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(Yahoo)   Amazon is taking over the world, because of one secret weapon that crushes the competition .... customer loyalty   ( finance.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Amazon, Stock, Percentage point, Business model, Time, Grocery store, Online shopping, Supermarket  
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1598 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Dec 2017 at 8:50 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-12-27 08:37:12 AM  
I'd move to Azure, but the migration costs are too high to justify.
 
2017-12-27 08:51:37 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size

To be fair, who wouldn't be loyal to that.
 
2017-12-27 09:12:20 AM  
Amazon has stood by everything I've bought off them, even when the seller has not. While they might allow a lot of shiatty vendors, they seem willing to still gurantee satisfaction even if it means a refund. Products Amazon stock also ship very quickly and in my experience are well packed.

I feel far more confident in buying off Amazon than I do eBay or Esty.

/that being said their streaming service sucks.
//interface more so than content.
///it's just painful to navigate, especially compared with Netflix and Hulu.
 
2017-12-27 09:21:36 AM  

pueblonative: [img.fark.net image 850x612][View Full Size image _x_]
To be fair, who wouldn't be loyal to that.


/I might be just a little disloyal
//what would the punishment be?
///asking for a friend.
 
2017-12-27 09:39:28 AM  
A few years ago the gasket for my dishwasher door failed. I decided to make that an opportunity to let the local retailers retain my business. So I decided to first go to Menards (a regional hardware store like Home Depot). When I pulled up I was greeted by the police breaking up a fist fight in the parking lot between two families. No luck on finding the gasket. Next I decided to try Home Depot and Lowes. Both were eager to sell me a new dishwasher, but no parts.

Finally I said "I know, Sears! They always had parts for appliances." Clearly it has been a while since I stepped foot in a Sears because the store looked deserted. Very few employees who chose to remain hidden and a small end cap with appliance parts that was half empty.

I went home and found the exact part I needed on Amazon within 5 minutes, for less than $15, and it arrived at my door in two days.

I don't like the fact that they are so dominant in retail, but it's kind of the case for a reason.
 
2017-12-27 09:42:59 AM  
In other words, customer service still means something.  I find myself buying from Amazon even if I could buy the same product cheaper on another website just because of how easy Amazon makes it to do everything, and because I know if there's a problem they'll make it right.

Plus, I'd rather not have my credit card information on dozens of websites, if Amazon stocks the majority of what I want to buy, it's easier to just keep all of my purchases in one place.
 
2017-12-27 09:44:46 AM  
It's the main place I shop online, but I don't really shop online much. I learned long ago that their prices aren't as great as most people think they are, and I can usually save 20-50% by shopping locally. Their prices also seem to fluctuate wildly on a regular basis.

I bought a pair of slippers last winter, I liked them so I thought about getting a new pair this year. I paid $17 for them, but this year they're $36. Also, pretty much everything I have on my wish list has gone up in price considerably since I added it. Inflation is one thing, but prices shouldn't fluctuate that drastically.

The only other online place I shop regularly is NewEgg, and I'll likely continue to shop for my computer needs there. As for Amazon, it's not so much loyalty as there's really no place else that offers one stop convenience that they do.
 
2017-12-27 09:51:00 AM  
I can only think of a handful of times I had a problem with something I ordered from Amazon, and each time it was resolved quickly. That's just not the case elsewhere.
 
2017-12-27 09:52:35 AM  

MightyPez: A few years ago the gasket for my dishwasher door failed. I decided to make that an opportunity to let the local retailers retain my business. So I decided to first go to Menards (a regional hardware store like Home Depot). When I pulled up I was greeted by the police breaking up a fist fight in the parking lot between two families. No luck on finding the gasket. Next I decided to try Home Depot and Lowes. Both were eager to sell me a new dishwasher, but no parts.

Finally I said "I know, Sears! They always had parts for appliances." Clearly it has been a while since I stepped foot in a Sears because the store looked deserted. Very few employees who chose to remain hidden and a small end cap with appliance parts that was half empty.

I went home and found the exact part I needed on Amazon within 5 minutes, for less than $15, and it arrived at my door in two days.

I don't like the fact that they are so dominant in retail, but it's kind of the case for a reason.


