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(CNN)   Malls are rotting away to nothingness   ( money.cnn.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Shopping mall, Dow Jones, department stores, malls, American shopping malls, Dow Jones Indices, major department stores, Retailing  
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3067 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Dec 2017 at 2:36 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-12-12 11:05:24 PM  
See what happens when you ban Roy Moore?
 
2017-12-12 11:26:31 PM  
Ours just lost 2 anchor store and the 3rd one might go too. A lot of the shops are leaving for the downtown area or just flat out leaving our area.
 
2017-12-12 11:28:02 PM  
Weak malls are failing. Nearest mall to me is expanding. and has a Sears dead end space to fill..
 
2017-12-12 11:42:05 PM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-12 11:58:10 PM  

sgnilward: See what happens when you ban Roy Moore?


Oh, Goddamn, this post is absolute destruction.  Have it cleaned and returned to my chambers.
 
2017-12-13 12:04:53 AM  
My local mall is turning into a giant medical center with a bowling alley and entertainment complex at one end and a food court at the other.
 
2017-12-13 01:59:11 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: My local mall is turning into a giant medical center with a bowling alley and entertainment complex at one end and a food court at the other.


One here is becoming office space (a call center I think), keeping the food court, ice rink, etc, and renovating the rest to be a "lifestyle center."  They're also I think adding a movie theater, since the one across the street is being torn down to build a few hundred apartments.
 
2017-12-13 02:03:46 AM  
There's one mall around here that I'm not sure how well it's doing, honestly. It seemed not so busy the last couple of times I was there, not to mention that Macy's recently closed along with some other stores.

/Westfield Mission Valley in San Diego, if anyone's curious
//Horton Plaza, on the other hand, is definitely a dying mall.
 
2017-12-13 02:22:53 AM  
I hope that when Roy Moore's favorite mall is turned into a Walmart that he ends up working there as a greeter.
 
2017-12-13 02:38:10 AM  
img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-13 02:38:52 AM  
The existence of things like Yelp is allowing people to pick their spots, making "one-stop shopping" superfluous.  Guys like Roy Moore are going to have to start coming up with excuses to be at a standalone Limited Too
 
2017-12-13 02:40:06 AM  
Well, in the mid '60s, the Tel-12 Mall, right along Telegraph Road at 12 Mile Road. Montgomery Wards on one end, this new K-Mart thing at the other end. Last time I stopped in when visiting the old country, the KMart was a Meijers Thrifty Acres, went there to get some wine for a gift, but don't know about the rest of the mall that yes as a teenager I hung out at.
 
2017-12-13 02:41:57 AM  

fragMasterFlash: I hope that when Roy Moore's favorite mall is turned into a Walmart that he ends up working there as a greeter.


Will they let him wear that asinine cowboy hat?
 
2017-12-13 03:14:22 AM  
It's almost as if ordering things to be delivered directly to the consumer has made storing merchandise locally in large expensive buildings mostly obsolete.
 
2017-12-13 03:23:13 AM  
It all went downhill when malls started kicking out teenagers and businesses that cater to those teenagers (arcades for example) in the early 90s. Forgetting two things, those kids usually come their with their parents' money in hand to act as a cheap babysitter and those kids grow up remembering the place that kicked them out for barely being a nuisance.

On top of that, Vulture Capitalist companies started to do hostile takeovers of some companies (KB Toys for example) that catered to the mall, made loans based on those mall companies' existing credit, then used the loan money to pay off the vulture capitalist company, then abandon the company which eventually goes into bankruptcy and liquidation.

The internet didn't help much either, after a while it became obsolete to many to buy something at a store after seeing it online and able to buy it there. Though there are some (like me) who enjoy going through a physical store and trying on something to make sure it fits before buying it and maybe see something that I didn't think of buying but caught my eye.

I just wish that these mall owners would make a mall a destination again (arcade, movie theater, food court, book store, and other "hang out" spots) for kids today and let their rents be affordable enough that it isn't just the same chain stores in each mall.
 
2017-12-13 03:45:04 AM  

KingRamze: It's almost as if ordering things to be delivered directly to the consumer has made storing merchandise locally in large expensive buildings mostly obsolete.


