items on offer. Most people aren't going to specifically want a hot dog, they may want nachos or popcorn instead. 

The percentages don't sound that far off. When I work the concession stand at three hours' worth of kids' volleyball games, we get maybe 300 people coming through the doors, but we only sell about a dozen hot dogs. Other people buy popcorn or pretzels or candy or whatever. Probably 2/3 of the people there end up buying a drink of some sort, but it's split between water, soda, and gatorade.
 
2017-12-28 03:33:36 PM  

Lorenzo Von Matterhorn: Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.


Free Duff? Viva life!
 
2017-12-28 03:42:15 PM  

Hillbilly Jim: Lorenzo Von Matterhorn: martissimo: Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.

College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL

Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.

During the 1994 Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. UCLA, the stadium ran out of beer.  65,000 beers for 100,000 fans?  That's laughably low.

Obviously they didn't take into account Wisconsin.


Obviously. For any Badgers game, find out the number of Badger fans coming and multiply by 3. Then one each for everyone else. That should at least get you into the third quarter.

But that's the Orange Bowl's problem this year. Maybe for Georgia and OU, 65K beer is enough.
 
2017-12-28 04:11:18 PM  

Hillbilly Jim: Lorenzo Von Matterhorn: martissimo: Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.

College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL

Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.

During the 1994 Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. UCLA, the stadium ran out of beer.  65,000 beers for 100,000 fans?  That's laughably low.

Obviously they didn't take into account Wisconsin.


This.

We went to the Wisconsin - TCU Rose Bowl game a few years back.  2011 maybe..?

Anywho, we went out to bars the two nights before the game and ran into so many Wisconsin fans I thought we were back on State Street.  Also ran into two ex co workers I didn't even know were going..

The morning of the game we parked on whatever golf course is next to the stadium and played drinking games for a good 3 hours all while watching the TCU fans just walking to the stadium.  Some of the TCU fans were out drinking prior but not nearly on the alcoholic level of Wisconsin fans.  Why yes, some of us have a drinking problem..

/bought one beer in the stadium
//$10 for a Bud Light
///CSB
 
2017-12-28 04:29:06 PM  

martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.


You are reading it wrong, the 18000 hot dogs and 65000 beers are just for the 1000 volunteers.
 
2017-12-28 04:50:51 PM  

johnny_vegas: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

You are reading it wrong, the 18000 hot dogs and 65000 beers are just for the 1000 volunteers.


I will willingly volunteer, I'll go on the record with this!
 
2017-12-28 05:39:44 PM  
18,000 hot dogs?  That's a lot of hog anus.
 
2017-12-28 07:13:11 PM  
90, 000 fans, 65,000 beers?

I ...I know math, but these numbers make no sense.
 
2017-12-28 11:24:05 PM  
I cannot wait to have one of those beers and one of those hot dogs!

Should be an awesome game.
 
2017-12-28 11:59:30 PM  
What should frighten folks, is that MOST of those folks are essentially going to be concession stands folks, whose job is to put things onto plates or in cups, and pretty much MOST of the work will be done by a relatively small team.

At Glenndale Arena, where we had 16,000 seats, we'd typically do MOST of the concessions food, as well as the buffet and action stations' food, pizza, and food for the suites with a crew of 13-14. And we'd have enough time between us all to play around with garnishes and make time with the events staff and waitresses.

A lot of the event staff are just taking orders, delivering drinks, or cleaning up. The food is geared through a dedicated team that pretty much takes the guesswork out things for the concessions kiosks. They may be grilling dogs and burgers to order, but pretty much all of the kiosks are set up by event staff from the venue. And it's a frighteningly small number of folks for events like this. We did a few 65,000 seat venues, and literally we didn't even double up on staff. We added a ten person team to the crew we took in, and had more than enough staff to all get plenty of breaks, goof off, and even catch bits of the game. Concerts and festivals were easy enough that we'd do them with a reduced staff, and rotate folks out so that everyone could get a chance to catch some of the shows.

SEATED events, that's a whole different thing. That takes a whole lot of effort, and even then, for something like the NRA Convention in Phoenix, which was a 6000 person seated event, we brought an additional crew of 9 to bulk up the 14 on staff at the Convention Center, and we took all the appetizers, salads, desserts, and plated 1500 of the dinners, to give the Convention staff a bit of a break, and we had events during the day for seminars and events leading up to the big dinner, and we even had time to help the dishwashers, because they were getting crushed by the backlog because event servers managed to misplace some 6'x12" rolling racks of dishes. When you're doing events like this, NO ONE is above being a dishwasher. And mind you, our Regional Chef, who was in charge of all the venues in the Phoenix Metro area was the FIRST one to head to the pot sink. When it comes down to it, when you've got 10,000+ people all roaming around, you pitch in where you're needed. If you have time, and someone from a kiosk needs some help, you pitch in. If servers need a hand with trays and plated meals, you help them wheel them in. A kiosk gets behind, you help them pour beer. Or you grab them cups, or change kegs, or help the folks on register manage their orders and set them up with cups. Or you grill dogs until someone who got sent to get more register tape gets back. Big events like this, everyone pitches in, and it's the dedicated venue staff that roam around and make sure that the kiosks and part timers like concessions staff have everything they need to succeed.

The numbers of people to make something like this hum are often weird. Because the folks who make the events really work aren't the folks you will tend to see very often. And if you do, we for damn sure made sure that before we went out that we were presentable, even if we'd just wrestled a few hundred pizzas into a cooler or popped 30 prime ribs into a warmer.
 
2017-12-29 01:10:21 AM  
Yeah that number is low. I worked at a college football stadium with a bit smaller capacity than the Rose Bowl and part of the job was cleaning up on Sunday after the game. It would take two dozen people an entire shift just to clean the stadium and get rid of all the trash so I wonder how much of this will just be trashed? At that stadium, about everything left over would be thrown in the trash because local ordinances/policies stated they couldn't be refrigerated and donated to food banks, homeless shelters, etcetera. Such a fricking waste. Dozens of around 39 gallon bags of popcorn that just got tossed even though they were sealed and still pretty fresh.

Cleaning that stadium was a chore too, those fans were beyond slobs. The thing that sticks out to me was cleaning up all the nacho cheese dip that got spilled there. Once it sat overnight on a cool fall evening, that junk was like cement and I haven't touched it during a game since. "Want some chips and dip Dave?" "Thanks but I'll pass."
 
2017-12-29 08:56:38 AM  

Hillbilly Jim: Lorenzo Von Matterhorn: martissimo: Eli WhiskeyDik: martissimo: Other than the volunteers those numbers actually sound fairly low.

True. Especially the beer numbers which leads me to ask, aren't most college football games alcohol free? I'm assuming that the liability, in the case of a bowl game, does not fall upon either school so, it's allowed to be sold there.

College games alcohol free? I hate this term but...LOL

Remember, alcohol free does not mean the same thing as free alcohol.

During the 1994 Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs. UCLA, the stadium ran out of beer.  65,000 beers for 100,000 fans?  That's laughably low.

Obviously they didn't take into account Wisconsin.


It's what we do. The Rose Bowl has since learned their lesson when Wisconsin is involved.
/Wisconsinite
//Sober, but it's early...
 
Displayed 23 of 23 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report