There are repair outlets, including Sears branded, that have appliance spare parts. None of the big box or appliance stores carry the parts themselves. It is weird but it makes sense that a specialty shop is better than the big stores holding the inventory.  Kind of like getting car parts from auto zone et all than the dealer.

If you don't need the part that day, Amazon is still better.

/learned all this when i had to get a dryer belt.
//who has clothes lines and pins anymore, even as back up?
///amazon is hurting lots if small parts vendors, like beer brew stores
 
2017-12-27 09:55:13 AM  
And why not?  Let the other manufacturers burn.  Bring on the robots.
 
2017-12-27 09:59:44 AM  
They're a cult, ban them, persecute them! .... ding dong .... Excuse me, someone's at the door .... thanks, yeah, Amazon Prime free shipping is awesome, have a great day .... where was I?  Oh, yeah, burn them! ....
 
2017-12-27 10:00:19 AM  

ReapTheChaos: It's the main place I shop online, but I don't really shop online much. I learned long ago that their prices aren't as great as most people think they are, and I can usually save 20-50% by shopping locally. Their prices also seem to fluctuate wildly on a regular basis.

I bought a pair of slippers last winter, I liked them so I thought about getting a new pair this year. I paid $17 for them, but this year they're $36. Also, pretty much everything I have on my wish list has gone up in price considerably since I added it. Inflation is one thing, but prices shouldn't fluctuate that drastically.

The only other online place I shop regularly is NewEgg, and I'll likely continue to shop for my computer needs there. As for Amazon, it's not so much loyalty as there's really no place else that offers one stop convenience that they do.


I think this is often due to the specific product no longer being produced and replaced by the exact same item with a different model number to reflect a new method, location, or year of production.

I noticed that happened to RAM I purchased two years ago. It was $100 when I purchased it, but shows up as $400 when I check my order history. I know RAM prices have risen, but not that much. Sure enough when I checked the same specifications I found the same brand with the same specs for $150 (RAM prices did indeed increase!) with a slightly different model number.
 
2017-12-27 10:09:44 AM  
Every 'brick and mortar' retailer left treats customers with thinly veiled contempt.

If the unwashed masses could figure a way to shoplift from Amazon, they'd be treating customers with contempt, too.

The internet is a fantastic insulator for their business. Sure, there are scams to some extent, but nothing like the daily onslaught you face at a physical location.

Amazon takes their customer's side in any dispute. You can do that when your business model doesn't depend on you making money. For now...
 
2017-12-27 10:14:39 AM  
I bought some khakis online from JC Penney as they had Dockers on sale at a better price and size selection than Amazon.  They arrive and don't quite fit right.  So I go to the store to return them....  That was my first mistake.  Since the stores are failing, each store is way understaffed.  The racks of pants were like going thru a trash heap.  Pants just tossed in piles and not re-folded because no staff was around to do that.  I finally found the right size, then went to customer service to exchange them.  That was my second mistake.  Long lines and testy customers, crying toddlers... made it a miserable experience.  I told the wife, this is why Amazon is eating their lunch.  Never again.
 
2017-12-27 10:24:02 AM  

Schlubbe: Every 'brick and mortar' retailer left treats customers with thinly veiled contempt.


One reason is the number of people who pose as customers to look at, try on, play with a product in a store with no intention of buying it there.
/ That's not the main reason, but it's one reason.
 
2017-12-27 10:29:08 AM  

Schlubbe: Amazon takes their customer's side in any dispute. You can do that when your business model doesn't depend on you making money. For now...


This. AWS is making money hand-over-fist, they can run the retail side at a loss to run brick-and-mortars out of business.
 
2017-12-27 10:30:52 AM  

MightyPez: I think this is often due to the specific product no longer being produced and replaced by the exact same item with a different model number to reflect a new method, location, or year of production.

I noticed that happened to RAM I purchased two years ago. It was $100 when I purchased it, but shows up as $400 when I check my order history. I know RAM prices have risen, but not that much. Sure enough when I checked the same specifications I found the same brand with the same specs for $150 (RAM prices did indeed increase!) with a slightly different model number.


That's partly (or even mostly) because of pricing bots online.

