Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Theresa May says she will not tolerate any attempt to stop her from crashing the British economy   ( bbc.co.uk) divider line
    More: Obvious, Northern Ireland, Brexit, single market, customs union, Daily Telegraph, good Brexit deal, Brexit Secretary David, Cross-bench peer Lord  
•       •       •

851 clicks; posted to Politics » on 10 Nov 2017 at 6:07 AM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



76 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2017-11-10 06:09:08 AM  
Mmm... Instagreen.
 
2017-11-10 06:15:20 AM  
Why do you hate democracy subby?
 
2017-11-10 06:33:18 AM  

Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?


Says a guy who applauds Trump stealing the presidency with a minority of votes. :D
 
2017-11-10 06:48:06 AM  
Oh another ill fated attempt by Maybot to install a sense of authority whilst the tory clown car careers ever onwards.
 
2017-11-10 06:54:23 AM  
I'm pretty confident she's on the way out. Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new), Priti Patel demoted after secret talks abroad, no confidence votes apparently hitting the low 40s (with only 48 or something required to oust her), and a growing swell of influential voices saying for god's sake brexit is a financial disaster we need an urgent rethink.
 
2017-11-10 06:59:38 AM  

Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?


Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.
 
2017-11-10 07:01:15 AM  
"Now, do be a dear and stick your head in the jag-yoo-arr's mouth."
 
2017-11-10 07:01:25 AM  
I've resigned myself to the fact it's happening and now resting my hopes on a long transition period so that everyone can be happy and the Brexiteers can save face. I'm thinking 5-7 years of transitional arrangements should be enough to shore up GBP in the short term; but that may be far too hopeful given the incompetence we've seen so far.
 
2017-11-10 07:07:57 AM  
A prime minister that has to say I am the prime minister" is no prime minister.
 
2017-11-10 07:08:22 AM  
When she is inevitably ousted, and it seems they are just wasting time at this point by delaying, the candidates need to be elected on the basis of a concrete, specific desired outcome for brexit. No more wishy washy bullshiat. Come up with a plan and get electes on that plan or don't run at all.
 
2017-11-10 07:22:08 AM  

Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?


Despite what Farage and Trump say, Brexit is not the will of the people in the UK.
It never has been.
The Brexiters and Trump supporters, all enablers and apologists for the very real harm and damage that they are inflicting on the American and British people, must and absolutely shall own what they have sown.
 
2017-11-10 07:45:15 AM  
Theresa May - would you, or wouldn't you?

I possibly might.

Anyway, isn't it funny how the UK press has gone from fawning over her, comparing her to Thatcher, waxing lyrical about her upbringing, to comparing her to the spawn of Satan?
 
2017-11-10 07:46:19 AM  

Cormee: Theresa May - would you, or wouldn't you?

I possibly might.

Anyway, isn't it funny how the UK press has gone from fawning over her, comparing her to Thatcher, waxing lyrical about her upbringing, to comparing her to the spawn of Satan?


So, the similarity to Thatcher continues.
 
2017-11-10 07:50:00 AM  

Lady J: I'm pretty confident she's on the way out. Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new), Priti Patel demoted after secret talks abroad, no confidence votes apparently hitting the low 40s (with only 48 or something required to oust her), and a growing swell of influential voices saying for god's sake brexit is a financial disaster we need an urgent rethink.


But who is going to replace her that isn't even more brexit bat shiat crazy?
I doubt Johnson is going anywhere, sure he's cocked up with the Iranian thing but the poor woman isn't Anglo-Saxon whitey enough for the right wing to give two shiats about so he'll stay.
Brexit will mindlessly trundle along, the idiocy of the thing has enough inertia and it no longer needs any one in charge to go hurtling over the cliff edge.
 
2017-11-10 07:50:37 AM  

Cormee: Theresa May - would you, or wouldn't you?

I possibly might.

Anyway, isn't it funny how the UK press has gone from fawning over her, comparing her to Thatcher, waxing lyrical about her upbringing, to comparing her to the spawn of Satan?


Um, some areas of the UK press did that. We clearly access different sources.
 
