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(USA Today)   Psst...hey, buddy. You're having a heart attack   ( usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Apple Watch, FDA approval process, Heart, blood pressure, Apple Watch app, irregular heart rhythms, Pulse, Valley startup AliveCor  
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3770 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Dec 2017 at 11:50 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2017-12-07 11:43:25 AM  
This will certainly come in handy.
 
2017-12-07 12:43:10 PM  
Fingertips 19 - Heart Attack
Youtube D6NyC2NJFYM
 
2017-12-07 12:43:49 PM  
If it can also serve as my "O" dealer, sign me up.

img.fark.netView Full Size
 
2017-12-07 12:58:35 PM  
So now every time I go to the ER it will be filled with late 30s marketing managers who insist that they be seen first because their iMonitor is telling them they are about to die.
 
2017-12-07 12:59:40 PM  
This is cool.
 
Oak
2017-12-07 01:08:05 PM  
Queen - Sheer Heart Attack
Youtube ESJ3iH9i04Q
 
2017-12-07 01:17:22 PM  
"ack ack ack, you oughta know by now."
 
2017-12-07 01:19:38 PM  
Can't wait until someone's "wellness" program wants access to your fitness tracker. "That guy's having a heart attack. Cancel his insurance and/or post his job opening."
 
2017-12-07 01:36:44 PM  
I can see why they wouldn't use shocks and loud noises to alert people.
 
2017-12-07 01:43:28 PM  

Chevello: So now every time I go to the ER it will be filled with late 30s marketing managers who insist that they be seen first because their iMonitor is telling them they are about to die.


Interestingly enough, a department chairman at Cook County Hospital in Chicago found a way to diagnose just these types of patients.  In the 90's the hospital was getting a large number of patients, on average thirty a day, coming into the ED who thought they were having a heart attack.  Trouble is, something like anxiety or asthma can feel an awful lot like a heart attack, and they were struggling to find a way to rule out very very quickly who had unrelated symptoms and who was really in need of attention. (It's more inconclusive than it you'd think, and a definitive enzyme test can take hours.)

The chairman dude enlisted the help of a cardiologist to design an algorithm and a decision tree based on the most common risk factors.  The algorithm turned out to be a whopping 70 percent more accurate than the old method, and the doctors employing the new method averaged about 75 to 89 percent accuracy compared to their standard diagnosis protocol.

What does this have to do with anything?  I guess not much, but I found it interesting.

Also, math is awesome.
 
2017-12-07 02:09:38 PM  
Teddybears 'Cardiac Arrest' feat Robyn [Audio]
Youtube cZUiMixMMz0
 
2017-12-07 02:23:43 PM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: Chevello: So now every time I go to the ER it will be filled with late 30s marketing managers who insist that they be seen first because their iMonitor is telling them they are about to die.

Interestingly enough, a department chairman at Cook County Hospital in Chicago found a way to diagnose just these types of patients.  In the 90's the hospital was getting a large number of patients, on average thirty a day, coming into the ED who thought they were having a heart attack.  Trouble is, something like anxiety or asthma can feel an awful lot like a heart attack, and they were struggling to find a way to rule out very very quickly who had unrelated symptoms and who was really in need of attention. (It's more inconclusive than it you'd think, and a definitive enzyme test can take hours.)

The chairman dude enlisted the help of a cardiologist to design an algorithm and a decision tree based on the most common risk factors.  The algorithm turned out to be a whopping 70 percent more accurate than the old method, and the doctors employing the new method averaged about 75 to 89 percent accuracy compared to their standard diagnosis protocol.

What does this have to do with anything?  I guess not much, but I found it interesting.

Also, math is awesome.


That is pretty cool. I often wonder if I'll realize it's happening when I have mine.
 
2017-12-07 02:51:03 PM  

Chevello: PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: Chevello: So now every time I go to the ER it will be filled with late 30s marketing managers who insist that they be seen first because their iMonitor is telling them they are about to die.

Interestingly enough, a department chairman at Cook County Hospital in Chicago found a way to diagnose just these types of patients.  In the 90's the hospital was getting a large number of patients, on average thirty a day, coming into the ED who thought they were having a heart attack.  Trouble is, something like anxiety or asthma can feel an awful lot like a heart attack, and they were struggling to find a way to rule out very very quickly who had unrelated symptoms and who was really in need of attention. (It's more inconclusive than it you'd think, and a definitive enzyme test can take hours.)

The chairman dude enlisted the help of a cardiologist to design an algorithm and a decision tree based on the most common risk factors.  The algorithm turned out to be a whopping 70 percent more accurate than the old method, and the doctors employing the new method averaged about 75 to 89 percent accuracy compared to their standard diagnosis protocol.

What does this have to do with anything?  I guess not much, but I found it interesting.

Also, math is awesome.

That is pretty cool. I often wonder if I'll realize it's happening when I have mine.


http://www.seilevel.com/requirements/​v​isual-models-save-lives-how-a-decision​-tree-revolutionized-heart-attack-diag​nosis-2

First read about it in the book Blink.  Interesting stuff in there.  The reason for this anecdote being in the book is that the book is all about how we often take in and process information in seconds or less, and that in the case above, sometimes less information is better than more information.  A doctor often has to make those kinds of quick decisions.

One of my favorite examples from the book is David Sibley, a renowned bird expert.  He once spotted a rare bird in flight from two hundred yards away or so and intuitively knew what it was.  I'm a birder myself, and I can't tell you how long I've stared at a bunch of waterfowl puttering around on a lake and still had no farking clue what they were.  Granted, my binoculars are shiate for seeing that far, but my guess is Sibley would know them from where I sit.  Practice and study, of course, but a lot of bird ID is dependent on split-second intuition because sometimes that's about how long you get after you spot them before the little farkers fly off.

It's an interesting book.

Aneeeeeway...oh yeah.  Was supposed to be working.  Rambling over.
 
2017-12-07 03:47:47 PM  

OccamsWhiskers: If it can also serve as my "O" dealer, sign me up.

[img.fark.net image 850x679][View Full Size image _x_]


"A heart attack?! What do I want with a heart attack?!"

"Shhhhhh! Not so loud!"
 
2017-12-07 04:02:54 PM  
A new generation of apps and wearables is emerging with the ability to monitor vital signs crucial to spotting heart problems, giving us and our doctors powerful new weapons to fight stroke and heart disease.

These things tend to not be powerful new weapons but rather they tend to be giant piles of data that could be anywhere from completely useless to sheer gold and we have no idea, so your doctor will most likely ignore it.  They sure as fark aren't going to take the time to sit there and look and analyze all of your data.
 
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