Once an item goes out of production, smaller companies with the thing still in stock start edging their prices up, a little at a time. It's mostly just a dollar or two per gadget, but the bots start getting into competitive loops that cause them to keep increasing their prices. That's how you get a stick of RAM that's twice what it used to cost. In a lot of cases, the sellers forget to put maximum prices on their items, which is how you get $30,000 listings on toys that should cost $19.95.

The theory on this is supposedly that the folks buying (for example) RAM are trying to match their older pieces, so they'll pay a little bit more - or a lot more... and some of them are companies that don't worry that much about pricing.
 
2017-12-27 10:31:54 AM  

Imperialism: This. AWS is making money hand-over-fist, they can run the retail side at a loss to run brick-and-mortars out of business.


They're not running at a loss. Amazon actually makes money on the non-AWS side.
 
2017-12-27 10:41:19 AM  

MightyPez: ReapTheChaos: It's the main place I shop online, but I don't really shop online much. I learned long ago that their prices aren't as great as most people think they are, and I can usually save 20-50% by shopping locally. Their prices also seem to fluctuate wildly on a regular basis.

I bought a pair of slippers last winter, I liked them so I thought about getting a new pair this year. I paid $17 for them, but this year they're $36. Also, pretty much everything I have on my wish list has gone up in price considerably since I added it. Inflation is one thing, but prices shouldn't fluctuate that drastically.

The only other online place I shop regularly is NewEgg, and I'll likely continue to shop for my computer needs there. As for Amazon, it's not so much loyalty as there's really no place else that offers one stop convenience that they do.

I think this is often due to the specific product no longer being produced and replaced by the exact same item with a different model number to reflect a new method, location, or year of production.

I noticed that happened to RAM I purchased two years ago. It was $100 when I purchased it, but shows up as $400 when I check my order history. I know RAM prices have risen, but not that much. Sure enough when I checked the same specifications I found the same brand with the same specs for $150 (RAM prices did indeed increase!) with a slightly different model number.


I still buy most computer parts from our local Microcenter. I know I can find a better price if I look around, but they are usually in stock and I can BS with the in-store neckbeards about Dr. Who or Star Trek for a bit before leaving. They don't hard sell me because they know my computer as well as I do.

Pretty much everything else? Amazon.
 
2017-12-27 10:46:42 AM  
If you want the "popular" products, then yeah, brick-and-mortar stores have those. Every store carries the "bestsellers" in every category.

If you want something else? Forget it. You won't find it at a brick-and-mortar store. But Amazon has it. And they'll deliver it to you in 2 days.

Brick-and-mortar stores can't compete with that. Which is fine. They can all go out of business for all I care. The entire "retail" industry is goofy, and deserves to die. There's no reason to have a middle-man taking a cut of every sale of every product. Not anymore.
 
2017-12-27 10:49:16 AM  

rummonkey: MightyPez: ReapTheChaos: It's the main place I shop online, but I don't really shop online much. I learned long ago that their prices aren't as great as most people think they are, and I can usually save 20-50% by shopping locally. Their prices also seem to fluctuate wildly on a regular basis.

I bought a pair of slippers last winter, I liked them so I thought about getting a new pair this year. I paid $17 for them, but this year they're $36. Also, pretty much everything I have on my wish list has gone up in price considerably since I added it. Inflation is one thing, but prices shouldn't fluctuate that drastically.

The only other online place I shop regularly is NewEgg, and I'll likely continue to shop for my computer needs there. As for Amazon, it's not so much loyalty as there's really no place else that offers one stop convenience that they do.

I think this is often due to the specific product no longer being produced and replaced by the exact same item with a different model number to reflect a new method, location, or year of production.

I noticed that happened to RAM I purchased two years ago. It was $100 when I purchased it, but shows up as $400 when I check my order history. I know RAM prices have risen, but not that much. Sure enough when I checked the same specifications I found the same brand with the same specs for $150 (RAM prices did indeed increase!) with a slightly different model number.

I still buy most computer parts from our local Microcenter. I know I can find a better price if I look around, but they are usually in stock and I can BS with the in-store neckbeards about Dr. Who or Star Trek for a bit before leaving. They don't hard sell me because they know my computer as well as I do.

Pretty much everything else? Amazon.