2017-11-10 07:52:12 AM  

Lady J: Cormee: Theresa May - would you, or wouldn't you?

I possibly might.

Anyway, isn't it funny how the UK press has gone from fawning over her, comparing her to Thatcher, waxing lyrical about her upbringing, to comparing her to the spawn of Satan?

Um, some areas of the UK press did that. We clearly access different sources.


Um, OK.
 
2017-11-10 07:57:35 AM  

EyeballKid: Cormee: Theresa May - would you, or wouldn't you?

I possibly might.

Anyway, isn't it funny how the UK press has gone from fawning over her, comparing her to Thatcher, waxing lyrical about her upbringing, to comparing her to the spawn of Satan?

So, the similarity to Thatcher continues.


Fair point, I can't see May lasting as long as Thatcher though.
 
2017-11-10 08:00:14 AM  
I wouldn't go as far as to say that Brexit doesn't have any positive effect for Brits at all. However, I am dead-certain that those sheep, who were mislead to cast their votes against their very own interests by a gigantic propaganda alliance formed by the owners of Daily Mail, Sun etc., are not the ones to feel any of the positive effects.

It's the small elite, the one that has been exposed in the Paradise Papers, who is going to profit.

To put it simple: If you are not in the Paradise Papers, Brexit will mean total disaster for you!
 
2017-11-10 08:07:56 AM  

Zenith: Lady J: I'm pretty confident she's on the way out. Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new), Priti Patel demoted after secret talks abroad, no confidence votes apparently hitting the low 40s (with only 48 or something required to oust her), and a growing swell of influential voices saying for god's sake brexit is a financial disaster we need an urgent rethink.

But who is going to replace her that isn't even more brexit bat shiat crazy?
I doubt Johnson is going anywhere, sure he's cocked up with the Iranian thing but the poor woman isn't Anglo-Saxon whitey enough for the right wing to give two shiats about so he'll stay.
Brexit will mindlessly trundle along, the idiocy of the thing has enough inertia and it no longer needs any one in charge to go hurtling over the cliff edge.


Very possibly. There has been a lot of focus on the bullshiat NHS lie recently though. Once it's made abundandantly clear that not only is there no additional NHS money, but that the NHS will be worse off post Brexit, this provides an opportunity for some people to change their mind re brexit whilst also saving face.
 
2017-11-10 08:16:13 AM  

Paddy: I wouldn't go as far as to say that Brexit doesn't have any positive effect for Brits at all. However, I am dead-certain that those sheep, who were mislead to cast their votes against their very own interests by a gigantic propaganda alliance formed by the owners of Daily Mail, Sun etc., are not the ones to feel any of the positive effects.

It's the small elite, the one that has been exposed in the Paradise Papers, who is going to profit.

To put it simple: If you are not in the Paradise Papers, Brexit will mean total disaster for you!


One of the biggest Brexit supporters, Crispin Odey, who financed some of the campaign, made £220 million on the stock market from it.
 
2017-11-10 08:27:25 AM  

Cormee: Paddy: I wouldn't go as far as to say that Brexit doesn't have any positive effect for Brits at all. However, I am dead-certain that those sheep, who were mislead to cast their votes against their very own interests by a gigantic propaganda alliance formed by the owners of Daily Mail, Sun etc., are not the ones to feel any of the positive effects.

It's the small elite, the one that has been exposed in the Paradise Papers, who is going to profit.

To put it simple: If you are not in the Paradise Papers, Brexit will mean total disaster for you!

One of the biggest Brexit supporters, Crispin Odey, who financed some of the campaign, made £220 million on the stock market from it.


