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(BBC-US)   Parents are giving children alcohol too young, say researchers who obviously don't have any   ( bbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, alcohol, parents, children alcohol, socially advantaged children, ethnic minority parents, Alcoholic beverage, Prof Jennifer Maggs, body fat composition  
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815 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Dec 2017 at 10:36 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2017-12-15 07:51:11 PM  
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My kids get nothing younger than 12.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2017-12-15 07:56:35 PM  
I had more alcohol before I was 16 than after I was 16. And look how I turned out. So parents, if you want your kids to grow up to waste time on the internet, by all means give them liquor.
 
2017-12-15 08:16:10 PM  
Mainly because

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2017-12-15 08:23:32 PM  
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2017-12-15 08:36:18 PM  
Meanwhile, on my other tab.
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2017-12-15 09:57:33 PM  
Well, duh. Kids don't even have the fine motor skills to hold a martini glass properly until they're like 9 or 10. That's why the kids should have their mixed drinks served in a highball glass.

"Do not allow children to mix drinks. It is unseemly and they use too much vermouth."  --  Steve Allen
 
2017-12-15 10:43:46 PM  
I've been watching The Nanny on Logo, and I'd swear Brighton's been drinking wine coolers. Were there other beverages in almost identical containers to that alcopop?
 
2017-12-15 11:07:44 PM  
"It's never too young to give it to them" - Roy Moore.
 
2017-12-15 11:15:22 PM  
Hm. I always used to give mine the Bottle O'Nyquil. I guess it does have alcohol in it.
 
2017-12-15 11:17:49 PM  
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2017-12-15 11:24:51 PM  
Give the researchers some alcohol. Then they'll have kids.
 
2017-12-15 11:25:15 PM  
So my plan to get my kid blackout drunk on cheap vodka when he's ten in order to make him averse to alcohol may not be the best plan?
 
2017-12-15 11:36:15 PM  

GodComplex: So my plan to get my kid blackout drunk on cheap vodka when he's ten in order to make him averse to alcohol may not be the best plan?


Certainly not. That's too old to discourage them. Try 9 and a 1/2.
 
2017-12-15 11:59:21 PM  
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/Unimpressed by the findings
 
amb
2017-12-16 12:00:16 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Well, duh. Kids don't even have the fine motor skills to hold a martini glass properly until they're like 9 or 10. That's why the kids should have their mixed drinks served in a highball glass.

"Do not allow children to mix drinks. It is unseemly and they use too much vermouth."  --  Steve Allen


I think a tumbler might be better for kids. Less tippy.

At my company holiday party this year, they allowed kids to attend. It was at the Udvar-Hazy Center Smithsonian Air and Space museum (which was awesome). I thought the caterers didn't think things through. For beverages they only had wine and martini glasses. My daughter is mostly used to sippy cups and other spill resistant drink ware. She has a bad habit of taking a sip, then dropping her cup. I was paranoid that she would drop her glass and it would go all over an exhibit. There were a lot of kids there her age. I was waiting to hear that someone wrecked the Blackbird or Discovery.
 
2017-12-16 12:04:27 AM  
Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."


I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.
 
2017-12-16 12:25:05 AM  

Garza and the Supermutants: Meanwhile, on my other tab.
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Yes, it looks like the proper drinks for adults are in the other sections.
 
2017-12-16 12:27:57 AM  

Bedstead Polisher: Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."

I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.


They left out the *in countries that support prohibition but don't have the balls to come out and say it because they last time they tried it everyone told them what ridiculous cockbags they were

After "there is little research"
 
2017-12-16 12:32:28 AM  

Bedstead Polisher: Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."

I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.


Yes, I thought this was fairly well established.

My kids (2.5 and 4) both went through phases of interest in adult beverages. My older one is over it, my younger one will still snatch the beer bottle from your hand but no longer dips his finger in my bourbon. I suppose when they get older we'll do some other form of that training.
 
2017-12-16 12:44:17 AM  

wax_on: Bedstead Polisher: Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."

I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.

Yes, I thought this was fairly well established.

My kids (2.5 and 4) both went through phases of interest in adult beverages. My older one is over it, my younger one will still snatch the beer bottle from your hand but no longer dips his finger in my bourbon. I suppose when they get older we'll do some other form of that training.


My oldest is 2 and a half and damnit that boy loves beer.
 
2017-12-16 12:48:38 AM  
Drinking in England is something that's pretty hard-core. I was introduced to Babycham, 'Baby Champagne' when I was 11, at a friend's house in Nottingham. 