Oh for sure. I don't know how Microcenter does it, but they are damn good at being competitive with the online retailers. I was actually debating running over there today for the $10 32GB micro SD card and a spare pi zero w. I just wish they would open more locations. The only one in my state is west of Minneapolis, meaning I have to drive through 2 urban areas to reach it.

I only had one bad experience there when I was grabbing a few copies of Office for a business, and the young sales clerk decided that it would be a good time to argue with me that I didn't need to buy 3 copies, because you can install it 3 times. I had to have him talk to his manager to explain how software licensing works and it is different for home and business use. I was able to later convince said business to purchase a volume license agreement to avoid that nonsense.
 
2017-12-27 10:55:22 AM  

realmolo: If you want the "popular" products, then yeah, brick-and-mortar stores have those. Every store carries the "bestsellers" in every category.

If you want something else? Forget it. You won't find it at a brick-and-mortar store. But Amazon has it. And they'll deliver it to you in 2 days.

Brick-and-mortar stores can't compete with that. Which is fine. They can all go out of business for all I care. The entire "retail" industry is goofy, and deserves to die. There's no reason to have a middle-man taking a cut of every sale of every product. Not anymore.


" 'bout 50% of the human race is middlemen, and they don't take kindly to being eliminated" - Malcolm Reynolds

Statistically speaking, your job is most likely funded by being some sort of middleman. Just saying
 
2017-12-27 10:56:01 AM  
Amazon is usually the go-to option simply because of the ease and reliability. However, their delivery service sucks. Any time I've had something delivered late it's always been from an Amazon driver, most recently jut the other day where something was promised before Christmas. Said it was out for delivery all day, then got an email saying it was undeliverable because the driver couldn't access my driveway/front door (impossible), then a follow up email to that one said my package was lost in transit.
 
2017-12-27 11:07:39 AM  
We used to live near a Micro Center too, and I went all the time. But now it's about an hour away. We still make a visit once a year or so, but I also buy the stuff they sell a little less often now. I guess I did spend more on computers and tech books back when I was in their store 50 times a year.

Looks like most others here see the same simple Amazon secret - they solve any and all problems easily and fairly. The only B&M place in the same league for me is Costco. Decent prices + always solving customer problems, and there's rarely anything to motivate me to shop around elsewhere.
 
2017-12-27 11:10:59 AM  

tjsands1118: Amazon has stood by everything I've bought off them, even when the seller has not. While they might allow a lot of shiatty vendors, they seem willing to still gurantee satisfaction even if it means a refund. Products Amazon stock also ship very quickly and in my experience are well packed.

I feel far more confident in buying off Amazon than I do eBay or Esty.

/that being said their streaming service sucks.
//interface more so than content.
///it's just painful to navigate, especially compared with Netflix and Hulu.


The Prime Video just ends up with me rage quitting over the lack of alphabetical order. I don't want to have to search through 3000 pages of results (since you can't change how many are shown on a page) in no particular order just to find out what show I want to watch is even available, since looking for individual shows will result 99% of the time with a paid rental.
 
2017-12-27 11:23:46 AM  

limeyfellow: tjsands1118: Amazon has stood by everything I've bought off them, even when the seller has not. While they might allow a lot of shiatty vendors, they seem willing to still gurantee satisfaction even if it means a refund. Products Amazon stock also ship very quickly and in my experience are well packed.

I feel far more confident in buying off Amazon than I do eBay or Esty.

/that being said their streaming service sucks.
//interface more so than content.
///it's just painful to navigate, especially compared with Netflix and Hulu.

The Prime Video just ends up with me rage quitting over the lack of alphabetical order. I don't want to have to search through 3000 pages of results (since you can't change how many are shown on a page) in no particular order just to find out what show I want to watch is even available, since looking for individual shows will result 99% of the time with a paid rental.


Yep, also I own two seasons of the simpsons, if I scroll one click pass the first episode it takes me to the previous season, then when I return to the season I want it resets me back to the episode I lasted watched and makes me scroll all the way back agian. It's very annoying.

/netflix system is the best for navigation.
//hulu isn't terrible, but they library of clips tend to get in the way when actually searching.
 
2017-12-27 11:36:30 AM  

cirby: Imperialism: This. AWS is making money hand-over-fist, they can run the retail side at a loss to run brick-and-mortars out of business.

They're not running at a loss. Amazon actually makes money on the non-AWS side.