Somebody put together a quick - and by no means complete list of Tory donors who were also in the Paradise Papers:

Sir Henry and Lady Keswick - £150,000. Keswick's company Jardine Matheson was linked to tax avoidance via Luxembourg and has numerous subsidiaries in tax haven Bermuda.
Charles 'Julian' Cazalet - £10,000. Cazalet is a non-executive director of NHS private provider Deltex Medical Group.
John Griffin - £900,000. Griffin and his private hire firm Addison Lee were caught up in a lobbying and tax avoidance scandal in 2012.
David J Rowland - £200,000. A major investigation into Rowland in 2016, and described his offshore tax affairs as "mind blowing".
Andrew E Law - £250,000. Law is a hedge fund owner whose firm Caxton Associates is registered in the US tax avoidance state of Delaware.
Malcolm Healey - £100,000. Healey was fined by HMRC in 2015 for making £8.6m by using a tax avoidance scheme.
Bruce Hardy McLain - £100,000 McLain's private investment firm CVC Capital Partners is currently embroiled in a £5m bribery and tax avoidance scandal involving Formula One.
Ayman and Sawsan Asfari - £100,000. Ayman is currently under investigation by the Serious Fraud Office. He also runs oil company Petrofac, which avoids tax via Jersey.
Rainy City Investments - £100,000 Owned by Peter and Fred Done, who were fined £800,000 by the Serious Fraud Office over money laundering allegations.
Investors in Private Capital Ltd - £150,000 Owned by James 'Jamie' Reuben, family friend of George Osborne, it paid no UK corporation tax in 2014 despite a turnover of £35m.
John C Armitage - £1m. Armitage is the founder of Egerton Capital, a hedge fund that enables tax avoidance for investors.
JCB Service - £500,000 It's owned by Anthony Bamford, who was not only named in the Panama Papers, but who operates JCB out of tax haven Bermuda.

It's all about taxes. It has been calculated recently that through tax havens the EU loses about 1,000,000,000,000,000€ of taxes per year! That's taxes on profits that are made within the EU.

Just imagine how many kindergarten teachers, nurses, teachers, professors you could employ for that?
And these pricks want it all for themselves, therefore they want their country out of the EU. And the 17 million idiots believe it's all about them. Hilarious.
 
2017-11-10 08:31:41 AM  
Sorry Britain, you will have to wait until Jeremy Corbyn becomes PM to see your economy totally collapse.
 
2017-11-10 08:33:52 AM  

Paddy: Cormee: Paddy: ...



Sorry, the zeros give me headaches. Plus the different scales (long vs short) that are being used. And the line breaks. And the rain outside.
What I meant is 1,000,000,000,000€ p.a. What's that in US short scale? A trillion euros? There you go.
 
2017-11-10 08:59:37 AM  

Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.


Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.
 
2017-11-10 09:04:28 AM  

qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.


no it wasn't, it lost seats explicitly on that platform and is in power now simply because it made a deal with a small Northern Ireland party (with a history of supporting terrorism) to continue.
 
2017-11-10 09:19:09 AM  

qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.


They weren't. They really weren't. They had to form a coalition with the DUP to avoid losing their majority. 
Campaigning on an explicit Brexit platform ended up with having to scramble to find somebody to buddy up with them to avoid becoming a minority government - and the only group who would ally with them were a party who want to ban gay marriage and teach creationism in schools and even then the Tories had to bribe them with £1bn.
 
2017-11-10 10:23:07 AM  
"We will not tolerate attempts from any quarter to use the process of amendments to this Bill as a mechanism to try to block the democratic wishes of the British people by attempting to slow down or stop our departure from the European Union."

What exactly are you going to do, Mrs May? What form would your intolerance take? You're already having to let votes pass uncontested because you lack the strength to fight them. You can't control your own cabinet, let alone the backbenchers.

Maybe you could find a wheatfield they really like and run through it. That'll keep those rebels in line.
 
2017-11-10 10:24:36 AM  

Lady J: Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new)


Kinda surprised we haven't had a greenlit on that.
 
2017-11-10 10:39:46 AM  

Satanic_Hamster: Lady J: Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new)

Kinda surprised we haven't had a greenlit on that.


Probably because on the scale of 0 to Trump it barely moves the needle.

/stolen from another farker
//in fairness it is quite a big deal
 
2017-11-10 10:54:11 AM  

Lost Thought 00: When she is inevitably ousted, and it seems they are just wasting time at this point by delaying, the candidates need to be elected on the basis of a concrete, specific desired outcome for brexit. No more wishy washy bullshiat. Come up with a plan and get electes on that plan or don't run at all.