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No joke, this is literally champagne for kids. Everyone likes to talk about stereotypes; drinking as a kid in England is very, very real.
 
2017-12-16 01:04:04 AM  

wildcardjack: I've been watching The Nanny on Logo, and I'd swear Brighton's been drinking wine coolers. Were there other beverages in almost identical containers to that alcopop?


You should have run this post by me. I would have advised that in order to salvage pride you should avoid most of it and state YOU were the one drinking wine coolers. Yeah, still not great, but....damage control.
 
2017-12-16 03:02:20 AM  

WelldeadLink: Give the researchers some alcohol. Then they'll have kids.


My work here is done.

/cannababies4life
 
2017-12-16 03:10:39 AM  

Znuh: drinking as a kid in England is very, very real.


Snowball.

That's the drink the kiddos got at Hogmany parties I attended in Scotland. I swear it's rather surreal being bullied on the dancefloor by cocktail-weilding half-cut 9 year olds, whilst being molested by their wine-high single mothers.

I f*cking love Scotland, but damn does that nation have an alcohol problem.
 
2017-12-16 03:38:47 AM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: [i.imgur.com image 850x719][View Full Size image _x_]


StatelyGreekAutomaton: [i.pinimg.com image 324x324][View Full Size image _x_]


Wait a minute... the Wee Baby Seamus is Drunk Baby!
 
2017-12-16 08:51:06 AM  

wax_on: Bedstead Polisher: Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."

I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.

Yes, I thought this was fairly well established.

My kids (2.5 and 4) both went through phases of interest in adult beverages. My older one is over it, my younger one will still snatch the beer bottle from your hand but no longer dips his finger in my bourbon. I suppose when they get older we'll do some other form of that training.


When I was a kid, I would ask for a taste of whatever my dad was drinking and never liked it. The only time I did was when he would put slices of peaches or watermelon into a glass of wine, let it soak and I'd eat the fruit. Classic summer treat.
I just googled this and there are countless recipes for this, but you can just let them soak in whatever red wine you were already drinking for about 20 minutes, no need to add anything fancy.
 
2017-12-16 08:51:58 AM  
I still have the small crystal wine glasses my brother and I used at dinner, and I used to take sips out of my dad's martinis (and he put extra olives in for me) when he was home.

This is when I started drinking:
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I got cirrhosis due to alcoholic hepatitis at age 47, just like my father. He didn't stop drinking and died a very painful death within a year. I quit the day I was diagnosed (9/19/16) and I no longer need to get paracentisis (where they suck the fluid out of your abdomen) due to ascites, because my liver seems to have repaired itself - my liver tests recently came back normal.

I really don't think about drinking very often, but I do miss drinking some of the more tasty concoctions. If I am at the edge of death in the future, I am going to sit down and sip a good bottle of tequila. Followed by a good bottle of whiskey. Followed by a good bottle of rum. Followed....

Sometime in March I will have officially lived longer than my dad did.
 
2017-12-16 10:34:00 AM  

Znuh: Drinking in England is something that's pretty hard-core. I was introduced to Babycham, 'Baby Champagne' when I was 11, at a friend's house in Nottingham. 

[ichef.bbci.co.uk image 304x429]

No joke, this is literally champagne for kids. Everyone likes to talk about stereotypes; drinking as a kid in England is very, very real.


No it isn't. That's a drawing of an adult in the ad. Baby just alludes to the small size of the bottles.
 
2017-12-16 10:46:39 AM  
So "a new study" has found "an alarming connection."

I hereby invoke the "Headline Grabbing Research Rule" and will now inquire as to:

1) Funding of study
2) Study methology
3) Replicability of results
4) Falsifiablity of the underlying hypothesis.

I have not read TFA but I'm willing to bet this is a molding bottle of weak sauce.
 
2017-12-16 10:57:57 AM  
Okay, back from investigating the source a little bit.

Sample size is quite large, and funding is from public universities, so this doesn't look like a Family Research Council special.

Two things that leap out at me:

1) I don't see any gradation here. "Parents who let their children drink alcohol" seems to be a binary. No difference seems to be made between my grandfather who let me sip his scotch so I'd hate it, and parents who watch as their kids get plowed at Christmas dinner.

2) I don't much education in statistics, but if I'm reading this correctly, it looks like they asked 18,000 people three questions and then drew conclusions without tracking of those three sets actually intersected.

