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(Fark)   Doc just put me on Zoloft. Pick up the prescription this afternoon. Never been on anything like this, what can I expect? (I'd throw this up in TF Advice, but I like Fark Snark with my morning coffee too much)   ( fark.com) divider line
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216 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 22 Nov 2017 at 12:20 PM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2017-11-22 10:21:20 AM  
The side effects can be mixed.

If you try to wear your prolapsed anus as a hat, seek medical attention ASAP.
 
2017-11-22 10:28:04 AM  
I'm sort of in the same boat with fluoxetine. Best of results to you, subs.
 
2017-11-22 10:40:10 AM  
My experience when I started fluoxetine was this:
1-3 weeks: nothing
4-5 weeks: crazy dreams and mood swings
6+ weeks: like the sun had finally come out
 
2017-11-22 10:49:39 AM  
Keeping in mind that experiences can vary wildly from person to person...

I was on Zoloft for around 10 years, having been prescribed it as a means of controlling a pretty crippling 'generalized anxiety disorder;' not traditional agoraphobia (ie afraid to leave the house), but rather that my panic would start to rise rapidly in any situation where I wasn't in total control. So, being stuck in traffic, knowing that someone else was occupying the only washroom, being a passenger when someone else was driving, etc etc etc.

Zoloft helped. It didn't eradicate the symptoms - getting yourself back in control is an effort you have to consciously undertake - but it absolutely did help. Maybe the best way I can describe it is that it 'takes the edge off.' You can still feel your anxiety rising, but it's just bubbling, not boiling over. Don't go in expecting a cure. It's not a solution in and of itself, it's a crutch to help you get there yourself.

The bad news: that 'taking the edge off' isn't just your anxiety, it's every aspect of your reaction to the world. If you're not conscious of it, your relationships may suffer because you feel more emotionally distant (as if all your feelings have some padding around them). You may find yourself not caring so much about other people's opinions or if you're doing your job well; it's 'I don't give a shiat' on a level all its own. And the lousiest part of it is that it killed most of my sex drive for a good chunk my 20s.

I don't mean to try to scare you off of it or anything - like I said, it doeshelp. You just need to make sure you go in with your eyes open, that there are negative consequences even as you're enjoying the benefits.


Oh, and one last thing: once you've been on it for a while, you'll need to taper off if you want to quit as it's really not something that you should go off cold turkey. I did, and the mood swings I experienced were like nothing I've ever experienced before. In the blink of an eye I could swing from crushing despair to 'I want to fark everyone in this room right this instant' to 'how dare that biatch tell me to slow down, I will farking murder her with my bare hands, on her lawn in front of her child.' It's wild, and not in a good way. When your doctor says wean, wean.
 
2017-11-22 10:53:46 AM  
Don't skip any bloodwork that your doctor wants done. That's how livers go wonky. FAST.
 
2017-11-22 11:21:12 AM  
I took a Zoloft, once.

The experience was like NeedlesslyCanadian says, it took the edge off my reactions to everything. I felt as though the floor rose, and the ceiling came down. There was very little emotional room available. I wasn't happy, couldn't feel happy, wasn't sad, couldn't feel sad. It was just kind of there.

And this was just taking the pill once, on a whim.
 
2017-11-22 12:29:49 PM  
Well, you might be nauseous, vomiting, impotent, lose your hair, get constipated, lose your appetite and lose a dangerous amount of weight, and have extreme bouts of insomnia but at least you'll be happy!!!!!
 
2017-11-22 12:31:00 PM  
I've taken it before and my impression has been that of:
Person: Hey what are you so happy about?
Me: Umm I'm not happy, i'm actually kinda pissed off right now
Person: But you're smiling so much you look happy!
Me: Trust me I'm not...

Sure it forced a more approachable look on me but I felt it was to fake for my taste.  I've had better success with other antidepressants.
 
2017-11-22 12:35:59 PM  
Say good bye to your libido.

And do not simply go off it cold turkey.  You can crash pretty bad when drastically changing your serotonin levels.

Have you gotten other opinions from other doctors before going on this? How long have you been working with this doctor before he prescribed it?

What are you expecting this drug to do?

How long do you/your doctor expect you to be on this medication?

Did your doctor explain the side effects of this medication to you?

Fark is probably the last place you want to get advice from.
 