Her ouster will be an internal party vote, not something that is campaigned for in the general population.  The Prime Minster is the head of the majority party in Parliament.  No one is ever elected to be Prime Minister - they win their individual seat, and then assume the position.  When Thatcher went down, Major became PM without a general election, just an intra-party vote.  It was the same with May; Cameron resigned to spend time with his money, and May came out ahead of the Tory Celebrity Bake-off.  Her disaster of a snap election came months later.  When she is carried out behind the barn and shot int he head, Boris and Friends will begin the mother of all backstabbing sessions to see who can crawl over her corpse - none of which will result in an election.
 
2017-11-10 10:57:03 AM  

phalamir: Lost Thought 00: When she is inevitably ousted, and it seems they are just wasting time at this point by delaying, the candidates need to be elected on the basis of a concrete, specific desired outcome for brexit. No more wishy washy bullshiat. Come up with a plan and get electes on that plan or don't run at all.

Her ouster will be an internal party vote, not something that is campaigned for in the general population.  The Prime Minster is the head of the majority party in Parliament.  No one is ever elected to be Prime Minister - they win their individual seat, and then assume the position.  When Thatcher went down, Major became PM without a general election, just an intra-party vote.  It was the same with May; Cameron resigned to spend time with his money, and May came out ahead of the Tory Celebrity Bake-off.  Her disaster of a snap election came months later.  When she is carried out behind the barn and shot int he head, Boris and Friends will begin the mother of all backstabbing sessions to see who can crawl over her corpse - none of which will result in an election.


What's the best we can hope for? Philip Hammond?
 
2017-11-10 11:08:00 AM  

Zenith: Lady J: I'm pretty confident she's on the way out. Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new), Priti Patel demoted after secret talks abroad, no confidence votes apparently hitting the low 40s (with only 48 or something required to oust her), and a growing swell of influential voices saying for god's sake brexit is a financial disaster we need an urgent rethink.

But who is going to replace her that isn't even more brexit bat shiat crazy?
I doubt Johnson is going anywhere, sure he's cocked up with the Iranian thing but the poor woman isn't Anglo-Saxon whitey enough for the right wing to give two shiats about so he'll stay.
Brexit will mindlessly trundle along, the idiocy of the thing has enough inertia and it no longer needs any one in charge to go hurtling over the cliff edge.


There was some recent YouGov polling done on who should replace May:

37% - don't know
27% - none of the above
10% - Boris
8% - Rees-Mogg
4% - Davis, Rudd
3% - Hammond

Truly a ringing endorsement for whomever would take her place.
 
2017-11-10 11:28:43 AM  

And I've just finished my milk: Zenith: Lady J: I'm pretty confident she's on the way out. Boris Johnson royally farking up (what's new), Priti Patel demoted after secret talks abroad, no confidence votes apparently hitting the low 40s (with only 48 or something required to oust her), and a growing swell of influential voices saying for god's sake brexit is a financial disaster we need an urgent rethink.

But who is going to replace her that isn't even more brexit bat shiat crazy?
I doubt Johnson is going anywhere, sure he's cocked up with the Iranian thing but the poor woman isn't Anglo-Saxon whitey enough for the right wing to give two shiats about so he'll stay.
Brexit will mindlessly trundle along, the idiocy of the thing has enough inertia and it no longer needs any one in charge to go hurtling over the cliff edge.

There was some recent YouGov polling done on who should replace May:

37% - don't know
27% - none of the above
10% - Boris
8% - Rees-Mogg
4% - Davis, Rudd
3% - Hammond

Truly a ringing endorsement for whomever would take her place.


Not surprised in the least, never in all my years have I seen such a inept bunch of feckless shiats in government.
They make Corbyn look like a political colossus.
 
2017-11-10 11:28:50 AM  

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

They weren't. They really weren't. They had to form a coalition with the DUP to avoid losing their majority. 
Campaigning on an explicit Brexit platform ended up with having to scramble to find somebody to buddy up with them to avoid becoming a minority government - and the only group who would ally with them were a party who want to ban gay marriage and teach creationism in schools and even then the Tories had to bribe them with £1bn.