THIS.  Both AWS and Retail operations are profitable.  However - AWS faces stiffer competition on on the than on the online retail side.  Oracle, Microsoft, and Google (and maaaaaybe IBM) are proving to be serious competitors.
 
2017-12-27 11:44:09 AM  
I've always maintained that what crushes mom and pop stores and smaller businesses is good customer service. Go to a Walmart and they have stuff in stock. Return something and it's hardly a hassle. Now go to the poor little place that's next door and trying to compete and see what sort of stock they have. Look at their awful return policy too. I've been to places where they literally said 'come back on Thursday because Steve will be in and he handles that stuff'. The same thing applies to online shopping now. Amazon is crushing their competition not because of pricing but because of awesome customer service.
 
2017-12-27 12:06:25 PM  
I live overseas (with an FPO and Diplomatic pouch address), and Amazon is amazing.  The embassy mailroom on delivery days looks like an Amazon warehouse.  They'll deliver pretty much anything you would want in less than 3 weeks, and when a package comes through damaged they'll replace it for free, no questions asked, no need to return the broken item.  No one else makes it that easy to shop on-line.
 
2017-12-27 12:12:48 PM  

realmolo: Brick-and-mortar stores can't compete with that. Which is fine. They can all go out of business for all I care. The entire "retail" industry is goofy, and deserves to die. There's no reason to have a middle-man taking a cut of every sale of every product. Not anymore.


I ... uh ... hmmm. You do realize that Amazon is the middle-man here, right? Not taking a big cut of every sale is only an interim step. Once they drive all retail out of business, you can be assured they're going to jack up their prices.
 
2017-12-27 12:24:54 PM  

Schlubbe: realmolo: If you want the "popular" products, then yeah, brick-and-mortar stores have those. Every store carries the "bestsellers" in every category.

If you want something else? Forget it. You won't find it at a brick-and-mortar store. But Amazon has it. And they'll deliver it to you in 2 days.

Brick-and-mortar stores can't compete with that. Which is fine. They can all go out of business for all I care. The entire "retail" industry is goofy, and deserves to die. There's no reason to have a middle-man taking a cut of every sale of every product. Not anymore.

" 'bout 50% of the human race is middlemen, and they don't take kindly to being eliminated" - Malcolm Reynolds

Statistically speaking, your job is most likely funded by being some sort of middleman. Just saying


Isn't the whole service industry technically middlemen?
 
2017-12-27 12:42:14 PM  

ImpendingCynic: realmolo: Brick-and-mortar stores can't compete with that. Which is fine. They can all go out of business for all I care. The entire "retail" industry is goofy, and deserves to die. There's no reason to have a middle-man taking a cut of every sale of every product. Not anymore.

I ... uh ... hmmm. You do realize that Amazon is the middle-man here, right? Not taking a big cut of every sale is only an interim step. Once they drive all retail out of business, you can be assured they're going to jack up their prices.


Name checks out :)
 
2017-12-27 12:46:07 PM  

Schlubbe: Every 'brick and mortar' retailer left treats customers with thinly veiled contempt.

If the unwashed masses could figure a way to shoplift from Amazon, they'd be treating customers with contempt, too.

The internet is a fantastic insulator for their business. Sure, there are scams to some extent, but nothing like the daily onslaught you face at a physical location.

Amazon takes their customer's side in any dispute. You can do that when your business model doesn't depend on you making money. For now...


Oh look, someone doesn't know how half of Amazon sales work.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/2​5​9782/third-party-seller-share-of-amazo​n-platform/

Amazon does not lose a cent on refunds for 3rd party sales. They, in fact, MAKE money, because they still often take their cut of the sale (used to be 15%; not sure now), even if the sale is later refunded (depends on context of the refund, and whether fraud is suspected).

And exactly what does making customer refunds have to do with making money? If refunds account for, say, 3% of your in-house sales (remember, Amazon pulls in 15% of the 50% of their sales that are 3rd party) then you still have sales of 97% of your gross. If your model is profitable then you are still making money. If your model is not profitable, then (a) it is not due to the paltry amount of refunds, and (b) not making those refunds won't offset your essential unprofitability.

Been in business as CFO/Controller/Accounting Manager for 45 years. 3rd party Amazon seller for 12 of those.
 