2017-11-22 12:39:09 PM  
I had stomach issues when I first started taking it.  Horrible diarrhea and a burning in my stomach and just kind of felt emotionally numb for a while but that all passed.  I did forget to bring it on vacation with me once and just felt nauseated the whole time (not fun when you're on boats in the Keys).

The sexual side effects were kind of fun at first but got old after a while.
 
2017-11-22 12:42:20 PM  
 
2017-11-22 12:44:42 PM  
Have you tried therapy and talking to someone about your issues? Or is that not an option for you, and pills are a better solution? Is it a matter of what your insurance will provide?

I am just curious what steps your medical provider suggested for you besides taking a pill first, if there was anything else first. And did you have a physical to determine if there could be a physical cause for what is going on?
 
2017-11-22 12:47:24 PM  
Enjoy the pretty colors.
 
2017-11-22 12:47:38 PM  
Don't drink the kool-aid. Instead, go to www.m-w.com, and behold the definition of serotonin. Not just a neurotransmitter - "powerful vasoconstrictor" - building this chemical up in your brain starves the brain of oxygen; the parts of your brain responsible for will to live, self-control/preservation can - that's can - shut down entirely, and you will never know it. If you have access to guns and/or knives if/when this shutdown of brain mechanisms occurs, you will - that's will - hurt yourself and/or others. And if you don't, you'll be thinking about it, because the brain mechanisms that keep you from thinking about it are starved of oxygen.

Demand biological basis (not just debunked theories) in medicine, and accept nothing less.

Oh, and dickpunch that doctor. He deserves it.
 
2017-11-22 12:50:31 PM  
Basically, WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T TAKE IT.
 
2017-11-22 12:50:48 PM  
little to nothing. Others around you may notice changes more than you do. Of course that was just me. First couple days of prozac were a buzz, and had I not known what a buzz was I would have felt uncomfortable. Other stuff had varying degrees of mild side effects.

side effects vary from person to person, if you get any at all. Your best bet is to read the literature or talk to the pharmacist
 
2017-11-22 12:52:04 PM  

NeedlesslyCanadian: Zoloft helped. It didn't eradicate the symptoms - getting yourself back in control is an effort you have to consciously undertake - but it absolutely did help. Maybe the best way I can describe it is that it 'takes the edge off.' You can still feel your anxiety rising, but it's just bubbling, not boiling over. Don't go in expecting a cure. It's not a solution in and of itself, it's a crutch to help you get there yourself.


It's somewhat the same with Wellbutrin and me. (Not a SSRI, but used for many of the same issues)  It doesn't really change anything specific, but it makes it possible to let go of bad thoughts rather than dwelling on them.  The problems are still there, you still get upset or depressed when bad stuff happens, but it's not still there in your head weeks later crowding out what's going on right then as well.

For all psych drugs, don't expect instant changes, don't expect it to fix everything.  Monitor your side effects and don't hesitate to go back to the doc if the dose isn't right or the side effects are worse than the benefits.  Everyone reacts to these differently.
 
2017-11-22 12:52:33 PM  

Danger Mouse: Fark is probably the last place you want to get advice from.


this a million times.

The derp is already strong in this thread
 
2017-11-22 12:53:56 PM  
www.m-w.com isn't lying to you (if you don't believe me)

Hell, if you don't believe me, ask Phil & Brynn Hartman.
 
2017-11-22 12:54:50 PM  
and it may sound trite, but prior to the doctoring prescribing medication, did your therapy include a complete evaluation of your diet and include physical exercise?  Do you drink or take any recreational drugs?
 
2017-11-22 12:58:09 PM  
I disagree cretinbob, dangermouse; Fark is a great place to get advice, unless you can't tell shiat from shinola, and critically think for yourself (then it's a horrible place to get advice)
 
2017-11-22 12:59:25 PM  
A girl I had started dating, took Zoloft, drank some wine, wrecked her SUV and was put in a mental hospital. I have no idea which of those was the cause/ effect, but I would strongly caution someone against dating me, taking Zoloft, drinking wine and crashing their SUV cause they might end up in the nuthouse.
 
2017-11-22 01:03:06 PM  
I tried Zoloft and, while my depression was more under control, Mr. Happy was no longer happy. He just wouldn't rise to the occasion very well and, when he did, things would take so long that I swear my wife was reaching for the TV remote. I switched to Wellbutrin and those effects went away, plus it helped me quit smoking.

No matter what you choose, though, pay heed to what everyone has said about going cold turkey.
 