Sinn Fein really lost an opportunity with that.  They could have actually taken their seats and forced May to give them another £1bn to secure her new, higher majority (since she barely squeaked by with the Dumb Unkempt Party).  If nothing else, watching Arlene Foster have a meltdown when they also demanded compulsory Catholic catechism education in NI schools would have been worth it.
 
2017-11-10 11:35:13 AM  

Lady J: phalamir: Lost Thought 00: When she is inevitably ousted, and it seems they are just wasting time at this point by delaying, the candidates need to be elected on the basis of a concrete, specific desired outcome for brexit. No more wishy washy bullshiat. Come up with a plan and get electes on that plan or don't run at all.

Her ouster will be an internal party vote, not something that is campaigned for in the general population.  The Prime Minster is the head of the majority party in Parliament.  No one is ever elected to be Prime Minister - they win their individual seat, and then assume the position.  When Thatcher went down, Major became PM without a general election, just an intra-party vote.  It was the same with May; Cameron resigned to spend time with his money, and May came out ahead of the Tory Celebrity Bake-off.  Her disaster of a snap election came months later.  When she is carried out behind the barn and shot int he head, Boris and Friends will begin the mother of all backstabbing sessions to see who can crawl over her corpse - none of which will result in an election.

What's the best we can hope for? Philip Hammond?



How are you defining "we" and "hope for"?  if you mean "we" as the general British population, and "hope for" as best medium-term result, then Boris.  That idiot farkrag will collapse the Tory government inside of a fortnight, and get a new election, where Labour will have a reasonable chance of winning, or at least being the head of a coalition.  Corbyn probably won't actually stop Brexit, but the EU might extend the timetable to give him a chance to get things up and running  - and Labour cannot physically negotiate worse than the Tories (their terms will probably also be more in line with reality).

If "we" is the Tories, and "hope for" is the Thousand Year Reich, then Rees-Mogg.
 
2017-11-10 11:52:03 AM  

phalamir: Some Guy In A Waistcoat: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

They weren't. They really weren't. They had to form a coalition with the DUP to avoid losing their majority. 
Campaigning on an explicit Brexit platform ended up with having to scramble to find somebody to buddy up with them to avoid becoming a minority government - and the only group who would ally with them were a party who want to ban gay marriage and teach creationism in schools and even then the Tories had to bribe them with £1bn.

Sinn Fein really lost an opportunity with that.  They could have actually taken their seats and forced May to give them another £1bn to secure her new, higher majority (since she barely squeaked by with the Dumb Unkempt Party).  If nothing else, watching Arlene Foster have a meltdown when they also demanded compulsory Catholic catechism education in NI schools would have been worth it.


Their whole policy of abstention is puzzling and infuriating. Ostensibly, it's all about protesting 'illegitimate government' and 'instruments of British sovereignty' - but they were pretty happy about breaking that line when it came to Dail Eireann and Stormont, the latter of which is very definitely an exercise in British sovereignty over Northern Ireland.

I feel like Arthur Griffith would slap them silly for taking what he intended to be a short-term tactic to demonstrate self-determination and national independence and turning it into a farking principle of the entire party.
 
2017-11-10 11:58:06 AM  

Lady J: phalamir: Lost Thought 00: When she is inevitably ousted, and it seems they are just wasting time at this point by delaying, the candidates need to be elected on the basis of a concrete, specific desired outcome for brexit. No more wishy washy bullshiat. Come up with a plan and get electes on that plan or don't run at all.

Her ouster will be an internal party vote, not something that is campaigned for in the general population.  The Prime Minster is the head of the majority party in Parliament.  No one is ever elected to be Prime Minister - they win their individual seat, and then assume the position.  When Thatcher went down, Major became PM without a general election, just an intra-party vote.  It was the same with May; Cameron resigned to spend time with his money, and May came out ahead of the Tory Celebrity Bake-off.  Her disaster of a snap election came months later.  When she is carried out behind the barn and shot int he head, Boris and Friends will begin the mother of all backstabbing sessions to see who can crawl over her corpse - none of which will result in an election.

What's the best we can hope for? Philip Hammond?