From TFS:

"Logistic regression calculated odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals in models predicting parents permitting alcohol use by sociodemographic predictors and prior parent alcohol use (Model 1), and then with child alcohol use at 11 years added [6] (Model 2). To address small amounts of missing data on some predictor variables, which ranged from 0% (gender, ethnicity, age) to 9% (parent and child alcohol use), we imputed 20 datasets using chained regressions.'

I seem to remember reading that 95% confidence is still pretty fuzzy. Anyone with more statistics education than me want to address that?
 
2017-12-16 11:19:39 AM  
Oh please. In my family you're having wine with Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner at the age of 12. Grandma used to get extra cherries in her Manhattans so she could give out the alcohol infused Globes of goodness to her grandchildren at family gatherings. This started much younger than 12.

I remember one year at Easter sitting around talking with my uncles who were trying to plan the Mother's Day gathering for that year. One of them said "well it's Mother's Day. Why don't we just get a keg?". And then they did!

Every year at our yearly family vacation it would be happy hour from 5 until 7 before dinner. Again with the Manhattan soaked cherries.

One of my cousins got wasted at Age 2 and 1/2 at a family graduation party. He was drinking the water that had formed from the melted ice in the washtub that The Keg was in. Nobody realize there was actual beer in it as well. That kid is now an astrophysicist.

So in my book it's never too young. Although I do draw the line at filling baby bottles with whiskey or other things like that. I always thought that's what wine coolers were for.
 
2017-12-16 12:20:27 PM  

Bedstead Polisher: wax_on: Bedstead Polisher: Prof Jennifer Maggs, lead study author, said: "Parents of socially advantaged children may believe that allowing children to drink will teach them responsible use or may in fact inoculate them against dangerous drinking.
"However, there is little research to support these ideas."

I thought there were lower rates of alcoholism and less binge drinking in countries that allow their children to have small amounts of (sometimes watered down) alcohol with meals? (ie Italy and France.) They remove the taboo and when the kids get older getting blitzed isn't as attractive.

Yes, I thought this was fairly well established.

My kids (2.5 and 4) both went through phases of interest in adult beverages. My older one is over it, my younger one will still snatch the beer bottle from your hand but no longer dips his finger in my bourbon. I suppose when they get older we'll do some other form of that training.

When I was a kid, I would ask for a taste of whatever my dad was drinking and never liked it. The only time I did was when he would put slices of peaches or watermelon into a glass of wine, let it soak and I'd eat the fruit. Classic summer treat.
I just googled this and there are countless recipes for this, but you can just let them soak in whatever red wine you were already drinking for about 20 minutes, no need to add anything fancy.


My mother apparently always got the cherry out of her parents' Manhattans. She grew up to like bourbon. And cherries, for that matter.
 
2017-12-16 12:22:00 PM  
Any children, or any alcohol?
 
2017-12-16 03:15:24 PM  
A great story in our family involves my brother. My parents had a party and didn't clean up. My brother, all of two years old, woke up in the morning and went around drinking what was left in the glasses left out. My mother noticed he was shiatfaced because he kept falling off his tricycle. She fed him donuts and water and well, that's the end of the story. If that happened today I'm sure someone would call an ambulance and child services.
 
2017-12-16 03:39:23 PM  
Is the legal drinking age there still 5? They raised it at some point because 4 was definitely too young.
 
2017-12-16 05:06:03 PM  

cptjeff: My mother apparently always got the cherry out of her parents' Manhattans. She grew up to like bourbon. And cherries, for that matter.


That reminds me, sometimes my grandmother would have candies for me. I'd get so excited then find out they had liquor inside. Sweet things and hard liquor don't always equal joy.
 
2017-12-16 05:40:41 PM  
On a sort of parallel topic...youngest bro Billy Bedlam was working in the triage area of an ED in California when some distraught parents brought in their 5 year old, who for the purposes of this csb I'll call "Joey".

Joey was definitely not right. The parents stated that he had vomited a couple of times, and was moving very slowly, and not talking a lot, but when he did it was slow and one or two words. The NP was gearing up to order everything from CAT scans to lumbar punctures, because Joey was just staring into space and was sorta limp.

Billy looked at him for a minute, started grinning, got down on one knee in front of Joey. "Joey! Look at me, man" Little Joe slowly tracked around until he was looking at Billy. "How are you feeling?" Joey stared at him for a few seconds, then started smiling back with this doofy look and tomato red eyes. "Real.....goood". Billy started laughing his ass off. "He's not altered, he's fried. Look at his eyes. Mom, Dad, do you have edibles around the house?" Turns out Joey had gotten into Mom's stash of Sweetstone Gummy Bears and had smacked down about 100mg of THC.
 
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