Except in places where people still have money and like actual shopping. Here in SoCal, there are still great high-end outlets/open-air whatever-they-call-it shopping areas with big stores/and even some good malls...because people still like going out somewhere as an experience, where they can inspect or try on what they are buying, rather than take their chances on internet purchases for everything. For things like clothes and shoes, I hate returning shiat by mail...so I'd rather shop at a brick-and-mortar outlet than gamble online.

The small and mid-box stores and malls in my hometown in Florida, on the other hand, were gutted by the economy (NASA, etc budget cuts, mainly, but also internet sales..like the book stores), so many of those places are often now just sad thrift shops, or closed, or lower-budget crappy restaurants, etc. What used to be a nice grocery store across the street from my old neighborhood went under, then was vacant for 20 years, and is now becoming a branch of a prosperity-gospel church. Yay?
 
2017-12-13 03:45:38 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: It all went downhill when malls started kicking out teenagers and businesses that cater to those teenagers (arcades for example) in the early 90s. Forgetting two things, those kids usually come their with their parents' money in hand to act as a cheap babysitter and those kids grow up remembering the place that kicked them out for barely being a nuisance.

On top of that, Vulture Capitalist companies started to do hostile takeovers of some companies (KB Toys for example) that catered to the mall, made loans based on those mall companies' existing credit, then used the loan money to pay off the vulture capitalist company, then abandon the company which eventually goes into bankruptcy and liquidation.

The internet didn't help much either, after a while it became obsolete to many to buy something at a store after seeing it online and able to buy it there. Though there are some (like me) who enjoy going through a physical store and trying on something to make sure it fits before buying it and maybe see something that I didn't think of buying but caught my eye.

I just wish that these mall owners would make a mall a destination again (arcade, movie theater, food court, book store, and other "hang out" spots) for kids today and let their rents be affordable enough that it isn't just the same chain stores in each mall.


Having just returned from Japan, what was striking to me was the sheer number of small retail stores in shopping streets. These mostly have a roof over head but are open on the ends and when crossing larger streets.

Japan is not richer than the US, but my impression was two thoughts: "this is what it's like in a country with a thriving middle class" and "it must be easy to run a small business here". My thought here in the US is "and you don't have to drive between every shop" - our driving culture has poisoned our society.

The US is a sick country but you don't realize till you leave.
 
2017-12-13 04:01:11 AM  

adamatari: The US is a sick country but you don't realize till you leave.


the corporate news media would prefer it if nobody in our middle class ever figured out just how f*cked we are in this nation.  if we don't know we're boned, we won't complain about it.
 
2017-12-13 04:05:35 AM  

seelorq: Here in SoCal, there are still great high-end outlets/open-air whatever-they-call-it shopping areas...


And by "high-end," I should have stated, "higher-end," i.e, mostly anything above Walmart/Sears quality. But... if you really want to buy discounted designer stuff, there are Neiman Marcus and Saks, etc. outlets for that, too. They have great sales on shoes, by the way.
 
2017-12-13 04:19:34 AM  
My teen years mall has recently changed ownership, but there's one thing I never understood. There was an 8 theater thing in one corner, that closed for a long time and represented a large footprint of unused space. Then Cinemark built a whole new cluster in an unused anchor space. The footprint of that original theater certainly hasn't been filled because that whole row of stores has been flash in the pan little stores, nothing that would reach back to fill those spaces. What's in there? Some secret sex club?
 
2017-12-13 04:42:07 AM  
I'm an Amazon fan, I really dont like crowds but repurposing malls like some are doing seems like a good idea instead of just knocking them down seems like a good idea.
 
2017-12-13 04:49:10 AM  
Obligatory.

Mojo Nixon - Burn Down the Malls
Youtube IAoh_yteKkc
 
2017-12-13 05:25:24 AM  
New Oldsmobiles are in early this year.
 
2017-12-13 05:29:08 AM  

adamatari: Having just returned from Japan, what was striking to me was the sheer number of small retail stores in shopping streets. These mostly have a roof over head but are open on the ends and when crossing larger streets.

Japan is not richer than the US, but my impression was two thoughts: "this is what it's like in a country with a thriving middle class" and "it must be easy to run a small business here". My thought here in the US is "and you don't have to drive between every shop" - our driving culture has poisoned our society.