In terms of pure ideology, he certainly seems like the leading Tory with his head most wrapped around the actual challenges Brexit poses. In terms of the broader political landscape though, it's hard to see how Hammond could really do much. He'd still be inheriting May's precarious working majority and would likely have a hard-Brexit faction even more inflamed against him than May currently has.

At this point, the fact that hard-Brexiteers can achieve their goals by sabotaging the negotiations rather than working through them is probably the key 'game-theory' factor here. Any ground that May (or Hammond) could make in terms of damage-limitation could be undone at a later date by a well timed hard-Brexiteer rebellion that topples them. As long as hard-Brexiteers follow the belief that no deal is better than a bad deal and define a bad deal by things like making a divorce payment, ECJ involvement after 2019 etc,  it's hard to see how we end up with anything other than a no deal exit.

There seem to be increasing rumblings that May is soon to publicly fold on the divorce bill and make a much larger offer, which might bring things to a head.
 
2017-11-10 12:25:37 PM  

And I've just finished my milk: At this point, the fact that hard-Brexiteers can achieve their goals by sabotaging the negotiations rather than working through them is probably the key 'game-theory' factor here. Any ground that May (or Hammond) could make in terms of damage-limitation could be undone at a later date by a well timed hard-Brexiteer rebellion that topples them. As long as hard-Brexiteers follow the belief that no deal is better than a bad deal and define a bad deal by things like making a divorce payment, ECJ involvement after 2019 etc, it's hard to see how we end up with anything other than a no deal exit.


I think the path forward for Britain is clear.

They need to take May, Farage, Hammond, and Johnson to Trafalgar Square, chop off their heads, and deliver them on silver platters to Brussels with a very polite note apologizing for everything and promising not to let it happen again, and with an invitation for tea.

Then revoke article 50, pay any fine for this stupidity, and go forward from there.
 
2017-11-10 12:38:14 PM  

Satanic_Hamster: And I've just finished my milk: At this point, the fact that hard-Brexiteers can achieve their goals by sabotaging the negotiations rather than working through them is probably the key 'game-theory' factor here. Any ground that May (or Hammond) could make in terms of damage-limitation could be undone at a later date by a well timed hard-Brexiteer rebellion that topples them. As long as hard-Brexiteers follow the belief that no deal is better than a bad deal and define a bad deal by things like making a divorce payment, ECJ involvement after 2019 etc, it's hard to see how we end up with anything other than a no deal exit.

I think the path forward for Britain is clear.

They need to take May, Farage, Hammond, and Johnson to Trafalgar Square, chop off their heads, and deliver them on silver platters to Brussels with a very polite note apologizing for everything and promising not to let it happen again, and with an invitation for tea.

Then revoke article 50, pay any fine for this stupidity, and go forward from there.


Satanic_Hamster for PM.
 
2017-11-10 12:40:31 PM  

Zenith: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

no it wasn't, it lost seats explicitly on that platform and is in power now simply because it made a deal with a small Northern Ireland party (with a history of supporting terrorism) to continue.


Some Guy In A Waistcoat: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

They weren't. They really weren't. They had to form a coalition with the DUP to avoid losing their majority. 
Campaigning on an explicit Brexit platform ended up with having to scramble to find somebody to buddy up with them to avoid becoming a minority government - and the only group who would ally with them were a party who want to ban gay marriage and teach creationism in schools and even then the Tories had to bribe them with £1bn.


Look at the number of actual votes.

May and the Conservative party got more votes, and a bigger share of the vote, than both Cameron's victories, Blair second and third victories, Major's victory and Margaret Thatcher's second and third victory. Just as Clinton got more votes than Trump but lost because of the electoral college May got a huge number of votes but lost seats thanks to the system.
The Conservatives even won seats in Scotland.

And Labour were running under a pro Brexit manifesto and did well as well.

The big losers in votes were the SNP and the Lib Dems, both with an anti Brexit, pro EU, manifesto.

The election was a disaster for May but it was very clearly a vote of support for Brexit.
 
2017-11-10 01:21:30 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Zenith: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

no it wasn't, it lost seats explicitly on that platform and is in power now simply because it made a deal with a small Northern Ireland party (with a history of supporting terrorism) to continue.