2017-12-27 12:48:56 PM  
It worked so well for Blockbuster.
 
2017-12-27 01:48:45 PM  

fsufan: I bought some khakis online from JC Penney as they had Dockers on sale at a better price and size selection than Amazon.  They arrive and don't quite fit right.  So I go to the store to return them....  That was my first mistake.  Since the stores are failing, each store is way understaffed.  The racks of pants were like going thru a trash heap.  Pants just tossed in piles and not re-folded because no staff was around to do that.  I finally found the right size, then went to customer service to exchange them.  That was my second mistake.  Long lines and testy customers, crying toddlers... made it a miserable experience.  I told the wife, this is why Amazon is eating their lunch.  Never again.


I bought some jeans from JC Penney's a couple months ago because they don't carry my short & stocky size in stores. Forgot about the order until a few weeks later. Checked the online status & they were supposed to be delivered two weeks earlier, but the status was "Waiting for pickup" from the distribution location. So I called and cancelled the order. They only refunded $55 of the $80 I paid. I was pissed, but too busy to deal with it at the time.

Three days later, my cancelled order arrived.

We probably place 3-10 orders with Amazon a month. Never had an issue.
 
2017-12-27 02:46:28 PM  
I have no loyalty to Amazon.  None.  They're a big greedy corporation.  I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else.  The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.
 
2017-12-27 02:50:24 PM  

NewWorldDan: I have no loyalty to Amazon.  None.  They're a big greedy corporation.  I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else.  The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.


You say you have no loyalty to Amazon but in the same post you tell us that every non-NewEgg purchase you make is Amazon. Sounds to me like you know that Amazon is reliable but just want to be edgy.
 
2017-12-27 02:56:54 PM  

rummonkey


NewWorldDan: I have no loyalty to Amazon. None. They're a big greedy corporation. I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else. The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.

You say you have no loyalty to Amazon but in the same post you tell us that every non-NewEgg purchase you make is Amazon. Sounds to me like you know that Amazon is reliable but just want to be edgy.


I think his point was that if another company came along and offered better deals and faster shipping than Amazon, he would ditch Amazon and start using the other company.

Using something because it's the best option doesn't necessarily connote loyalty.
 
2017-12-27 02:58:58 PM  
Wait.... there are people who don't buy their stuff through Amazon?

I'm hoping the day will come when I can just upload my shopping list to Amazon and have delivery by drone or robot to my door within a few hours... so I can say goodbye to WalMart.
 
2017-12-27 03:03:43 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: rummonkey

NewWorldDan: I have no loyalty to Amazon. None. They're a big greedy corporation. I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else. The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.

You say you have no loyalty to Amazon but in the same post you tell us that every non-NewEgg purchase you make is Amazon. Sounds to me like you know that Amazon is reliable but just want to be edgy.


I think his point was that if another company came along and offered better deals and faster shipping than Amazon, he would ditch Amazon and start using the other company.

Using something because it's the best option doesn't necessarily connote loyalty.


I dunno, if Amazon is your first place to go I think they won the loyalty game.
 
2017-12-27 03:16:21 PM  

MightyPez: A few years ago the gasket for my dishwasher door failed. I decided to make that an opportunity to let the local retailers retain my business. So I decided to first go to Menards (a regional hardware store like Home Depot). When I pulled up I was greeted by the police breaking up a fist fight in the parking lot between two families. No luck on finding the gasket. Next I decided to try Home Depot and Lowes. Both were eager to sell me a new dishwasher, but no parts.

Finally I said "I know, Sears! They always had parts for appliances." Clearly it has been a while since I stepped foot in a Sears because the store looked deserted. Very few employees who chose to remain hidden and a small end cap with appliance parts that was half empty.

I went home and found the exact part I needed on Amazon within 5 minutes, for less than $15, and it arrived at my door in two days.

I don't like the fact that they are so dominant in retail, but it's kind of the case for a reason.


I have walked into stores cash in hand bellowing "take my money" and they haven't been man enough to do so. Amazon got my business by having all the stuff I ask for, and giving it to me quickly.
 
2017-12-27 03:31:21 PM  

rummonkey: Englebert Slaptyback: rummonkey

NewWorldDan: I have no loyalty to Amazon. None. They're a big greedy corporation. I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else. The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.