2017-11-22 01:04:12 PM  
No matter what you choose, though, pay heed to what everyone has said about going cold turkey.

^ THIS
 
2017-11-22 01:05:49 PM  
your never ever getting off of it.
 
2017-11-22 01:07:57 PM  

hooneybayer: I disagree cretinbob, dangermouse; Fark is a great place to get advice, unless you can't tell shiat from shinola, and critically think for yourself (then it's a horrible place to get advice)


advice on how to get your nuts unstuck from a slatted chair or what to put in your ramen, yeah. This, not so much. Ut's fishing for what one wants to hear so they can justify their own actions, one way or the other. It's not really healthy.
 
2017-11-22 01:11:17 PM  

hooneybayer: I disagree cretinbob, dangermouse; Fark is a great place to get advice, unless you can't tell shiat from shinola, and critically think for yourself (then it's a horrible place to get advice)


because getting advice from a stranger on the internet, rather than in person with a medical professional who is familiar with your personal history is much better.

As someone who has 20 + years in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically in SSRI's I have significant concerns with reuptake inhibitors, including palette dysfunction as well as seizures.  I have a concern if the subject is receiving any MOA inhibitors.  There's  complete foundation that needs to be established and evaluated.  I could offer some significant input for the OP but would we need to have a much better understanding before offering any other advice than "You really should talk to your doctor".
 
2017-11-22 01:12:49 PM  
I have depression. Tried Prozac briefly and it upset my stomach too much. Took Zoloft for many years and it was good. Definitely helped with the depression. Mild side effects at the beginning were completely tolerable. Very mild side effects while taking it were also tolerable. For random reasons switched to Celexa some years ago and it is better with the depression. Similar mild side effects. Tried St. John's Wort and it had an effect, but it wasn't steady so the depression kept coming and going. I assume that's because who knows what the hell was really in each pill. Therapy helped with some of the disordered thinking and behaviors from being depressed. Will probably be on anti-depressants forever, similar to someone with a missing limb will have a prosthesis forever.

My main recommendation would be to try another drug until one works, and also to try some therapy along with it. Good luck and remember it gets better.
 
2017-11-22 01:13:54 PM  

hooneybayer: Don't drink the kool-aid. Instead, go to www.m-w.com, and behold the definition of serotonin. Not just a neurotransmitter - "powerful vasoconstrictor" - building this chemical up in your brain starves the brain of oxygen; the parts of your brain responsible for will to live, self-control/preservation can - that's can - shut down entirely, and you will never know it. If you have access to guns and/or knives if/when this shutdown of brain mechanisms occurs, you will - that's will - hurt yourself and/or others. And if you don't, you'll be thinking about it, because the brain mechanisms that keep you from thinking about it are starved of oxygen.

Demand biological basis (not just debunked theories) in medicine, and accept nothing less.

Oh, and dickpunch that doctor. He deserves it.


Dickpunch yourself.  ~12% of all Americans are on SSRIs.  You claim everyone on SSRIs will hurt themselves or someone else.  Bullshiat.  Utter bollocks, and trivially disprovable.

On, on a more serious note, I teach a class in controversial scientific theories.  The final project is to defend one, and two years back someone did "SSRIs increase the risk of suicide"  Each group has a counter-group who's job it is to disprove the theory

Both groups did fantastic jobs, bringing in a lot of high-quality, peer reviewed studies out of primary literature.  End result?  Nobody really knows- it's possible there's some effect, but there are so many confounding factors it's virtually impossible to actually know.

For example, here's a study of 226 thousand veterans.  Suicide rates for people on SSRI antidepressants were 1/3 that of folks without them.
On the flip side, here's a study of 392k Danish children that does show a link, at least for the first few months after the first dose.

Which is correct?  Perhaps both, or neither?  Either way, your claim that "you will - that's will - hurt yourself and/or others" is utter, complete garbage.

Should you be careful when taking powerful, mind-altering drugs?  Absolutely.  Should you listen to people on the internet pushing bullshiat?  No.
 
2017-11-22 01:16:13 PM  
Its awesome. Works for me at 50 mg. went off it once tried a bunch of other meds. now back on it none of them worked. Anxiety issues for me. Sexual stuff goes away after a month or so. Stomach pain at first lasts for a few days. Dreams are crazy.
 
2017-11-22 01:18:50 PM  

NeedlesslyCanadian: Keeping in mind that experiences can vary wildly from person to person...