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: qorkfiend: Silverstaff: Ooba Tooba: Why do you hate democracy subby?

Because a course of action which is so massive, so total and nearly irrevocable, with such sweeping consequences that it's clear that even the side supporting it didn't have actual plans for it to happen, should NOT be handled by a referendum requiring a simple majority where even the law authorizing the referendum said the vote was non-binding.

Well, sure, but then the Tory government was re-elected on an explicit Brexit platform.

They weren't. They really weren't. They had to form a coalition with the DUP to avoid losing their majority. 
Campaigning on an explicit Brexit platform ended up with having to scramble to find somebody to buddy up with them to avoid becoming a minority government - and the only group who would ally with them were a party who want to ban gay marriage and teach creationism in schools and even then the Tories had to bribe them with £1bn.

Look at the number of actual votes.

May and the Conservative party got more votes, and a bigger share of the vote, than both Cameron's victories, Blair second and third victories, Major's victory and Margaret Thatcher's second and third victory. Just as Clinton got more votes than Trump but lost because of the electoral college May got a huge number of votes but lost seats thanks to the system.
The Conservatives even won seats in Scotland.

And Labour were running under a pro Brexit manifesto and did well as well.

The big losers in votes were the SNP and the Lib Dems, both with an anti Brexit, pro EU, manifesto.

The election was a disaster for May but it was very clearly a vote of support for Brexit.


Our country held a referendum in which we inexplicably voted 52-48 in favour of ramming the good ship UK into an iceberg. May took the helm, and duly rammed us into that iceberg by triggering art.50. Then she called a snap election. Shockingly enough, most people gravitated toward the parties offering a way forward now that the ship was already holed, even if those parties were more focused on optimum deckchair configuration rather than lifeboats and lifejackets. Parties still offering pro- (UKIP), or anti- (Lib Dem, SNP) ramming of iceberg positions were rather unsurprisingly left behind.

Don't mistake pragmatic recognition of the fact we've already been rammed into the iceberg and now have to deal with the problems that presents with support for hitting the iceberg in the first place. I didn't vote for an officially pro-Brexit party because I was suddenly in favour of Brexit. I did it because you farktarded Leave morons had already dragged us to a point where limiting the damage done seemed a more pragmatic strategy than hoping to reverse it altogether.
 
2017-11-10 01:31:16 PM  

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: Their whole policy of abstention is puzzling and infuriating. Ostensibly, it's all about protesting 'illegitimate government' and 'instruments of British sovereignty' - but they were pretty happy about breaking that line when it came to Dail Eireann and Stormont, the latter of which is very definitely an exercise in British sovereignty over Northern Ireland.

I feel like Arthur Griffith would slap them silly for taking what he intended to be a short-term tactic to demonstrate self-determination and national independence and turning it into a farking principle of the entire party.


Sinn Fein is the embodiment of whatever the opposite if realpolitik is.  They have a goal (always good to have), and a one-page playbook.  And whenever the play doesn't work, they just do it again.  The big problem was that the only thing the IRA enjoyed more than trying to blow up Orangemen's Cuisinarts was shooting any other member of the IRA judged not farkstupid enough.  It's a study in Darwinism in action - just for a very bad outcome.
 
2017-11-10 01:31:30 PM  
And I've just finished my milk:

Good God, man - didn't you see the sign? "Do not feed the sealion". Now he's going to be here for hours, rambling about how the secret forces of the EU superstate are out to subjugate him and force him to buy memberships at a really dodgy gym.
 
2017-11-10 01:38:08 PM  

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: And I've just finished my milk:

Good God, man - didn't you see the sign? "Do not feed the sealion". Now he's going to be here for hours, rambling about how the secret forces of the EU superstate are out to subjugate him and force him to buy memberships at a really dodgy gym.


And the least ludicrous part of it is that the EU is ruling Canada.
 