When I was trying to explain to my wife why I wanted to move back to Japan, this was among my reasons. I love walking around and having places to eat, shop, and explore. Everywhere is accessible by train, bus, and foot, and when you commute this way you find lots of amazing little places doing something great or serving amazing food. A few minutes wandering around any station and watching where people go will give you a great list of restaurants, bars, and shops to visit the next time you find yourself going through that area (or possibly a reason to go back.)

There's plenty of malls here too, though they skew heavily towards ladies apparel and tween fashion, but the food courts are usually awesome and for older dudes like me there's always a few decent dress shirt and tie places with some great styles (businesswear is huge here, obviously).
 
2017-12-13 05:31:34 AM  
Good riddance?

I'm gonna go with Good riddance.
 
2017-12-13 05:31:47 AM  

seelorq: KingRamze: It's almost as if ordering things to be delivered directly to the consumer has made storing merchandise locally in large expensive buildings mostly obsolete.

Except in places where people still have money and like actual shopping. Here in SoCal, there are still great high-end outlets/open-air whatever-they-call-it shopping areas with big stores/and even some good malls...because people still like going out somewhere as an experience, where they can inspect or try on what they are buying, rather than take their chances on internet purchases for everything. For things like clothes and shoes, I hate returning shiat by mail...so I'd rather shop at a brick-and-mortar outlet than gamble online.

The small and mid-box stores and malls in my hometown in Florida, on the other hand, were gutted by the economy (NASA, etc budget cuts, mainly, but also internet sales..like the book stores), so many of those places are often now just sad thrift shops, or closed, or lower-budget crappy restaurants, etc. What used to be a nice grocery store across the street from my old neighborhood went under, then was vacant for 20 years, and is now becoming a branch of a prosperity-gospel church. Yay?


I enjoy the occasional mall browse myself -- once every few years.  Last visit was to a Best Buy to help someone buy a few gadgets they weren't interested in waiting for Amazon Prime delivery for at a lower price.   Surprisingly, even my female friends tend to buy clothes online -- they not only know their sizes, but have apps to help them & the services they use allow them to buy multiple sizes of the same item and return the ones that don't fit.... in the same box they came in -- for free.  (apparently they worked the cost of the returns into the price of the delivery and it was still cheaper than paying store rent, A/C, and sales rep salaries)

Myrtle Beach has some amazing outlets and outdoor malls that have local music and entertainment... but indoor malls most everywhere else in SC are largely dead.   The typical mall has a JC Penney, Belk, and Sears which largely sell women's clothing, lots more women's clothing stores, a few shoe stores and jewelry stores, a Best Buy, and maybe a Bath and Body Works with a Bed Bath and Beyond nearby... plus a food court.   I used to visit malls all the time when they had theaters in them and arcades.  These days, I am much more likely to visit a hardware store than the mall.... or a separate movie theater or restaurant.

Sears is dead, JC Penney is hanging by a thread, Belk isn't doing much better.   They simply can't afford the rent on their stores anymore because there's no foot traffic.   Sears is largely being replaced by dollar stores.   A 2-story mall I visited regularly in Knoxville, TN because I lived nearby had almost the entire lower floor vacant.   Even a huge mall in Raleigh, NC I frequented -- mostly for the shopping experience b/c it was close by and had a nice restaurant or two in it -- was showing signs of closing down.

The last 6 pairs of shoes I purchased were from Amazon... because I know my size & what I wanted.

Visiting the mall these days is more like visiting a museum -- someplace I go to look for fun sometimes or just to get out and do something different, but don't really buy anything.
 
2017-12-13 05:46:17 AM  
Well it will keep Dan Bell and dead malls in business. He has been to a lot of places I have been to.
 
2017-12-13 06:56:37 AM  

Gordon Bennett: Obligatory.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/IAoh_yte​Kkc]



Mojo is everywhere, man.

excepting Joan Rivers,  these days
 
2017-12-13 07:00:15 AM  
"When Starbucks (SBUXannounced that it was closing its Teavana tea line and wanted to shutter all of its stores, mall operator Simon Property Group (SPG) countered with a lawsuit. Simon cited in part the effect the store closures might have on other mall tenants.
Earlier this month, a judge upheld Simons' suit, ordering Teavana to keep 77 of its stores open."

How the hell does this happen?
 
2017-12-13 07:29:16 AM  
And nothing of value was lost.

People used to frequent malls bc there wasn't much else to do in suburban America. Now, people just have better options on what to do with their time.
 