I was on Zoloft for around 10 years, having been prescribed it as a means of controlling a pretty crippling 'generalized anxiety disorder;' not traditional agoraphobia (ie afraid to leave the house), but rather that my panic would start to rise rapidly in any situation where I wasn't in total control. So, being stuck in traffic, knowing that someone else was occupying the only washroom, being a passenger when someone else was driving, etc etc etc.

Zoloft helped. It didn't eradicate the symptoms - getting yourself back in control is an effort you have to consciously undertake - but it absolutely did help. Maybe the best way I can describe it is that it 'takes the edge off.' You can still feel your anxiety rising, but it's just bubbling, not boiling over. Don't go in expecting a cure. It's not a solution in and of itself, it's a crutch to help you get there yourself.

The bad news: that 'taking the edge off' isn't just your anxiety, it's every aspect of your reaction to the world. If you're not conscious of it, your relationships may suffer because you feel more emotionally distant (as if all your feelings have some padding around them). You may find yourself not caring so much about other people's opinions or if you're doing your job well; it's 'I don't give a shiat' on a level all its own. And the lousiest part of it is that it killed most of my sex drive for a good chunk my 20s.

I don't mean to try to scare you off of it or anything - like I said, it doeshelp. You just need to make sure you go in with your eyes open, that there are negative consequences even as you're enjoying the benefits.


Oh, and one last thing: once you've been on it for a while, you'll need to taper off if you want to quit as it's really not something that you should go off cold turkey. I did, and the mood swings I experienced were like nothing I've ever experienced before. In the blink of an eye I could swing from c ...


Beginning in 2005 I was on Zoloft for around two years, and what you wrote mirrors a lot of what I experienced.  I was going through the collapse of a bad marriage and finally tackled my depression and some other demons.  I felt fortunate in that Zoloft provided what I needed at the time, which was mainly something to I guess numb me a bit while I dealt with life, rediscover myself, and did other things like attend weekly therapy sessions and a support group.

I used to describe the numbness as 'looking through a vaseline-covered lens'.  Everything just felt dulled and blurred.  No emotional highs nor lows.  Just right there in the middle.  But considering my life situation at the time, that's what I desperately needed.

I went cold turkey in 2007, which was a huge mistake.  What I remember most were the 'brain zaps'.  I'd be sitting there and it literally felt like parts of my brain had a static electric charge go off.  I also felt like crap for around 2-3 weeks.
 
2017-11-22 01:30:39 PM  
Have you tried shrooms, subby?

:P
 
2017-11-22 01:37:25 PM  
Your dick's gonna fall off.  If you're a chick, you grow a dick and then it falls off.
 
2017-11-22 01:42:30 PM  
Zoloft has a numbing effect, as others have described. Numb emotions may be a blessing if you've been too raw or stressed or anxious, but staying like that forever isn't ideal either. Numb genitals aren't much fun either.

I tapered off slowly (over about a 6-week span) and even then I had random dizzy spells for a few months. Thankfully they were always very brief and didn't include nausea.
 
2017-11-22 01:49:11 PM  
Has the OP tried Apathy? It's free, with almost no side effects.
 
2017-11-22 01:54:26 PM  
first i was on paxil. not very effective.
now I'm on lexapro, quite effective.
in between i was on zoloft only briefly b/c it made me weep and fear for my stability.
but every SSRI works differently on different people, and i hope this works for you subby.

i, at least, never had a diminution in libido on any of those medications nor do i feel emotionally dulled. i no longer have the paralyzing episodes that left me under the blankets in a fetal position for 36 hours, but that's the result i wanted.
 
2017-11-22 01:58:29 PM  

Roja Herring: The sexual side effects were kind of fun at first but got old after a while.


Go on
 
2017-11-22 02:06:34 PM  
I'm on generic Zoloft (sertraline).  It has helped some and the side effects have been minimal.  The muting of the sexual aspects are the most acute, but now I basically just match my wife instead of being a quick-draw rabbit who wants it 24/7, so we are good there.

My one piece of advice is to take the pill in the morning.  I started at night and it messed with my sleep.  Once I swapped it got better.
 
2017-11-22 02:11:18 PM  

Fallout Zone: I'm on generic Zoloft (sertraline).  It has helped some and the side effects have been minimal.  The muting of the sexual aspects are the most acute, but now I basically just match my wife instead of being a quick-draw rabbit who wants it 24/7, so we are good there.