2017-11-10 02:00:00 PM  

And I've just finished my milk: Our country held a referendum in which we inexplicably voted 52-48 in favour of ramming the good ship UK into an iceberg. May took the helm, and duly rammed us into that iceberg by triggering art.50. Then she called a snap election. Shockingly enough, most people gravitated toward the parties offering a way forward now that the ship was already holed, even if those parties were more focused on optimum deckchair configuration rather than lifeboats and lifejackets. Parties still offering pro- (UKIP), or anti- (Lib Dem, SNP) ramming of iceberg positions were rather unsurprisingly left behind.Don't mistake pragmatic recognition of the fact we've already been rammed into the iceberg and now have to deal with the problems that presents with support for hitting the iceberg in the first place. I didn't vote for an officially pro-Brexit party because I was suddenly in favour of Brexit. I did it because you farktarded Leave morons had already dragged us to a point where limiting the damage done seemed a more pragmatic strategy than hoping to reverse it altogether.


May still got a lot more votes. The Conservatives increased their votes and their share. They even won seats in Scotland taking them off the pro-EU SNP.

"Most people" voted for Brexit supporting parties. The Conservatives and Labour.

The anti Brexit parties, the SNP and the Lib Dems, lost votes. lots of votes.

The public voted for Brexit in the referendum and in the election.
 
2017-11-10 02:01:38 PM  

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: And I've just finished my milk:

Good God, man - didn't you see the sign? "Do not feed the sealion". Now he's going to be here for hours, rambling about how the secret forces of the EU superstate are out to subjugate him and force him to buy memberships at a really dodgy gym.


When you have to resort to mocking the person rather than debating the facts it is clear you know you have lost the argument.
 
2017-11-10 02:16:00 PM  

phalamir: And the least ludicrous part of it is that the EU is ruling Canada.


Yeah, seems a bit odd how concerned someone in Newfoudnland is over this.
 
2017-11-10 02:45:45 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And I've just finished my milk: Our country held a referendum in which we inexplicably voted 52-48 in favour of ramming the good ship UK into an iceberg. May took the helm, and duly rammed us into that iceberg by triggering art.50. Then she called a snap election. Shockingly enough, most people gravitated toward the parties offering a way forward now that the ship was already holed, even if those parties were more focused on optimum deckchair configuration rather than lifeboats and lifejackets. Parties still offering pro- (UKIP), or anti- (Lib Dem, SNP) ramming of iceberg positions were rather unsurprisingly left behind.Don't mistake pragmatic recognition of the fact we've already been rammed into the iceberg and now have to deal with the problems that presents with support for hitting the iceberg in the first place. I didn't vote for an officially pro-Brexit party because I was suddenly in favour of Brexit. I did it because you farktarded Leave morons had already dragged us to a point where limiting the damage done seemed a more pragmatic strategy than hoping to reverse it altogether.

May still got a lot more votes. The Conservatives increased their votes and their share. They even won seats in Scotland taking them off the pro-EU SNP.

"Most people" voted for Brexit supporting parties. The Conservatives and Labour.

The anti Brexit parties, the SNP and the Lib Dems, lost votes. lots of votes.

The public voted for Brexit in the referendum and in the election.


Boy how are people regretting that now...

Exclusive poll shows public has lost faith in Theresa May's handling of Brexit negotiations
 
2017-11-10 02:51:07 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Some Guy In A Waistcoat: And I've just finished my milk:

Good God, man - didn't you see the sign? "Do not feed the sealion". Now he's going to be here for hours, rambling about how the secret forces of the EU superstate are out to subjugate him and force him to buy memberships at a really dodgy gym.

When you have to resort to mocking the person rather than debating the facts it is clear you know you have lost the argument.


No, we retreat into mockery after we've debated the same facts and had the same arguments again and again. About the only times they've ever changed is when you've done a complete U-turn on issues when you think nobody is looking (like on extending an unconditional guarantee on the rights of citizens after the split). 

Mostly, I feel sorry that this seems to be so crucially important to you that you feel the need to declare 'victory' over everyone else.
 
2017-11-10 03:22:02 PM  

Some Guy In A Waistcoat: About the only times they've ever changed is when you've done a complete U-turn on issues when you think nobody is looking (like on extending an unconditional guarantee on the rights of citizens after the split).


Or denying that the leave campaign ever promised more money for NHS.
 
Displayed 50 of 76 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking

On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.

In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report