2017-12-13 07:29:32 AM  

seelorq: KingRamze: It's almost as if ordering things to be delivered directly to the consumer has made storing merchandise locally in large expensive buildings mostly obsolete.

Except in places where people still have money and like actual shopping. Here in SoCal, there are still great high-end outlets/open-air whatever-they-call-it shopping areas with big stores/and even some good malls...because people still like going out somewhere as an experience, where they can inspect or try on what they are buying, rather than take their chances on internet purchases for everything. For things like clothes and shoes, I hate returning shiat by mail...so I'd rather shop at a brick-and-mortar outlet than gamble online.

The small and mid-box stores and malls in my hometown in Florida, on the other hand, were gutted by the economy (NASA, etc budget cuts, mainly, but also internet sales..like the book stores), so many of those places are often now just sad thrift shops, or closed, or lower-budget crappy restaurants, etc. What used to be a nice grocery store across the street from my old neighborhood went under, then was vacant for 20 years, and is now becoming a branch of a prosperity-gospel church. Yay?


The old Kash n Karry in Ocala?
 
2017-12-13 07:48:05 AM  
Not everyone is pessimistic about malls.  The Surrender-Monkeys just bought a bunch of high-end malls in the US.  I'm looking forward to a proper cheese shop at the local mall, unlike the current cheese shop, which seems to be uncontaminated by cheese.

http://www.northjersey.com/story/mone​y​/2017/12/12/garden-state-plaza-get-new​-european-owner-under-westfield-sale-d​eal/943494001/
 
2017-12-13 07:54:51 AM  

Weaver95: adamatari: The US is a sick country but you don't realize till you leave.

the corporate news media would prefer it if nobody in our middle class ever figured out just how f*cked we are in this nation.  if we don't know we're boned, we won't complain about it.


Japan's economy is fettered by a large number of regulations which create great inefficiencies in the economy. It's largely sheltered from foreign competition and Japanese consumers are gouged all the time. It's why they have such a big deflation problem and the economic has been stagnant for decades.
 
2017-12-13 07:58:19 AM  

DarkSoulNoHope: It all went downhill when malls started kicking out teenagers and businesses that cater to those teenagers (arcades for example) in the early 90s. Forgetting two things, those kids usually come their with their parents' money in hand to act as a cheap babysitter and those kids grow up remembering the place that kicked them out for barely being a nuisance.

On top of that, Vulture Capitalist companies started to do hostile takeovers of some companies (KB Toys for example) that catered to the mall, made loans based on those mall companies' existing credit, then used the loan money to pay off the vulture capitalist company, then abandon the company which eventually goes into bankruptcy and liquidation.

The internet didn't help much either, after a while it became obsolete to many to buy something at a store after seeing it online and able to buy it there. Though there are some (like me) who enjoy going through a physical store and trying on something to make sure it fits before buying it and maybe see something that I didn't think of buying but caught my eye.

I just wish that these mall owners would make a mall a destination again (arcade, movie theater, food court, book store, and other "hang out" spots) for kids today and let their rents be affordable enough that it isn't just the same chain stores in each mall.


Mall culture is alive and well in Beijing. One local mall has four floors of restaurants and a Tesla dealership. Another has a 3d gaming arcade across the hall from a high-end supermarket (wonder if there's a connection there?). One entire building is given over to children's stuff -- with its own McDonald's, a baby spa (don't ask), an ice rink, and every kid store you can think of. Entire families come to Solana and spend the day.
 
2017-12-13 07:58:44 AM  
I'm the first?

Fark, I am disappoint.

http://www.deadmalls.com/stories.html​
 
2017-12-13 08:00:19 AM  
The mall here is doing ok.  A few vacancies in the dead spots.  Sears is hanging on by its fingernails.  It's been very busy this month.

To me the "anchor" stores are now truly that.  Weighing the mall down.  Ms Nob and I rarely shop at them.  Mostly go to the mall for the specialty shops.
 
2017-12-13 08:07:30 AM  
I wonder what Margie Ortiz would think.

True Stories Mall Scene
Youtube 4cYYPpZ8rFI
 
2017-12-13 08:15:42 AM  
My city bought our ghost mall. They keep making noises about moving different government agencies into it, but so far, the only two to open are a branch of the VA and the elections office. Personally, I'd love the city to donate a big chunk of the space to the local food bank/homeless shelter, as they currently operate out of a very small building.