My one piece of advice is to take the pill in the morning.  I started at night and it messed with my sleep.  Once I swapped it got better.


I should add, I do not have any of the emotional side effects.  I don't feel like my mood is different or muted or anything.  Where I've seen the benefit is in the "anticipatory anxiety", where I am a bit more calm when waiting for stressful events.  If I have something I know is going to trigger my anxiety big time, I'll take a propanolol which slows the heart rate.

It may matter on whether you are taking it for depression or anxiety.  I don't have a problem with depression, but have a solid case of generalized anxiety.
 
2017-11-22 02:11:53 PM  

Danger Mouse: hooneybayer: I disagree cretinbob, dangermouse; Fark is a great place to get advice, unless you can't tell shiat from shinola, and critically think for yourself (then it's a horrible place to get advice)

because getting advice from a stranger on the internet, rather than in person with a medical professional who is familiar with your personal history is much better.

As someone who has 20 + years in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically in SSRI's I have significant concerns with reuptake inhibitors, including palette dysfunction as well as seizures.  I have a concern if the subject is receiving any MOA inhibitors.  There's  complete foundation that needs to be established and evaluated.  I could offer some significant input for the OP but would we need to have a much better understanding before offering any other advice than "You really should talk to your doctor".


Can you please elaborate? I know someone on ssri meds that snores like a bear. Is it the meds?
 
2017-11-22 02:18:14 PM  

Schlubbe: Danger Mouse: hooneybayer: I disagree cretinbob, dangermouse; Fark is a great place to get advice, unless you can't tell shiat from shinola, and critically think for yourself (then it's a horrible place to get advice)

because getting advice from a stranger on the internet, rather than in person with a medical professional who is familiar with your personal history is much better.

As someone who has 20 + years in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically in SSRI's I have significant concerns with reuptake inhibitors, including palette dysfunction as well as seizures.  I have a concern if the subject is receiving any MOA inhibitors.  There's  complete foundation that needs to be established and evaluated.  I could offer some significant input for the OP but would we need to have a much better understanding before offering any other advice than "You really should talk to your doctor".

Can you please elaborate? I know someone on ssri meds that snores like a bear. Is it the meds?


I'm actually full of shiat and don't know what I am talking about.
this is why you don't take life changing advice from people on Fark.

And yes, Snoring is a side effect of Zoloft.
 
2017-11-22 02:31:24 PM  
Granted, I have weird reactions to OTC meds.  But when I took it, it didn't last long.  Other than feeling completely removed from reality, my problem was that I lost my "minds eye"   For example, I can easily picture the grade school I went to, the way the front doors looked, the office when you first walked in, etc.  I was completely "blind" in the area of being able to picture something.  It made me insane!  I drank a ton of water to wash it out of my system.  Not cool!
 
2017-11-22 02:33:25 PM  
I remember the good old days when people dealt with anxiety and stress by having a stiff drink and then pulling up their big boy/girl pants and going off to deal with whatever the world was throwing at them. A little bit of liquid courage mixed with good, old fashioned willpower was all it took to get people through their day. Today, we hide under blankets in the fetal position and cry for mind-bending drugs with side effects so ridiculous that it's amazing anyone would even consider taking them.

Yeah, I know you're foaming at the mouth, ready to fire off a nasty response to tell me what a judgemental prick I'm being. And I understand why you'd think that way. But honestly, I'm not being judgemental, at least not of you. Mental health is important, and if this thread is any indicator, there's a hell of a lot of people out there with issues. My judgement is aimed more at the medical and pharmaceutical industry that decided it was better, easier, and more profitable to pump people full of drugs to treat their problems (and then more drugs to counter the effects of the drugs they're pumping people full of to treat their problems). I hope everyone here is getting the (proper) help they need and feeling and doing the best they can.
 
2017-11-22 02:37:55 PM  

Dick Gozinya: I remember the good old days when people dealt with anxiety and stress by having a stiff drink and then pulling up their big boy/girl pants and going off to deal with whatever the world was throwing at them. A little bit of liquid courage mixed with good, old fashioned willpower was all it took to get people through their day. Today, we hide under blankets in the fetal position and cry for mind-bending drugs with side effects so ridiculous that it's amazing anyone would even consider taking them.