You say you have no loyalty to Amazon but in the same post you tell us that every non-NewEgg purchase you make is Amazon. Sounds to me like you know that Amazon is reliable but just want to be edgy.


I think his point was that if another company came along and offered better deals and faster shipping than Amazon, he would ditch Amazon and start using the other company.

Using something because it's the best option doesn't necessarily connote loyalty.

I dunno, if Amazon is your first place to go I think they won the loyalty game.


I'm the same way; Amazon is just one of the many places I'll go when looking to buy something.  I have Prime, but it isn't from brand loyalty - it's for movies and tv shows that Netflix and Hulu don't have (between the three I really don't need anything else).

For actual shopping, I really don't like Amazon all that much...things can be hard to find, generic filters, searching can be iffy -- I've searched for exact product names and didn't find the GPU and typed in generic GPU specs and found it...ditto on some cameras, random tools...it's damn annoying.  If Amazon had more specialized departments versus a generic setup for everything they would be a lot better and I'd go there first, but instead I go to the specialized places first and use Amazon as a place to maybe find a better price.

I could care less about the shipping times.  I live in a good area as far as that goes.  There hasn't been a single item I've ordered in 8 years that took more than three days from any place...not including the stuff I ordered from China and I knew would take a while or the one time I ordered a package during an ice storm and it was held up for a day...it's an ice storm...delays happen and I expected that.  Even the two packages I've ever ordered from China arrived one and two weeks early (A six weeks came in four and a four weeks came in three).
 
2017-12-27 03:37:43 PM  

tjsands1118: /that being said their streaming service sucks.
//interface more so than content.
///it's just painful to navigate, especially compared with Netflix and Hulu.


VERY much this. The interface blows.
 
2017-12-27 03:38:36 PM  

tjsands1118: Amazon has stood by everything I've bought off them, even when the seller has not. While they might allow a lot of shiatty vendors, they seem willing to still gurantee satisfaction even if it means a refund. Products Amazon stock also ship very quickly and in my experience are well packed.

I feel far more confident in buying off Amazon than I do eBay or Esty.

/that being said their streaming service sucks.
//interface more so than content.
///it's just painful to navigate, especially compared with Netflix and Hulu.


Just had a delivery today by Amazon, when I wasn't there the driver actually phoned me and worked out a delivery schedule.

As opposed to FedEx or UPS who usually don't bother even buzzing just slapping he notice on the door and taking it to the pick up point (and UPS driver once telling me the traffic was bad so he wasn't even going to bother with that except the box was big and he didn't want it in his truck the next day).

Amazon customer service has been top notch every time I have dealt with them. I put in the wrong address? No problem, refunded and I can just reorder it. They sent the wrong item? No problem, they will have the right thing out that day on overnight.

The only other major retailer that has come close to as consistently positive of an experience for me has been CostCo. The only issues I have had with Amazon orders have been dealing wth FedEx and UPS.
 
2017-12-27 03:48:13 PM  

Fano: I have walked into stores cash in hand bellowing "take my money" and they haven't been man enough to do so. Amazon got my business by having all the stuff I ask for, and giving it to me quickly.


I really wish there was a place that was nothing more than a dedicated showroom floor so I could physically see what I was going to order, test stuff out, have an actual return center, a layaway program, a way to try on clothing before ordering, possible made to fit/order clothing.

I think it's a business model that could work and would also mean the return of knowledgeable sales staff and bring an intimate customer relationship to an otherwise faceless and inhuman online entity.

Go in, check stuff out, order it, and it shows up at home in a few days.  Item sucks or wrong or ???  Take it back to the store.  Maybe hold a few popular things on hand...game consoles, hot ticket items, etc...basically Sears with Amazon's efficiency & logistics with some people to do clothing measurements...
 
2017-12-27 03:53:07 PM  

hashtag.acronym: rummonkey: Englebert Slaptyback: rummonkey

NewWorldDan: I have no loyalty to Amazon. None. They're a big greedy corporation. I keep buying stuff there because it's quick, easy, and it reliably shows up 48 hours later, and I rarely find a better deal anywhere else. The only online store I have any loyalty to is NewEgg.