The latest plan is to house an entrepreneur kickstarter there, with a makerspace, various how-to lectures, and SBA assistance. I think that's a cool experiment, and I hope they'll use the opportunity to start leveraging our city's fiber internet service on a larger scale. I'm looking forward to the first meeting in February.

I think that as the population ages, more cities will turn abandoned malls into assisted living facilities, with residences on one end, medical services on the other, and retail/food in the middle for family and other visitors.
 
2017-12-13 08:20:57 AM  

AlanMooresBeard: "When Starbucks (SBUX) announced that it was closing its Teavana tea line and wanted to shutter all of its stores, mall operator Simon Property Group (SPG) countered with a lawsuit. Simon cited in part the effect the store closures might have on other mall tenants.
Earlier this month, a judge upheld Simons' suit, ordering Teavana to keep 77 of its stores open."

How the hell does this happen?


I hate Starbucks as much as anyone but yeah, good question.
 
2017-12-13 08:25:50 AM  
Robin Sparkles-Let's Go To The Mall' (full version).
Youtube IY_bhVSGKEg
 
2017-12-13 08:38:23 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: My local mall is turning into a giant medical center with a bowling alley and entertainment complex at one end and a food court at the other.


There's a precedent for that.
 
2017-12-13 08:40:58 AM  

sno man: Weak malls are failing. Nearest mall to me is expanding. and has a Sears dead end space to fill..


Ours lost Sears and it is unknown what will happen to the JC Penny's here, but we did just cram a new Dick's into an empty slot, so we have that going for us...
 
2017-12-13 09:10:38 AM  

rummonkey: sno man: Weak malls are failing. Nearest mall to me is expanding. and has a Sears dead end space to fill..

Ours lost Sears and it is unknown what will happen to the JC Penny's here, but we did just cram a new Dick's into an empty slot, so we have that going for us...


PHRASING
 
2017-12-13 09:13:33 AM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: New Oldsmobiles are in early this year.


It's a shame that Disco Pants and Haircuts had to close, though...
 
2017-12-13 09:16:33 AM  

John Buck 41: AlanMooresBeard: "When Starbucks (SBUX) announced that it was closing its Teavana tea line and wanted to shutter all of its stores, mall operator Simon Property Group (SPG) countered with a lawsuit. Simon cited in part the effect the store closures might have on other mall tenants.
Earlier this month, a judge upheld Simons' suit, ordering Teavana to keep 77 of its stores open."

How the hell does this happen?

I hate Starbucks as much as anyone but yeah, good question.


I am guessing the judge said Starbucks can't skip out on the lease.
 
2017-12-13 09:16:42 AM  

Krieghund: [img.fark.net image 468x400][View Full Size image _x_]


LOL... I was about to post that the one I went to as a kid is completely empty, but the one that was built when I was a teenager is flourishing. (And yes, I am a white people.)

Sounds like some of the malls here are handling the conversion properly, I've always thought malls should offer more than just shopping. They could easily be entertainment centers especially in places with crappy climates like mine. The mall near me that's still successful has an indoor go-cart track in addition to a bunch of restaurants (not a food court, actual sit-down restaurants like Cheesecake Factory, a Fondu place and a Brazillian Steak house among others. (Of course, they also get tons of Canadian shoppers taking advantage of exchange rates and tax differences...)
 
2017-12-13 09:16:45 AM  

FlyingLizardOfDoom: rummonkey: sno man: Weak malls are failing. Nearest mall to me is expanding. and has a Sears dead end space to fill..

Ours lost Sears and it is unknown what will happen to the JC Penny's here, but we did just cram a new Dick's into an empty slot, so we have that going for us...

PHRASING


img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-13 09:49:15 AM  
Here for the Mojo Nixon reference.

Leaving satisfied.
 
2017-12-13 09:57:44 AM  
No pictures? Rotting malls ARE my fetish.

/F U fark IS my personal fetish site
 
2017-12-13 10:15:10 AM  

668NeighborOfTheBeast: No pictures? Rotting malls ARE my fetish.

/F U fark IS my personal fetish site


Does this do it for you?

img.fark.netView Full Size


Randall Park Mall near where I live. I was a fantastic upscale mall that lived in an urban area that Reagan nuked in the 80s and never recovered.
 
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