Yeah, I know you're foaming at the mouth, ready to fire off a nasty response to tell me what a judgemental prick I'm being. And I understand why you'd think that way. But honestly, I'm not being judgemental, at least not of you. Mental health is important, and if this thread is any indicator, there's a hell of a lot of people out there with issues. My judgement is aimed more at the medical and pharmaceutical industry that decided it was better, easier, and more profitable to pump people full of drugs to treat their problems (and then more drugs to counter the effects of the drugs they're pumping people full of to treat their problems). I hope everyone here is getting the (proper) help they need and feeling and doing the best they can.



img.fark.netView Full Size



All of these things we don't have on Fark seem like CW to me, but what do I know.
 
2017-11-22 02:44:37 PM  

Dick Gozinya: I remember the good old days when people dealt with anxiety and stress by having a stiff drink and then pulling up their big boy/girl pants and going off to deal with whatever the world was throwing at them. A little bit of liquid courage mixed with good, old fashioned willpower was all it took to get people through their day. Today, we hide under blankets in the fetal position and cry for mind-bending drugs with side effects so ridiculous that it's amazing anyone would even consider taking them.

Yeah, I know you're foaming at the mouth, ready to fire off a nasty response to tell me what a judgemental prick I'm being. And I understand why you'd think that way. But honestly, I'm not being judgemental, at least not of you. Mental health is important, and if this thread is any indicator, there's a hell of a lot of people out there with issues. My judgement is aimed more at the medical and pharmaceutical industry that decided it was better, easier, and more profitable to pump people full of drugs to treat their problems (and then more drugs to counter the effects of the drugs they're pumping people full of to treat their problems). I hope everyone here is getting the (proper) help they need and feeling and doing the best they can.


You're not wrong. It's being over prescribed and pharmacology is getting out of control and is seen to be the answer to anything that ails you.

It's how the opioid crises started, or so i am told.
 
2017-11-22 03:04:59 PM  
In my late teens/early 20s I had crippling anxiety. I never saw a therapist (that was probably a mistake) but I did go on some meds. I tried 3 different meds over a few years and they all worked differently with different side effects. The best part was that it allowed me to feel normal for a while.

So my advice for subby is stay on the meds for a bit as long as they work and have minimal side effects (or side effects you can live with.) Once you feel normal and can breathe, work on yourself, break the bad habits, get therapy, learn coping strategies, whatever you need to do.

If someone in your family has been on these same meds, ask how it affected them (apparently you'll have a similar reaction.)
 
2017-11-22 03:30:30 PM  
Haven't been on Zoloft, but have taken Wellbutrin and Effexor and a couple of other things. Not taking anything right now.
BIG DISCLAIMER: I haven't had improvement on anything and have felt considerably worse at times. However, I know that meds have helped a LOT of people - they just haven't helped me.
I can identify with common observation that some meds make you feel numb or distant, taking away the highs and lows, to keep you in the emotional middle ground and hopefully better able to cope with day to day stuff. I use the analogy of putting a vase on a high shelf so there's less chance it can get knocked over and break. Problem is, if there's a big enough jolt to knock it off the shelf, it's a bigger and more damaging fall. I've had complete emotional meltdowns, reducing me to a sobbing, shaking wreck, which is not a great look for a 50-year-old male. Thankfully, the meltdowns have only happened in private or in front of close family and friends or medical professionals, and not at work or at the bank or the mall.
I guess the takeaway is to be aware that things can go south rapidly if you get knocked out of your safe zone. Make sure that you can recognize when things are sliding and have a support plan, even if it's to shelter-in-place emotionally.
If you feel like stepping in front of a train, you can usually avoid going near train tracks. If you feel like going out and finding a train to step in front of, you need help/intervention.
 
2017-11-22 03:42:13 PM  
The younger you are, apparently, the more dangerous SSRIs are. Be careful out there.

For some, a large percentage of their clinical depression is due to a lifetime of sub-clinical depression. Habits of thought. The emotional part of your brain filters out irony. Completely. If you're telling yourself desperately critical things, albeit with a tinge of self-mocking irony, your emotions don't hear the irony. You will feel bad. And worse.

 If you need an  SSRI, I recommend some form of face-to-face therapy as well. That will help you break that lifetime of sub-clinical depression that preceded the current state of affairs.
 
2017-11-22 03:44:55 PM  
Sertraline is baby stuff, relatively speaking. You'll probably feel a little spacy the first week or so, but that fades.

/ takes Sertraline.
// was on Imipramine as a teenager... Now THAT is a biatch!
/// Good luck!
 
2017-11-22 03:59:04 PM  
Beware the full moon
 
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