You say you have no loyalty to Amazon but in the same post you tell us that every non-NewEgg purchase you make is Amazon. Sounds to me like you know that Amazon is reliable but just want to be edgy.


I think his point was that if another company came along and offered better deals and faster shipping than Amazon, he would ditch Amazon and start using the other company.

Using something because it's the best option doesn't necessarily connote loyalty.

I dunno, if Amazon is your first place to go I think they won the loyalty game.

I'm the same way; Amazon is just one of the many places I'll go when looking to buy something.  I have Prime, but it isn't from brand loyalty - it's for movies and tv shows that Netflix and Hulu don't have (between the three I really don't need anything else).

For actual shopping, I really don't like Amazon all that much...things can be hard to find, generic filters, searching can be iffy -- I've searched for exact product names and didn't find the GPU and typed in generic GPU specs and found it...ditto on some cameras, random tools...it's damn annoying.  If Amazon had more specialized departments versus a generic setup for everything they would be a lot better and I'd go there first, but instead I go to the specialized places first and use Amazon as a place to maybe find a better price.

I could care less about the shipping times.  I live in a good area as far as that goes.  There hasn't been a single item I've ordered in 8 years that took more than three days from any place...not including the stuff I ordered from China and I knew would take a while or the one time I ordered a package during an ice storm and it was held ...


That's the thing though. Brand loyalty doesn't exist like it used to, where my grandmother would swear my JC Penny for everything and grandpa swore by Sears. We have a much more mercenary outlook on consumerism and that loyalty only lasts until the next app or online portal comes up that is slightly better. Our loyalty is only minute to minute any more. If a NEWER Egg popped up today and was better in every way to the now Old Egg, those loyal shoppers will be jumping right away.

Loyalty doesn't exist the way it used to.
 
2017-12-27 03:53:49 PM  

dywed88: As opposed to FedEx or UPS who usually don't bother even buzzing just slapping he notice on the door and taking it to the pick up point (and UPS driver once telling me the traffic was bad so he wasn't even going to bother with that except the box was big and he didn't want it in his truck the next day).


So much that.  2/3 of my USPS carriers leave stuff without knocking and UPS/FedEx have knocked once in the past 4 years (UPS a while back)...the DHL Freight people were most courteous and helpful.  Never had experience with actual Amazon delivery people.

Q: What can brown do for you?

A: Leave $300 worth of telescope eyepieces on the porch in the rain and not knock on the door when there are three vehicles in the driveway.  Luckily I have a dog that informs me when people come around and don't knock.
 
2017-12-27 04:39:31 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Amazon is usually the go-to option simply because of the ease and reliability. However, their delivery service sucks. Any time I've had something delivered late it's always been from an Amazon driver, most recently jut the other day where something was promised before Christmas. Said it was out for delivery all day, then got an email saying it was undeliverable because the driver couldn't access my driveway/front door (impossible), then a follow up email to that one said my package was lost in transit.


Your story sucks.,
 
2017-12-27 04:45:46 PM  

rummonkey: That's the thing though. Brand loyalty doesn't exist like it used to, where my grandmother would swear my JC Penny for everything and grandpa swore by Sears. We have a much more mercenary outlook on consumerism and that loyalty only lasts until the next app or online portal comes up that is slightly better. Our loyalty is only minute to minute any more. If a NEWER Egg popped up today and was better in every way to the now Old Egg, those loyal shoppers will be jumping right away.

Loyalty doesn't exist the way it used to.


For me brand loyalty exists, but just not for that many retail places; online, local, or whatever.  I have loyalties to certain brands and products that I've had good experiences with and I'm less likely to buy from a brand that's given me bad experiences in the past...as to where I get the products I'm loyal to...whatever has the best price when I have the money to buy or whatever makes the most economical sense; like going to Lowes in town or the wholesaler a county over...sometimes Lowes costs more but I make up for it in with the gas price difference or vice-versa.

Damn, I wish I had a Home Depot or any other quality hardware store as an option before I have to drive to the wholesaler.
 
2017-12-27 05:05:08 PM  
If Amazon didn't have good deals and fast shipping I wouldn't buy from them, loyalty be damned, if I wanted shiat service and/or super slow shipping I could go to Ebay, or any of the rapidly shrinking number of local retailers.
 
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